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Member postings for AJAX

Here is a list of all the postings AJAX has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: garden tractor wheel lug nuts and studs
10/06/2020 20:31:35
Posted by oldvelo on 09/06/2020 02:34:56:

Hi Ajax

I had problems too with accessing my albums Etc. The advice I recieved was to use the Icon No 6 on the second row of the posting window or as it advises Ctrl + K keys together.

Great interesting project looking forward to seeing it running.

Eric

Eric,

Thanks for your helpful suggestion. I tried the link option (Ctrl+K) which produced a text link, but found the Image button a better option when I found that I could use the URL for the image.

Brian

10/06/2020 20:29:09

And here is a video update if anyone is interested to have a look around.

10/06/2020 20:25:00

Some progress has now been made. The chassis has been fully stripped down and some weld repairs made. It has been repainted with Hammerite red oxide primer and Lidl grey paint. I have used this Lidl paint on several projects and rate it highly - it can't be beaten on price, it's tough and looks good too. The wheels are back on and the motor is being positioned for permanent mounting.

Edited By AJAX on 10/06/2020 20:25:25

08/06/2020 22:16:53

I'm still waiting for parts to be delivered, so this has given me a chance to strip everything down, do some weld repairs and give it a lick of paint. Here's a video if you are interested.

https://youtu.be/7Uq76twni7s

Take care,

Brian

Thread: Boxford needs new motor.
05/06/2020 08:57:14
Posted by Gavlar on 04/06/2020 11:39:34:

I've replaced the motor several Boxfords over recent years. I think you may find it a struggle to get the motors you've linked to, to physically fit, due to the big box containing the capacitors on the side of the motor. You may also need to modify the mount on the motor and/or the lathe itself. If you can source a B56 frame foot mount motor (ideally resilient mount) it will drop straight in without modification.

Edited By Gavlar on 04/06/2020 11:41:22

A 3 phase motor won't have the start or run capacitors found on a single phase motor.

Thread: Soldering Iron
04/06/2020 00:43:41
Posted by Steviegtr on 31/05/2020 12:58:17:

Weller have a good name in irons. You may find the 30w iron a little big on small jobs.

Then there are the gas refillable ones of which some are quite good. But not cheap.

Steve.

Depends on the tip used, and the person using it. I find my 40W Weller good for nearly every job I do.

04/06/2020 00:41:20
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 31/05/2020 15:01:17:
Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 31/05/2020 12:46:33:

.
I was very disappointed with my ANTEX 15watt iron (replicable tip), it came with a cable more like an anaconda […]]

.

The very early versions had a beautifully flexible, very small diameter, black lead

... When I bought a new one with the ceramic element [about 35 years ago] it came with a horrible white figure-of-eight cable crying 2

MichaelG.

I have about 40 Antex soldering irons at work. Nearly all of them have the flexible silicone leads. Just choose it as the slightly more expensive option when ordering. They are decent soldering irons, very rarely fail and parts are available.

04/06/2020 00:38:06
Posted by Robert Atkinson 2 on 31/05/2020 16:20:59:

What sort of "small jobs"?

If electical / electronic I'd recommend a temeperature controlled iron in the 30-50W power range.
My personal choice has been Weller for over 30 years. Always liked the TCP series where the temperature is set by a alloy pellet with the correct curie point at the end of the bit. I don't like the new two part tips though.

Problem is decent ones are expensive and a lot of the cheaper ones are cheap nd nasty.

Robert G8RPI.

I still use mine regularly. It's the 40W version if I remember correctly, bought secondhand and still going strong. I did replace the leads for silicone as I like the flexibility.

Thread: garden tractor wheel lug nuts and studs
02/06/2020 22:58:26
Posted by Nigel McBurney 1 on 02/06/2020 10:12:37:

I have seen similar hub problems on 1950s steel "British Hubs" fitted to the back wheels of Dot and Greeves competition machines,where the sprocket bolts were forever coming loose.The previous owner no doubt had found that instead of the wheel nuts coming loose ,the action of the wheels over rough ground rattled the short end of the studs out of the hubs,the wheel nuts did not come loose .to cure the problem he reversed the studs and put a lock nut on the back of the hub,

You could well be right and I can't think of a better explanation.

02/06/2020 22:55:14
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 02/06/2020 10:20:37:

If the female threads are worn or damaged beyond use, then I think this commonly available style of stud would be the obvious replacement: **LINK**

https://www.buycarparts.co.uk/febi-bilstein/7009358

MichaelG.

The female threads are in good condition. For now I think I will just use 1/2 UNC screws with the original lug nuts, but I might consider this "upgrade" later.

That link you posted doesn't have a datasheet for the part. I wonder what the recommended size and tolerance is for the receiving hole.

02/06/2020 22:51:08
Posted by JasonB on 02/06/2020 10:18:46:

What condition are the threads in the hub? could be that they stripped and a previous owner swapped the studs round so he could put a nut each side, that is the only reason I can think of for having the long part in the hub.

There is a photo with the thread gauge positioned right into the thread and pitch looks Ok.

After removing the "lock nuts" from behind the studs, all but one of the threaded studs took a *lot* of persuasion before they could be removed. However, the good news is the female threads appear to be in good condition. This still leaves the question of why the studs were installed like this but oh well.

02/06/2020 22:48:02
Posted by DC31k on 02/06/2020 09:24:26:

Remove all old studs and nuts behind hub.

Throw in skip.

Drill out all threads in hub with 1/2" drill.

Buy 1/2" UNF bolts and proper chamfered wheelnuts.

Install.

Use.

Optional: tack weld bolt heads so only one spanner needed.

After a lot of persuasion (heat, hammers, pipe wrench, and welding nuts to the studs to get more grip) I finally removed all 8 studs this afternoon. Your idea is certainly an option, and UNF wheelnuts are so easy to get, but if I choose to drill out the threads I'd rather use the tapered wheel bolts that have been suggested elsewhere.

02/06/2020 22:39:59
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 02/06/2020 08:30:19:

The assembly should, presumably, look something like this: **LINK**

https://www.gardentractorspares.co.uk/westwood-countax-tractor-rear-wheel-hub-198002000

MichaelG.

Thanks for that link. Yes, I agree that it should look something like that.

02/06/2020 08:23:27
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 02/06/2020 08:11:55:
Posted by JasonB on 02/06/2020 07:54:58:

Last photo looks wrong to me and combined with the lack of engagement from the wheel nuts I would say the short end of the stud should go into the threaded hub with no lock nut at the back and the wheel nuts will then have a decent length of thread to screw onto.

.

Agreed yes

The short thread should be tightly screwed into the casting, to be semi-permanent.

... nuts are for retaining/releasing the wheel.

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 02/06/2020 08:12:19

Thanks. The lug nuts appear to be a UNC tapered thread (not UNF) but I can't find anything like this online. Am I just mistaken in the measurement?

02/06/2020 08:19:17
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 02/06/2020 08:11:55:
Posted by JasonB on 02/06/2020 07:54:58:

Last photo looks wrong to me and combined with the lack of engagement from the wheel nuts I would say the short end of the stud should go into the threaded hub with no lock nut at the back and the wheel nuts will then have a decent length of thread to screw onto.

.

Agreed yes

The short thread should be tightly screwed into the casting, to be semi-permanent.

... nuts are for retaining/releasing the wheel.

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 02/06/2020 08:12:19

Thanks. The lug nuts appear to be a UNC tapered thread (not UNF) but I can't find anything like this online. Am I just mistaken in the measurement?

02/06/2020 08:17:06
Posted by JasonB on 02/06/2020 07:54:58:

Last photo looks wrong to me and combined with the lack of engagement from the wheel nuts I would say the short end of the stud should go into the threaded hub with no lock nut at the back and the wheel nuts will then have a decent length of thread to screw onto.

Agreed - it does look wrong. However, I wonder why they did it like this. As mentioned in my original post, some of the studs are in poor condition and the lug nuts appear to have a tapered thread. Maybe a previous owner found it too difficult to thread the nuts onto a decent length of stud so they reversed them and exposed an absolute minimum amount of thread?

02/06/2020 07:45:46

I wonder if anyone here can advise regarding wheel studs for a walk behind garden tractor / powered wheelbarrow.

*** I have uploaded many photos into a new album but the album is not currently showing up so I can't link photos to this thread. ***

The machine is somewhat vintage but not antique and is substantial in construction. Each wheel is fitted with four lug nuts and double-ended studs. The studs appear to be 1/2" UNC (13 TPI). Each stud has a long and short threaded section. The long threads are parallel. The short threads look parallel, but possibly tapered. I do not have a threading die or UNC nut to check any of these threads.

Behind the hub, most of the studs are locked with a nut. I have not measured this but it is not 7/8" AF. The lug nuts are 7/8". Some of the studs are too short (or threaded too far through the hub?) leaving too little thread for the lug wheel nuts.
Some of the studs are in poor condition or too short and so I would like to replace them. What should I be looking for? Perhaps I have made an incorrect measurement somewhere, as 1/2" UNC lug nuts do not appear to be available. 1/2" UNF on the other hand appear to be a common standard. The lug nuts do appear to have a tapered thread but I have yet to find any like this online. I'd be happy to replace the lot if needed.

Many thanks for taking the time to read this post.

Brian

Thread: TiN coated twist drills
03/01/2020 20:17:05
Posted by Steviegtr on 03/01/2020 18:51:13:

Mmn I have a few LED floods fitted. One at back of garage just gone duff at 18 months old. Not expensive though.

The same has happened to me, but I replaced the "non-replaceable" 10 W LED chip (cost about 50p) and it worked like a new one. Still going strong a couple of years later.

Thread: diy power on mill
26/11/2019 22:49:22

You might be able to find an old ATX PSU that can supply the required current at 12V. I even picked up a couple of old server PSUs capable of supplying 12V at 80A. They cost me 50p each at a car boot sale. It's quite easy to design a PWM circuit to drive a DC motor like yours - I've done it and it works well.

Thread: Inverters and stop switches
11/11/2019 06:34:32

Are you sure those crimp connectors have been terminated with the correct amount of force? Did you use a ratchet crimping tool (should work correctly), a pair of pliers, or those cheap crimping pliers with no ratchet action? I wouldn't want to risk any terminations being made incorrectly.

Brian

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