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Member postings for Chris TickTock

Here is a list of all the postings Chris TickTock has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Any one used a digital microscope for micro turning on a lathe
07/09/2019 17:03:44

This forum is not for me.

Chris

07/09/2019 13:48:50
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 07/09/2019 13:25:15:
Posted by Chris TickTock on 07/09/2019 09:40:29:

. not sure I understand Neis rejection of the illuminated magnifier having latency, it would introduce likely distortion but not latency 9correct me if i am wrong).

Yes Sorry Neil got hold of the wrong end of the stick. For most things probably an optivisor will do as you say. Jason also has come up with the bright idea of using the mobile phone as a magnifying device. Don't yet fully get that but will look into that in a few minutes. I have also just received some updated advice on cutting a staff using the wheels as opposed to the graver. The advice really is that a microscope isn't necessary as you need to watch the wheels. I get that but with a more inexperienced machinist such as myself magnification would be very useful to see what is going on and what I am achieving in terms of cuts on small items.

Regards

Chris

Not sure I understand either? If you read what I wrote I said my USB microscope had latency, which is why i suggested just using a magnifier..

Someone asked about safety googles with close up lenses in, yes they are readily available ()stand at all the shows I have been to recently).

Optivisor should be fine for things like balance staffs...

Best solution is the one I use - myopia. I just take off my glasses, wear safety specs and make sure nothing is dangling near the rotating work.

07/09/2019 09:40:29

Thanks to all these helpful and polite replies. i have a pair of cheap telescopic glasses; yes you have to be really close up. The you tube digital also I have looked at the main critiisism is hand eye coordination which needs adjusting to. Michael's post on the quality dentist magnifiers is of interest and I think is the way to go.In the meantime I am modifying my microscope so at least it can be used by simply adding a taller pole. Unfortunately reducing a 500mm solid aluminium pole by 0.5mm to fit was made very difficult as I could not use my 8 inch lathe but have files and sanded (with mask on0 and am nearly there. not sure I understand Neis rejection of the illuminated magnifier having latency, it would introduce likely distortion but not latency 9correct me if i am wrong).

Next problem how to get a dentists pair of magnifiers....I will phone my local dentist up and see if they are helpful.

Regards

Chris

Thread: Anyone know where I can get hold of 'Gauge Rods'
06/09/2019 22:10:14
Posted by Jeff Dayman on 06/09/2019 14:56:17:

All good points Ian. It looks to me like this person is trying to gain skills by consensus questioning and shortcuts rather than watching a mentor and learning himself by practice. Clearly basic measurements are not understood. I'm not sure why so many are still trying to help this person with these oddball and unnecessary methods he brings up.

Jeff it is it more the case you are joining in as the bully you evidently are. I am a member of a horological forum and have the personal guidance od a top craftsman. I come to this forum to improve my basic machining skills which I am grateful for. When such advice is above that asked for I politely move on. What do you mean Jeff basic measurements are not understood I could easily reveal my advisor who has been US craftsman of the year and is respected as top guy on the best known horological forum. Think what you like Jeff its simple I have the advice from a top dog , I listen to other opinions but not usually from the same league. The only way any one becomes really good is by scacrifice, I guess I have to put up with the likes of your rudeness to get the nice guys help...certainly no quick way.

Why not just be polite voice your opinion and except others have a right to differ. You can be better than your post

Chris

Thread: Any one used a digital microscope for micro turning on a lathe
06/09/2019 12:44:23
Posted by Ian Parkin on 06/09/2019 12:41:00:

Well as i said it stays where its put

its sprung and counterbalanced if you knock it it moves but it swings every which way and lifts up or down and stays where you want it

I think this one was Very expensive new designed for a large heavy monitor on a desk

Edited By Ian Parkin on 06/09/2019 12:41:46

Thanks Ian certainly then a viable option / alternative.

Chris

06/09/2019 12:42:15
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 06/09/2019 12:27:36:

Chris,

If you have the space avaiable: You could build an 'overhead' and mount that scope [inverted on its column] very conveniently.

MichaelG.

.

Examples of overheads for horological lathes will be found in this book:

**LINK**

... and in a multitude of other locations.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 06/09/2019 12:32:16

Thanks Michael I have that book and as good as it is I cannot at a quick look find much by way of microscope stands..probably me though.

Chris

06/09/2019 12:35:52
Posted by Ian Parkin on 06/09/2019 12:26:31:

This my scope mounted on a monitor stand clamped to the ceiling joists its easily moved to wherever i need it

as i recall this was <£20 on eBay and stays where its put

This scope has a working distance of 7 inches from the ring light and fills the frame with my fingernail

63070e6f-eaeb-487c-bf2c-57f363df1561.jpeg

b0b03cb3-743e-4c2a-bc60-4ee2268dd4a6.jpeg

f0aa50e2-18b7-418f-a323-cedc832e40e0.jpeg

Edited By Ian Parkin on 06/09/2019 12:28:02

Great idea to adapt the TV boom Ian . How wibbly wobbly is it in use?

Chris

06/09/2019 12:19:07

 

The Sherline 8 inch being a tiny lathe mounted on a board on in my case rubber feet affords I guess the opportunity to just replace the stands upright with a taller inch pole and maybe rebate the board to allow the scope to sit on top of the work. This would be both cheap and flexible...now that might be worth a shot. Chrisscopeand lathe.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited By Chris TickTock on 06/09/2019 12:34:09

06/09/2019 12:12:36
Posted by John Haine on 06/09/2019 12:02:09:
Posted by Chris TickTock on 06/09/2019 11:56:48:

.............. The most flexible use would to get a boom but would this be a serious issue in terms of moving when working???

................

For heaven's sake, why don't you just try it, then you can tell us all!

Possibly John because they are an expensive item that would be worth seeking the opinion of others on first.

Chris

06/09/2019 11:56:48

OK generally it seems the old method of using the stereo microscope is the safer route to take especially if like me you already have one. Mine has a mag of up to x35. The most flexible use would to get a boom but would this be a serious issue in terms of moving when working???

Like Phil I too would appreciate what other have done to mount their stereo microscopes. In the case of the Sherline 8 inch lathe Sherline used to offer a scope with mount but it was discontinued in i think 2013. The disadvantage with a fixed mounting point may be if you hold the stock in collets or something else rendering the scope in the wrong position. How likely that is I as yet do not know.

Chris

06/09/2019 10:52:04

Thanks Guys I really appreciate posts and need time to reflect on points.

Regards

Chris

Thread: Why does the micrometer have a second knurled segment
06/09/2019 10:32:32
Posted by Paul Kemp on 05/09/2019 21:57:45:
Posted by Chris TickTock on 05/09/2019 21:30:41:
Posted by David Standing 1 on 05/09/2019 17:39:07:
Posted by MadMike on 05/09/2019 14:42:44:

Not wishing to be controversial, but is this a serious question?

I have suggested useful reading material to Chris on more than one occasion, he has not responded.

Book 6 in the Workshop Practice series, Measuring and Marking Materials, by Ivan Law, would answer this question too.

The preferred option appears to be to bombard the forum with questions instead.

Thanks MadMike, I will endeavor to make all future posts at your elevated level.

Chris

Chris,

With the greatest respect I have followed many of your question posts and the answers which seem to be perfectly valid. However the way your responses read to me seem to dispute most suggestions as not appropriate according to your answers already gained from your valued advisor. I am sure you do not really intend to come across as I interpret your responses and there is nothing wrong with questioning to properly evaluate a method or process but the way you do this perhaps does not encourage people to respond?

Paul.

Paul many times I have asked a question which has been answered by suggesting another method. OK I get this is well intentioned opinion but if its not answering my question it is not helpful, I am polite but move on. To me a forum is like a pub some nice people and some you would rather avoid. Just look at the responses to this post the humour is perfectly acceptable but other comments not so. Frankly I see no escuse for rudeness but online forums seem to give cover to the coward who uses rudesness from a distance and huddles together with those of similar disposition. Most here are fine those that spoil for a fight don't bother answering my posts...it really won't bother me.

Chris

Thread: Any one used a digital microscope for micro turning on a lathe
06/09/2019 09:18:02

Hi Guys, Without magnification turning a balance staff on a standard micro lathe is probably impossible. So given there now are digital magnifiers has anyone found use of these for such machining. Alternatively connecting a stereo microscope with a boom is an option. I do have a stereo microscope on a stand and at the moment are assessing which way to go.

Regards

Chris

Thread: Why does the micrometer have a second knurled segment
05/09/2019 21:30:41
Posted by David Standing 1 on 05/09/2019 17:39:07:
Posted by MadMike on 05/09/2019 14:42:44:

Not wishing to be controversial, but is this a serious question?

 

I have suggested useful reading material to Chris on more than one occasion, he has not responded.

Book 6 in the Workshop Practice series, Measuring and Marking Materials, by Ivan Law, would answer this question too.

The preferred option appears to be to bombard the forum with questions instead.

 

Thanks MadMike, May I in return to your reading recommendation suggest you read the bible and turn the other cheek the next time I post not to your obviously elevated taste.

Chris

Edited By Chris TickTock on 05/09/2019 21:45:57

Edited By Chris TickTock on 05/09/2019 21:49:40

05/09/2019 17:37:02
Posted by Howard Lewis on 05/09/2019 17:26:57:

A lot of people say that the Ratchet should be turned until it has clicked three times, to give a consistent pressure.

The narrow knurled ring set into the frame of the micrometer, is used to lock a reading.

In this way, then reading can be retained when the mic is removed; or it can be used a Go/No Go gauge.

Howard

Thanks howard I forgot to ask what the narrow ring was for..thanks mate.

Chris

Thread: Anyone know where I can get hold of 'Gauge Rods'
05/09/2019 16:19:39

Hi guys in case anyone is interested just got reply from my horological expert he says as I suggested that block gauges are great for many applications but with the micro sizes involved with balance staff machining block gauges are arkward and have limited sizes.

Regards

Chris

Thread: Why does the micrometer have a second knurled segment
05/09/2019 16:01:44

Thanks Guys 3 helpful answers all helpful especially Martin's point of holding the mic in one hand which being a greenhorn I overlooked.

Chris

Thread: Anyone know where I can get hold of 'Gauge Rods'
05/09/2019 15:54:03
Posted by Andrew Johnston on 05/09/2019 14:23:37:
Posted by Chris TickTock on 05/09/2019 14:04:43:

To date apart from disagreeing on him using WD40 as a cpolant for I think brass he said I have ended up always agreeing with him in the end. WD40 will gum up the lathe if your not careful is my thinking same as on clocks...

Can't imagine why you'd need to use WD40, or anything else, on brass. I always machine brass dry, with one exception. That being CNC engraving where the sole purpose of the flood coolant is to wash away the fine swarf. On something like this:

nameplates brass me.jpg

The only time I use WD40 is for manual drilling of aluminium alloy to prevent the swarf sticking to the drill.

Andrew

Nice work Andrew, yes your'e probably right it was aluminium on reflection he suggested WD40 but on the lathe which is a no, no for me any how. I have also just measured the segment lengths using the micrometer the pivots on the balance staff I have to hand .the pivots are a .scary 0.0046 (imperial).

Chris

Thread: Why does the micrometer have a second knurled segment
05/09/2019 14:23:02

Hi just thought it time to make sure I can read a micrometer well. So first things first why the ratchet....answer to stop over tightening and ensure even force on jaws. So why have the second knurled segment which is tempting to use...would it not be better not to have this/

Chrismorreandwrightmicrometer.jpg

Thread: Anyone know where I can get hold of 'Gauge Rods'
05/09/2019 14:04:43
Posted by JasonB on 05/09/2019 13:21:33:

As has been said you can use the topslide handwheel or a DRO if you have one.

Lets say the photo is a 0.221" dia rod. I would touch my tool against the lefthand shoulder and set the handwheel dial to 21. Then turn the smaller diameter stopping when the handwheel was on zero and just over two full turns away.

Alternative is to hold the rod or block against the left hand shoulder and bring the tool up to touch the rod where you would then set dial to zero, you then turn the smaller dia stopping at zero. You can also use a finished part as the gauge if you want one to slip onto the spigot and both ends flush.

Both these methods would be better than comparing by eye or feel.

Thanks Jason I have noted your method. It would have to be argued why is my advisor not just using the hand wheels on the lathe as you suggest? I will ask him and have every confidence there is a reason as he is a renowned expert on the Sherline lathe and micro machining. Unfortunately I get bits and pieces fed to me then think on it and challenge why. To date apart from disagreeing on him using WD40 as a cpolant for I think brass he said I have ended up always agreeing with him in the end. WD40 will gum up the lathe if your not careful is my thinking same as on clocks, but if your careful even that would be fine.

Regards

Chris

I don't have gauge blocks so my suggested sizes may not be what comes in a set.

Edited By JasonB on 05/09/2019 13:22:42

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