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Member postings for Ronald Morrison

Here is a list of all the postings Ronald Morrison has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Cup grinder application
12/08/2020 11:38:15

Select the white wheel instead of the diamond unless you are only grinding carbide or are using it in a low speed grinder. When using diamond for grinding steel where the steel will become hot the diamond (pure carbon for practical purposes) can dissolve into the steel increasing its carbon content but leaving little cutting action from the diamond.

Thread: Fiber change gears
17/07/2020 11:14:09

Delrin should not need lubrication buy shouldn't be harmed by lubrication either.

Thread: New Lathe - poor suface finish on my results
12/06/2020 14:09:01
Posted by Ace Chandler on 12/06/2020 12:53:35:
Posted by Ronald Morrison on 12/06/2020 11:43:55:

1. Check that every gib is adjusted to get a slight drag. Don't expect the manufacturer to have adjusted everything to the best fit. Loose fitment on the cross slide and compound will get you bad results.

2. Sharp tools make accurate cuts. Dull tools push the steel instead of cutting it. Carbide inserts have their place. They are made to be able to withstand higher temperatures that come with high RPM and heavy feeds. They cannot be super sharp because they are brittle and the edge will chip. If you want super sharp so you can make very light cuts use high speed steel and learn to grind the proper shape and to hone it to razor sharp.

3. Back off the tool from the steel before backing the carriage for the next cut.

could you help me understand a bit more what the first point precisely means? - does "slight drag" mean that it should feel a little tighter than one might intuitively think was needed?

Snug up the gib while trying to turn the handwheel. Do each gib screw and make sure the screw is slightly snug but does not bind the handwheel. The handwheel should still turn relatively easy but not freely. Hard to explain better without being there.

12/06/2020 11:43:55

1. Check that every gib is adjusted to get a slight drag. Don't expect the manufacturer to have adjusted everything to the best fit. Loose fitment on the cross slide and compound will get you bad results.

2. Sharp tools make accurate cuts. Dull tools push the steel instead of cutting it. Carbide inserts have their place. They are made to be able to withstand higher temperatures that come with high RPM and heavy feeds. They cannot be super sharp because they are brittle and the edge will chip. If you want super sharp so you can make very light cuts use high speed steel and learn to grind the proper shape and to hone it to razor sharp.

3. Back off the tool from the steel before backing the carriage for the next cut.

Thread: Machines and equipment sourcing chronology...
01/06/2020 10:42:40

i put off buying a bandsaw for years, using the hacksaw for all my small cutting and oxy-acetalene or plasma for the bigger cuts. What a mistake! Now that I have a bandsaw I will carry parts 100 meters to the bandsaw instead of picking up the hacksaw that is 1 meter away. The accuracy of the cuts is better than I ever managed with the hacksaw and I can clamp the stock in, start the bandsaw and walk away to do other things, knowing that the bandsaw will just shut itself off when the cut is done.

Thread: Single point threading
26/05/2020 15:42:17

I have a terrible time threading up to a shoulder as I can't seem to stop the carriage just at the right time with the motor turning the spindle so I made up a crank that would turn the spindle. That lets me turn the spindle very slowly, much slower than the motor will go and I can then stop the turning just where I want.

Thread: 3D CAD software - what do you use?
20/05/2020 11:18:10
Posted by Bandersnatch on 20/05/2020 01:33:22:
Posted by Barrie Lever on 20/05/2020 00:04:49:
Posted by Bandersnatch on 19/05/2020 22:16:16:

Do you do 3D printing?

Yes but almost exclusively from my own designs.

I do my own stuff too (really get a kick out of modelling then seeing the printed result!).

However I'm printing something right now from Thingi. It's a longish print (~8 hrs) and it's not going that well. I think the design could be modified to improve printing (and function actually) with some simple changes. But .... I only have an STL file. The only other recourse is to remodel it from scratch.

Edited By Bandersnatch on 20/05/2020 01:35:18

Thingiverse doesn't prohibit posting the CAD file in with the STL but most people don't care to make changes or the person posting doesn't want others to make changes so they don't upload the CAD file. When you see an item you want to modify, the maker's name is on the top of the first picture. Clicking on that name opens an "about" page with a place at the bottom to send a message. Asking for the CAD file would be my method for starting to modify.

Thread: G code sender for grbl
12/05/2020 18:48:13

Take a look at this mill controller. Since all you want to do is move the table of the mill this might work for you. It does need an Arduino Mega 2560 as an Arduino Uno does not have sufficient memory space.

Thread: Die grinder or dremel - relieving cast iron
12/05/2020 10:39:14
Posted by old mart on 11/05/2020 20:36:26:

You can get a cheap die grinder on ebay for much less than your price, and it is ten times as powerful as a Dremel. They will hold carbide rotary burrs up to 3/4" diameter. If you have a compressor, a pneumatic die grinder is even cheaper than an electric one.

The pneumatic one will really eat metal with the carbide burr but be sure to be wearing eye protection and leather gloves as the metal particle as tiny an very sharp. If you get one in your finger it is nearly impossible to see it to be able to remove.

Thread: G code sender for grbl
12/05/2020 10:34:21

I can't help you with any app for an Android but I use a Raspberry Pi 3B as the computer to drive my Arduino and have the choice of Universal Gcode Sender or bCNC. They both work for sending the code but I can't get the toolpath to show on UGS while bCNC does. The setup feature in UGS makes adjusting the steps for accurate movement a lot easier than doing it by hand.

Thread: ML7 Genuine Gears vs Replacement
10/05/2020 11:55:24
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 10/05/2020 10:22:59:
Posted by Jeremy Upton on 09/05/2020 19:44:02:

...

I have have a Myford ML7R which ... did not come with a full set of standard gears. ... I purchased a used genuine vintage Myford set off an auction site only to find nearly half of them appear to have a lot of wear/loose mesh.

...

Any chance of photos please? The 'genuine vintage Myford' gears may be nothing of the kind, or badly worn.

Although there's much to be said in favour of Myford lathes, they're not immune to wear and tear or any of the other bad things that happen to old tools over several decades.

Worse, because Myford's reputation attracts buyers like starving wasps to jam, grotty machines are tarted up, or badly assembled from cannibalised wrecks, and good machines are separated from their tools and accessories to bump up profits. How good a refurbished machine is depends on who did it, and there are some right bozos out there!

The problem extends to spares. Myford parts are imitated and counterfeited, and - allegedly - modern parts from the current owner aren't as good as the originals. There's even stuff sold mentioning Myford in the description that has nothing to do with Myford! Plus an enthusiastic market for Myford spares sourced from breakers, car-boot sales, and deceased workshops; the state of these varies from junk to as-new, plus fakes.

When faced with an engineering problem, best to eliminate possibilities. At the moment, it could be the gears aren't Myford at all! But that's pessimistic: another simple possibility is the gears aren't being assembled on the banjo correctly, which is easy to fix when you know how.

Though Jeremy's four questions may become valid later, I suggest concentrating on:

'What's wrong with these gears in this set-up?' (Picture needed.)

Provided they can be made to mesh, change gears don't have to be high-tech. Their purpose is just to generate a ratio, and even crudely made and worn gears perform. Ugly noisy gears spoil pride of ownership though, and many people work best with tools they like, and are irritated by minor imperfections. No point in owning tools you hate! If that's the problem with these gears, the only thing to be done is try again. I don't know of a guaranteed way of buying a set of perfect original ML7 change gears other than by inspecting them first.

Dave

Some of us on the west side of the Atlantic are using 3D printed plastic gears for our change gears. They are cheap as dirt to print and with minimal CAD skills we can create gears with any number of teeth to fit any diameter of shaft. The plastic gears have different wear characteristics than metal gears which may be an advantage but in any case, once the gear is designed and the CAD file saved, one can remake any of the plastic gears for pennies.

Thread: Plillow block bearing assemblies for layshaft
07/05/2020 12:21:51
Posted by Adrian R2 on 07/05/2020 11:44:38:

I've got some similar to these. I think the nipple only lubricates the swivel that copes with shaft misalignment, the actual bearings I suspect are pre-greased and sealed.

Edit, on the other hand if you google the serial number for the insert there does appear to be a feature that could be a hole into the race for lubrication....another new thing learned.

Edited By Adrian R2 on 07/05/2020 11:50:48

There are bearings with the grease hole through the outer race but you don't buy that kind of bearing for the price listed. at least on the western side of the Atlantic. I would expect to have to pay 5 to 10 times that amount for that feature in the bearing as it would be made for a much more demanding application.

Thread: Lathe tool types
05/05/2020 11:51:02

I rarely use a left hand tool in my lathe. About the only time I find it necessary is if I need to turn a piece with a smaller diameter in the middle and then I use it to cut toward the tailstock end to clean up the cut. Most other operations work well with the right hand cutters.

Many of the carbide tool are not as sharp as can be had with HSS as the carbide, while harder, is usually more brittle and easily chipped. For light cuts on a small lathe you can use a diamond hand stone to put a sharper edge on them but be careful not to chip them then.

Thread: Boring tooling
04/05/2020 23:49:54

Unless you have a specific need for the fly cutter, skip it and don't lose any sleep over it. It's faster for flattening a big surface but a good endmill will get the job done too.

Thread: Gear Cutting
01/05/2020 17:40:45

What will the tooth load be on the gear? If it is low enough like in the geartrain of a lathe where you want the ratio to be correct but the load low a 3D printed gear works pretty well. For power transmission with a higher tooth load then metal would be needed.

Thread: Cutting small gears.
01/05/2020 17:38:12
Posted by Steve Crow on 01/05/2020 17:17:07

That is interesting, There is quite a wide variety of small size solid carbide end mills available, although a bit more expensive.

How many flutes would you recommend for HSS? It looks like 3 in the photo. And cutting speeds? Doesn't carbide like a high speed. But with HSS?

Any hints or tips welcome.

it isn't so much that carbide likes high speed it is more that it can work at the higher speeds because it doesn't lose its temper at the higher temperature. The number of flutes matters more with softer material as you can take deeper cuts and that can fill the space between the flutes. You need a way to evacuate the chips faster with the softer material so a single flute or 2 flute mills work better on aluminum than a 4 or 6 flute mill would.

Please, someone with more experience correct me if I am giving grossly wrong info.

Thread: Increasing Print Area
29/04/2020 10:44:58

In the newest version of Cura you would choose the printer you have in the setup section and it will set the build table size automatically. With a little digging you will be able to find this setting and make changes to the build table size. Do so with care, prints will not come out like you intended if the print head or table hit the end of their movement as the stepper motors will chatter a bit and then assume they are at the right location while they are not.

Thread: DRO Flashing
25/04/2020 11:20:03

Corrosion that you can't see may also be the cause. Try cleaning the contacts well before throwing out either battery.

Thread: Drummond M type drive and parts query
24/04/2020 12:49:55

Many years ago I brazed up a new tooth for a motorcycle gearbox where one was broken off. I filed it to rough shape and it worked for the time I had the cycle but the tooth shape wasn't perfect and it made a ticking noise. It was still working when the motorcycle was stolen.

Thread: Boxford change gears for screwcutting.
24/04/2020 12:45:42

I've used this website to calculate different gear combinations to make specific threads.

Threading calculator

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