By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Member postings for John Doe 2

Here is a list of all the postings John Doe 2 has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Aircraft General Discussion
30/09/2021 12:28:34

I will risk name dropping accusations, but I have been a commercial pilot for 22 years, mostly Airbus, but other types too.

The BA loose Airbus engine cowls and the BA 787 landing gear pin misplacement are frankly unbelievable, but they actually happened, and are indicative of general deskilling and reduction in training within the industry.

Any engineer worth their salt would not make such a basic mistake of putting a ground-lock pin in the wrong hole. Putting the pin into the leg pivot bore and seating on the pin's shoulder instead of it's barrel would have felt completely different, so it is staggering how an engineer could make that mistake - you could feel the difference without even looking. So whoever did it either had no engineering skill or feel at all, or had no experience at all - to make that sort of mistake they cannot have ever put a ground-lock pin in. Having said that, why not a simple label on the gear leg, pointing to the ground-lock pin hole?

The engine cowls - both one engineer and one of the pilots should each have performed separate walk-arounds before closing up and pushing back on every flight - standard operating procedures. Clearly, either no walk-around was performed, or neither person noticed the loose engine cowls. This seems to be a problem - but it is really simple to check the cowl latches, but you do have to bend right down to look underneath. This involves putting a hand on the ground or on the engine intake, resulting in a wet hand on a rainy day - but so what? Far too many times, I heard other pilots joke that they just count the wings and get back in. Not me.

Another possible reason is that almost every other pilot I have ever seen, never wears ear defenders for their walk-around, (I do). This means they have to stick their fingers in their ears against the dangerously loud sound of the aircon packs and the APU - which in turn means that they cannot release a hand to enable them to look underneath the engine cowls, as described above, Therefore, the cowls don't get properly checked.

Owing to the relentless driving down of airline ticket prices and low cost operators, training budgets are being slashed. Pilots and engineers are no longer necessarily highly trained or experienced. Gits like me do not get employed any more, even though I have a good 10 years commercial flying left in me. Younger, much less experienced types are being preferred and we are seeing accidents and incidents resulting from really basic mistakes. The Boeing 737 Max fiasco, involving two fatal crashes, is another result of driving down costs.

 

Edited By John Doe 2 on 30/09/2021 12:31:35

Edited By John Doe 2 on 30/09/2021 12:34:01

Edited By John Doe 2 on 30/09/2021 12:39:16

Thread: Maplin Weather Station Repairs
30/09/2021 11:23:18

Can you explain the fault with your unit?

Have you tried electrical contact or switch cleaner spray on all the connections?

Where was the unit sited - if in the loft, the circuit components might have been cooked. Lofts can get very very hot.

Thread: Multimeter recommendations
23/09/2021 11:10:04

Whoa whoa fellas!

£10 for a fuse? Divide £10 by the number of years until you next blow a fuse - in my case I replaced the fuse in my Fluke 77 with the correct Fluke fuse about 10 years' ago - so it has cost me just £1 per year so far, and I haven't blown it again yet, so that price drops every day.

Why are you trying to use a cheap substandard part? There is a saying from my aviation career; "if you think safety is expensive; try having an accident".

For all we know, genuine Fluke fuses might be filled with nitrogen or other inert gas, or expensive compounds, to ensure its reliability and safety.

For what it's worth:

1. For a safety critical part; use the correct, genuine, manufacture's specified part.

2. Divide the cost of anything by the number of years it will last or that you will use it for.

3. Even though you might not use the meter in a critical situation, your son, or a friend who borrows your meter one day, might do. (Or you might forget that you put a cheap fuse in and endanger yourself).

4. Fluke meters are a quality item. Why cheapen it and compromise its safety performance by trying to save a few quid?

5. Do you use the cheapest available brake pads on your car, or the correct OEM ones? (actually, don't answer that.....!)

 

.

 

Edited By John Doe 2 on 23/09/2021 11:13:27

Edited By John Doe 2 on 23/09/2021 11:15:34

Thread: RAF to give up flying planes.
09/09/2021 12:03:22
Posted by Bazyle on 07/09/2021 16:11:05:

Nobody yet mentioned the saving in fuel and greenhouse gas production. Hopefully sometime soon they will wake up to the negative effects of the massively antisocial hobby of private light aircraft flying.

Aviation contributes less than 4% of global greenhouse gas emissions. A much much greater amount is produced by cars and vehicles, meat farming, home heating, shipping, power stations etc.

A few people flying Cessnas around is nothing compared to the thousands of cars per hour on the roads or lazy people driving when they could walk.

Thread: Multimeter recommendations
08/09/2021 11:53:05

As Jon L suggests: It depends what you want to use a meter for. Any meter will tell you if your car battery is being charged or not. But when you want good quality and good design; to see trends or make more accurate measurements, or high current or mains voltage; you might need to spend a bit more.

Having said that, a big old Avo 8, for example, while lovely to use, is totally impractical in a garage or workshop. My (second-hand) Fluke is robust, with a digital display and an analogue strip, so I can see how a signal is varying in real time. It also has a touch hold facility so I can clip the meter to my belt and the meter will hold the reading without me needing to see the display while probing. Ditto a continuity beeper. Or I can clip one probe into the holster to convert the meter into a hand-held probe, meaning I only need two hands instead of three for those awkward places.

Fluke are high quality and well designed, but certainly not cheap brand new ! - a bit like Snap-On tools. I still want that quality of build and design though, so I look for good second-hand examples. Shame that army surplus place in Nottingham is no more, that was brilliant.

 

Agree with S.O.D.; don't work on - or even probe - electrics if you don't know what you're doing - particularly anything above 55V, which can be lethal. (My first profession was in electronics).

Edited By John Doe 2 on 08/09/2021 11:54:17

Edited By John Doe 2 on 08/09/2021 12:05:45

07/09/2021 18:32:57

I have a grey Fluke 77 series ll that I bought years ago second-hand from a large army surplus store in Nottingham - can't remember the store details, but you can probably find it - they sell tanks as well as surplus Fluke meters !. The '77 is pretty bomb-proof in its rubber/plastic protector and I keep it in its soft carrying case, and keep the screen protecting film on the display. I will admit to having purchased a pack of spare fuses from Fluke, but have only used one since I bought the meter.

It is auto-ranging with LCD display so the battery lasts for ever, and it has a level bar along the bottom to indicate trends, a bit like an analogue meter needle, as well as the four large sized display digits. The '77 has everything you probably need, except capacitance, and it can measure current up to 10A. It has diode test and continuity beeper. and a touch and hold facility. You can test transistors for go/no go with a diode tester of course.

Not quite sure why some recommend cheap equipment - surely here we understand quality, and we know quality costs money? Get decent test leads too, which are not semi-rigid, but nice and flexible.

By good quality gear, look after it properly and it will give superb performance and last a lifetime. yes

Edited By John Doe 2 on 07/09/2021 18:37:14

Thread: Good morning all, new member here.
07/09/2021 11:24:04

Thank you for the welcome.

My restoration will not be fast - there is a lot of DIY to be done to the house as well.

Could someone please point me towards a source of a manual for the Meddings - user instructions and spares diagrams?

I have searched on-line, but have not found a source yet. (I am happy to pay a modest amount if required).

Thread: RAF to give up flying planes.
07/09/2021 11:16:52

As a former commercial pilot, I spent many weeks in simulators during my career. They are amazing, but I found it always easier and a big relief to fly the actual aircraft.

Thread: Why do designers do this!!
07/09/2021 11:07:07

I have changed washing machine dampers.

Haynes manuals would sometimes state something like "Remove rear number plate", as the first part of a job involving the engine !

It used to be a point of satisfaction and pride to be able to perform the job without all the extra steps !

I can't remember which engine maker it was, but some years ago, an aircraft engine manufacturer invited aircraft engineers to see the mock-up of the latest turbo-fan engine, and comment about how to make routine line servicing of the engine easier by re-siting or re-orienting components etc.

Edited By John Doe 2 on 07/09/2021 11:08:26

Thread: New Member
05/09/2021 23:52:58

Sorry, wrong thread, and I cannot see how to remove my previous post. Mods?

Edited By John Doe 2 on 05/09/2021 23:53:40

Thread: Good morning all, new member here.
05/09/2021 23:34:23

'Good morning all, new member here.

As a young kid, I took bikes and lawnmowers apart to see how they worked, and gradually moved on to car engines and Hi-Fi systems. I have continued to be a very practical person, and taught myself to bend and solder copper plumbing, and have installed several domestic water and central heating systems over the years. I have also installed or renewed electrical wiring in houses I have owned.

My working background is in electronics and radio frequency transmission.

I am here because, after years of trying to cut joints and drill holes freehand for various DIY projects, (80% wood, 20% metal), I finally have the chance to equip a garage workshop. I am currently priming and painting the ceiling and concrete block walls, and putting up shelving. I will also paint the smooth concrete floor. My son recently gave me a 3D printer and I have just purchased a second-hand Meddings MF4/5 drill for restoration. The drill has a three phase motor, so after cleaning it up and assembling it; my next project will be to research inverters or maybe VFDs to run it.

300828b9-7123-4a1d-913e-28aaab4058f9.jpeg

 

31b6a221-4299-4c0f-8502-e34c063db502.jpeg

Edited By John Doe 2 on 05/09/2021 23:48:34

Thread: New Member
05/09/2021 12:21:43

Good morning all, new member here.

As a young kid, I took bikes and lawnmowers apart to see how they worked, and gradually moved on to car engines and Hi-Fi systems. I have continued to be a very practical person, and taught myself to bend and solder copper plumbing, and have installed several domestic water and central heating systems over the years. I have also installed or renewed electrical wiring in houses I have owned.

My working background is in electronics and radio frequency transmission.

I am here because, after years of trying to cut joints and drill holes freehand for various DIY projects, (80% wood, 20% metal), I finally have the chance to equip a garage workshop. I am currently priming and painting the ceiling and concrete block walls, and putting up shelving. I will also paint the smooth concrete floor. My son recently gave me a 3D printer and I have just purchased a second-hand Meddings MF4/5 drill for restoration. The drill has a three phase motor, so after cleaning it up and assembling it; my next project will be to research inverters or maybe VFDs to run it.

I can't work out how to post photos yet, but will do so when I can.

JD

Thread: Best soldering iron for electronics
05/09/2021 11:17:46

I used Weller magnastat irons professionally for many years, and I continue to do so at home. The temperature is set by selecting the tip itself, and you change tips if you change the solder you use or the size of the joint you are making.

For general electronics, I recommend an iron with an output of around 45W. Too weak an output can cause more damage since all the wires and components around get heated for longer while you wait for the joint to get hot enough.

Weller are not the cheapest, but they are one of the best, and poor quality stuff is a waste of time. Something like a Weller W61 is good for general electronics; i.e. PCBs and switch terminals etc. RS sell them.

Thread: Computer Bewilderment
04/09/2021 13:56:17

One thing that might be a possibility is the computer power supply failing.

Some supplies are only just sufficient to provide the total current required by all the various devices, and as they age, they can reduce their output, and hence devices start failing. And/or if additional drives have been added, the PSU might not quite be coping; so when a drive attempts to spin up, it could drag the PSU voltage rail(s) down, and the computer might see this and assume a fault with that drive.

When you connected just the power lead to the DVD drive, the computer was OK probably because, without the data lead, the drive was not instructed to spin, so the current drawn was less than it would draw in normal use.

Another possibility is that although you checked the data wires for continuity and shorts, I am guessing you only did this with a DC multimeter? Of course, data wires now work at many megaHertz, and at these frequencies, certain electronic effects can prevent the data being 'cleanly' transmitted along them; for example capacitance between adjacent data cables - which would not show up with a normal multimeter.

Without sophisticated test gear, you are restricted to substituting cables and cleaning connections, as you have been doing.

I would (remove the wall plug), and go over the whole computer internally with a vacuum and a soft brush (very gently), to get any dust out of all the boards and open up the PSU to do the same. Dust can cause overheating and reduced current flow, (and in some cases, short circuits on circuit boards). I would also clean all the connections to the PSU and remake them a few times.

If you remove any items from the computer to clean them, make sure you wear an earthed earthing bracelet around your wrist before handling them - static build-up can kill some components.

Good luck !

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
cowells
rapid Direct
JD Metals
Eccentric July 5 2018
Warco
emcomachinetools
walker midge
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest