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Member postings for Mike Hurley

Here is a list of all the postings Mike Hurley has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Hi all.
04/08/2022 09:37:12

Thor - Would like to check out your links in the above post, but they all fail on my system as a 'security risk'

Any ideas? or is it just my config?

regards. Mike

Thread: You think you've seen it all
02/08/2022 18:08:44

Got me thinking - so checked up.

Apparently, contrary to what I thought, it's specifically NOT against the law in the UK to have an 'unrestrained' animal (by way of leash, cage or whatever) in a vehicle.

However - Driving with pets is covered under Rule 57 of the Highway Code that states: “When in a vehicle make sure dogs or other animals are suitably restrained so they cannot distract you while you are driving or injure you, or themselves if you stop quickly.” However, don't be fooled by thinking this is just advisory as its 'only' in the highway code. Legal guidelines indicate that if an unrestrained animal is involved / causes an accident the driver may be penalised for driving without due care & attention, fined up to £5000 (+ boat load of penalty points). Also both vehicle AND pet insurace may be invalidated, so you could end up severley broken financially as well as bodily.

It gets more complicated - be aware there are apparent risks relating to passenger seat airbags if letting (even if restrained) animals sit on the front seat. We don't so doesn't apply to me, but thought it wise to mention it in case anyone does.

Hope that clarifies things a bit. Regards Mike

02/08/2022 11:30:44
Posted by Derek Lane on 02/08/2022 11:10:10:

My step son visited the other day with his dog in the car and he had to have a restraint for him(the dog that is) in the form of a lead that clips into a seat belt fixture, when we asked he did state that it is now law

Edited By Derek Lane on 02/08/2022 11:10:56

Has been law for quite some time now. The reasoning is sensible. 1. Dogs jumping about and distracting drivers is not a particularly good idea at the best of times. 2. In an accident, a couple of stone of hound being jettisoned into the back of your head & windscreen is going to do nobody any good.

I've been using one for several years, and the dog soon got used to it - has sufficent slack to move about a bit and seems perfectly comfortable.

regards Mike

 

p.s Love the photos Hopper!

Edited By Mike Hurley on 02/08/2022 11:31:14

02/08/2022 11:29:44
Posted by Derek Lane on 02/08/2022 11:10:10:

My step son visited the other day with his dog in the car and he had to have a restraint for him(the dog that is) in the form of a lead that clips into a seat belt fixture, when we asked he did state that it is now law

Edited By Derek Lane on 02/08/2022 11:10:56

Has been law for quite some time now. The reasoning is sensible. 1. Dogs jumping about and distracting drivers is not a particularly good idea at the best of times. 2. In an accident, a couple of stone of hound being jettisoned into the back of your head & windscreen is going to do nobody any good.

I've been using one for several years, and the dog soon got used to it - has sufficent slack to move about a bit and seems perfectly comfortable.

regards Mike

01/08/2022 09:17:26

Hopper - don't suppose you have any old photo's of the dog on the tank? Sounds great!

regards Mike (Avid dog-person)

Thread: Sanding belt cleaner
27/07/2022 09:23:12

We always used a tightly wound couple of plastic carrier bags on all our woodworking sanders, worked a treat. Of course that was back in the days when bags were free and plentiful! Still, 10p is still more economical than buying a 'proper' cleaner I suppose.

Thread: Thread tip information
25/07/2022 09:04:52

To be honest, I have given up using them and reverted to hand ground HSS. Whilst I initially thought they would make thread cutting a breeze, it was not so.

I just suffered so many breakages/chipping of the tips. Admittedly this was not the fault of the tooling but more my cack-handedness probably, I ended up spending more time trying to get the jobs done than before. I say not the fault of the tooling, but in at least one case I did suspect an 'economy' set from a large weel known supplier of tools.

Horses for courses as they say, and I'm sure most people find them a great boon, Personally, as I'm lucky enough to be able to grind toolbits quite well, I sticking with what I know (and saving a few bob in the bargain).

All the best. Mike

Thread: Yet another scam
18/07/2022 08:47:11

Couldn't possibly be from the DVLA. Unlike the rest of the planet who are working pretty normally, the cretins at the DVLA are apparently still severly hampered by COVID, so couldn't possibly organise sending out requests / forms

(You may get the imression that they are not my favorite people - wife still waiting for licence renewal 12 months after appplying - even got the local MP involved, hasn't made much difference even though she quite obviously did try to get sense out of these morons)

Thread: Machinist hammer
17/07/2022 09:35:27

Nice job Chris.

This is exactly the sort of project I was given when we started 'metalworking' lessons at school (late 60's). Simple, but usually well thought out to give a good spread of the BASICS - most of which have served me well since. Have still got many of these items today.

It easy to try & run before you walk and get de-motivated. so stick with getting things right and you will be well rewarded in the log run.

All the best, Mike

Thread: Oils/grease for mini lathe
14/07/2022 10:40:19

Don't get too bogged down with specifics at the early stages. As Nicholas says - any thin machine oil used freqently will be fine. Get a few basic cutting tools and start cutting metal asap - you will soom learn what works for you best, and what types / shapes etc you need for the type of work you intend doing.

A BIG mistake ( I know because I made it when I started out) is buying all manor of this / that / the other thinking the more you have the better will be the jobs you trty to do. WRONG. I ended up with loads of tools / accessories etc that just sit gathering dust.

The benefit of modern on-line shopping is you can get hold of exactly what you actually need very quickly, so in the middle of a project if there is a specific tool needed you can usually get it in 24hrs! Years ago, you had to look it up in a catalogue, post off an order form and wait - often weeks (usually to be told it was out of stock anyway) so it made some sense to 'stock up' with what you thought necessary well in advance.

Have fun - get turning. Mike

Edited By Mike Hurley on 14/07/2022 10:40:36

Thread: Rev. Counter
14/07/2022 10:12:00

Agree with Howi - the unit widely advertised on line works great, Easy to set up and seems reliable (well mine is). Quite a range of prices for exactly the same unit so just hunt around a bit!

Really not worth the bother fiddling with your existing setup in MHO

regards, Mike

Thread: Garden ornament on ebay
28/06/2022 10:08:07

Bit of rust remover gunk & it would be good as new!

Thread: Sad consequence of rising costs
27/06/2022 09:50:12

re the fitting of electric motors to classic cars. Makes sense in many ways, but would you feel at all inclined to pay money to see a collection of cars / bikes silently wafting around a field like oversized Scalextric? To me the sound / smells are an intrinsic part of such events. Perhaps I'm just getting old / too nostalgic ?

On coal (as a fuel for heritage railways etc), am I being thick - is there a law saying you cannot mine coal anymore? If not - there is a demand, import costs are high - we've still got plenty, so why aren't entrepeneurs looking at modest mining again? With modern technology and methods I would have though a limited small-scale 'industry' would be viable. With the amount of use we are talking about, the amount of CO2 etc would still be minute compared to everything else being belched out. I fully endorse the efforts to reduce such pollution but still think that we are talking about such a tiny, insignificant amount in this context.

26/06/2022 09:33:05

Went to a gala day in Hereford yesterday, usually an excellent event. though still enjoyable it mas markedly less well supported by the usual array of vehicles etc for the show ring. The sparse showing of just 3 small military vehicles was disspointing but as explained by the commentator, vehicles doing 7 miles to the gallon just aren't viable for their owners pockets to attend such events (where they don't get an attendance fee). The working display of traction engines was good, but again, the commentator explained how the shortage / ever increasing cost of coal was a major headache, and incidently seriously affecting the heritage railways also.

I'm sure ther are many members here that own/run the affected engines / vehicles and are all too aware of my comments, but as a non-owner I hadn't given this any consideration until this was described at the event, but certainly set me thinking - Is there going to come a time when working displays of this sort are no longer viable? Sad day that would be, but what is the alternative?

Bit depressing really. All the best. Mike

Thread: I may be stupid but
24/06/2022 09:15:10
Posted by Rex Hanman on 24/06/2022 08:02:16:

If one hole is adequate, why would the manufacturer add others? There must be an advantage other than convenience.

My thoughts exactly!

Thread: Interesting YouTube Video.
23/06/2022 09:37:57

Really nice video, worth 10 mins of anybody's time to relax with.

That looks an imressive club track / site aswell!

Mike

Thread: Looking for help valuing two lathes
19/06/2022 09:39:27

Age & the inevitable

A topic that has come upmany times before - there's an excellent articel reprint on the site 'Disposing of a workshop' full of useful tips.

I took this on board recently and began an inventory of kit, estimated values, possible contact names / companies etc that may be interested after I'm gawn. Takes time, but its a thoughtful thing to do for those left behind. There's a printed copy of it with all my 'important' papers - so easy to find.

I've also began to clean out some of the REAL junk (truly just stuff that I should never have kept in the first place).

Mike

Thread: Recommended vice for Warco WM14
12/06/2022 10:25:54

+1 for the 80mm. I use one of ARC's precision machine vices (type 3) for 95% of the time on my WM14. I've got a slightly larger & heavier 'economy' vice for odd times I need extra capacity.

As is often the case, a lot of it depends on what sort of work you are holding the majority of the time, just don't get anything too big - they will get in the way with this machine and it's limited table size and clearance.

regards Mike

Thread: The Correct Way To Sharpen Drill Bits Using A Picador Drill Sharpening Jig With Custom Base
01/06/2022 09:54:06

The versions I had were Draper brand, and from what I remeber the instructions were limited and a bit confusing, the diagrams smudgy. Yours seems to be fairlly vague about how far the drill tip should project, as best as I can read it says 1/16th" or increased for 1/4" drills and larger. The ones I had always said to specifically project one half of the drills diameter, and there was nothing about this 5 to 5 positioning.

Perhaps I'll give mine another go with 'your' instructions!

regards Mike

01/06/2022 09:34:23

This has been aired several times over the years, and opinions differ. The Harold 'Hall Tool & cutter sharpening' book shows this method in a large colour picture on the cover, which may give a false impression of correctness for beginners if they don't read the full text inside.

To be honest, I find these jigs just a bit of a pain sometimes - the are OK for larger drills say 8 - 10mm + but give variable results under those sizes. OK it might be me - I'll admit it - but I have persevered with those on and off over a number of years with mixed results.

In the past i have knocked up special bases to permit the correct height setting when using the front edge of the grinding wheel, a sliding base to give a threaded micrometer-like feed to the jig (that was from an Internet idea) but nothing seemed wholly successful. It always seems to end up an issue cutting the second edge - they still seem to come out slightly uneven.

All the best, Mike

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