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Member postings for Steve Neighbour

Here is a list of all the postings Steve Neighbour has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Recommendations for rust prevention?
05/11/2021 16:08:34

I have used Loctite SF7803 surface treatment for some time, it is very effective at preventing corrosion, easily applied to any ferrous metal and leaves a surface film of less that a few microns.

Steve

Thread: The Workshop Progress Thread 2021
29/06/2021 22:18:47

Did you just wonder if Model Engineering is "cheap" ?

I always tell swmbo it is really cheap wink 2 (a lot less than her gardening and other hobbies)

Anyone think different ? probably be wise to secret

Thread: Stupid moment
26/05/2021 21:38:44

How many times have I been told (and watched YouTube from folk like Adès workshop and Blondiehacks) that drone on about never ever ever try and remove swarf with fingers when the Lathe is running.

So I now know that alluminium swarf in long strands is much better than razor wire at shredding skin

Be warned !!

Thread: Mitutoyo Digital Callipers
25/05/2021 23:18:56

Agree, there are far too many 'fakes' for sale online.

It is not unreasonable to seek out value for money, as even 100% genuine products can vary considerably in cost, so the BIG question is:

How can you guarantee your not paying a 'genuine price' for what appears to be a 'genuine' product - only to find out it is still a 'fake' ?

Thread: Hand cleaner
12/05/2021 10:57:44

+1 for Rozalex Zorange £8.30/litre - lasts for AGES

best hand cleaner I've ever used, and smells good enough to eat (probably not a good idea through) smiley

Thread: Home workshop insurance.
06/05/2021 10:40:13

Just had a conversation with our usual House contents insurer, interestingly the 'agent' had no idea what a 'home workshop' was, or even seemed to care tbh !!

My workshop is a standard 'domestic' garage, the contents are covered up to a max of £1k (subject to any excesses) which doesn't scratch the surface of the value of my machinery (Lathe, Mill, bench drill, band saw, compressor, and numerous tools and other equipment)

I asked if this can be increased, they said "up to a max of £5k and at a premium increase of £40/month" disgust

Just got a quote from Walker Midgley for £10k plus additional model cover, for £107/year which I thought was reasonable - just need to read the small print before I commit !!

Any thoughts from the wiser members ?

Thread: Repair It? Wossat Mean, Like?
04/05/2021 13:17:45
Posted by J Hancock on 04/05/2021 12:48:05:

Calculating the REAL running time of many of these items , cars included, can also bring on a heart attack.

One wash a day , is still only 365 hours in a year !

9,000 miles/yr in the car about 300 hours, etc !

Definitely cardiac zone !!

My car has 82,700 on the clock, and the trip function tells me I've averaged 35mph over that distance, so that equates to 2,262 hours of driving, if I add in 5% for engine run time while not driving (prob generous) that then gives 2,480 hours on the engine. that's approaching 298 million revolutions on the crankshaft (at a nominal 2,000 rpm)

Ok, I'll get my anorak crook

Steve

Thread: Magnetic bases - stored on or off?
03/04/2021 20:24:57

When mine arrived from the supplier, they were in the OFF state, and one assumes they had been in that condition since manufacture

On that basis, I would vote for keeping OFF when not being used !

Steve

Thread: There may be a delay in some deliveries ...
30/03/2021 09:17:47

Its not untypical for a single shipping container transit cost from China to UK to cost approx $5,000 one way (assuming 50 lathes, thats a mere $100/lathe)

So 20,000 containers = $100 million revenue for Evergreen

Think I might sell my house and buy me a container ship wink 2

Thread: Power supply companies.
30/03/2021 08:37:34

Try OVO energy . . never had any issues (yet !!)

Thread: New member, N. Gloucestershire.
26/03/2021 20:02:35
Posted by Paul Wakefield 1 on 26/03/2021 16:34:16:

Hi from a long-term lurker on these forums. I’ve finally broken cover simply in order to pursue an item in the classified section... hopefully!

I’ve collected a lathe, a mill and a lot of hand tools over the years although my main interest has remained a fascination with things that fly, which is something I’ve been involved with since short trouser days.

Now, with more time on my hands I’d love to know more about how to set up the lathe and mill, although I have also found that tackling a specific job is a sure way to improve knowledge. The present mini-job on the Little John is a quill collar for the Mill to enable a DRO to be fitted. Prior to that it was four shuttle valves for a model vectored thrust system.

Time flies in the workshop!

Paulbw.

Hi Paul,

Sent you a PM

Steve

Thread: Was Draw Filing ever a chargeable offence in the RAF?
25/03/2021 15:49:27
Posted by Ian Hewson on 25/03/2021 13:35:26:

Hi Steve

Your post brought back memories - I served my ESI 'indentured' apprenticeship with SEEB (Electricity Board in Kent, and spent the first year at their purpose built training school (boot camp) near Dover.

I made a complete set of hand tools, and a barn type tool box to keep them in, (I still have most of them) and spent many hours during the hard labour lessons draw filing huge lumps of black metal . . but, probably like you, I also learnt to use a lathe, drill press, gas/arc welding, heat treatment, cutting, and a host of other 'workshop' techniques.

Those were the days, apprenticeships seem to have fallen by the wayside. I stayed in the industry all my working life

All that I learned, coupled with my Grandfathers teachings (he was a R&D tool maker) laid the foundation for my own retirement 'hobby', I'm lucky to have a well kitted out workshop and a passion for 'anything' metal engineering, but mostly steam models

My better half thinks I would be a 'Fred Dibnah' with a full size engine given half a chance - hmm now there's a thought !!!!

My tools made at the training workshop are still wrapped in the greased cloth I brought them home in, too much time and effort in getting them to the standard the instructors wanted to spoil them by actually using them.

We were not allowed to use machines apart from the drills, YEB did not wants us to use them. Rather a pity as the shop was full of mills, lathes and a large jig borer.

Funnily enough my father was a toolmaker who learned his trade on cameras at Kershaws in Leeds, he worked on marking out Centurion tank turrets at Barnbow, then sowing machines special applications for Singers.

I guess the apprenticeships we both 'served' were pretty similar in format, I suppose all the 12 'Area Elec Boards' back in the 70's followed a very similar curriculum.

I had to nip out to the workshop and look at what I still have, I found a pair of mole grips, Junior and 12" hacksaw, a pipe wrench, a conduit diestock holder, a couple of wooden handled screwdrivers, a cold chisel, and a drill gauge, all in a sheet steel barn tool box stamped with my apprentice No '67' . . .but alas no cuddly toy !!

I also remember there was 215 hopefully spotty 16 year olds in my first year, by the start of my 2nd year that had dropped to just under 100, and when I 'passed out' there was just 71 left to be 'deployed' to the districts to then spend another year 'learning' how to make tea properly for the 'old hands' - haha !!

I find it quite sad that very few companies offer Engineering apprenticeships now, maybe with the exception of the likes of Rolls Royce and BAE . . but I imagine its all new fangled digital computer controlled, with hand tools being rarely used !!

25/03/2021 13:20:46
Posted by Ian Hewson on 24/03/2021 23:49:57:

As an apprentice electrician at the YEB in 1959, we were sent for 6 months training in the apprentice shop at ROF Barnbow, Leeds.
We were told then that draw filling was bad practice and not allowed, but never told why.

One of the things I did learn there was to use a machine to do the heavy work if possible.

It was years before the penny dropped for the YEB that it was cheaper for us to use electric drills for holes than hammer and chisel. Still keep a star drill for 1/2 inch bolts to remind me.

Your post brought back memories - I served my ESI 'indentured' apprenticeship with SEEB (Electricity Board in Kent, and spent the first year at their purpose built training school (boot camp) near Dover.

I made a complete set of hand tools, and a barn type tool box to keep them in, (I still have most of them) and spent many hours during the hard labour lessons draw filing huge lumps of black metal . . but, probably like you, I also learnt to use a lathe, drill press, gas/arc welding, heat treatment, cutting, and a host of other 'workshop' techniques.

Those were the days, apprenticeships seem to have fallen by the wayside. I stayed in the industry all my working life

All that I learned, coupled with my Grandfathers teachings (he was a R&D tool maker) laid the foundation for my own retirement 'hobby', I'm lucky to have a well kitted out workshop and a passion for 'anything' metal engineering, but mostly steam models

My better half thinks I would be a 'Fred Dibnah' with a full size engine given half a chance - hmm now there's a thought !!!!

Steve

Thread: Which lathe to purchase
25/03/2021 12:57:19
Posted by Michael Ford 6 on 24/03/2021 15:05:55:

"I have been scanning youtube and have discounted the chinese mini lathes as they all appear to need loads of rectification work before you can use them so I have set a budget of £1500 hoping I can find either a new or secondhand lathe that will give me the accuracy I am looking for.

I have looked at the Chester DB8VS also sold under other names I believe, and have found good reviews ??

Any advice would be appreciated

I really don't understand why so many folk on here discredit 'Chinese' Lathes, and assume they will automatically be poorly made - that was possibly true a few years ago, I suppose there will still be one or two 'dud' ones, but generally as a whole Chinese manufacturing has improved considerably.

When looking for a Lathe of my own, I spent hours trawling the markets trying to find the perfect little used machine that met my budget without much success, one thing I did learn is the 2nd hand market is flooded with too many 'very good condition, little used, too good to be true' British/American Lathes that are actually in poor condition and would cost a fortune to restore, often with very hard to find spares

Chinese Lathes

Pros'

  • They are 'mostly' highly accurate 0.01mm (1 thou) (depends on make/model)
  • Spares (if needed) are readily available
  • Accessories are wide ranging and plentiful
  • Almost all are fitted with needle roller bearings to the headstock (unlike Myford etc)
  • They are available in both Metric and Imperial versions
  • They have wide speed ranges (mine has 30 - 2250 rpm)
  • You get a lot more for your money
  •  

Cons

  • The instruction manual is often written in poor Engrish (good for a chuckle though)
  • Delivery (at the moment for new) can be weeks or even months due to supply issues
  • Some of the castings (rough edges) can be very poor, but usually it's where it doesn't matter 'too' much
  • Electrics/Electronic controls (on some brands) can leave a lot to be desired

Anyway, the above is far from definitive, it is based on my own experiences to date, (as you may guess) I own a Chinese Lathe, it has out performed all of my expectations, is (so far) proving to be very reliable

Good luck with your search, and what ever you finally chose, I'm sure it will serve you well

Steve

Edited By Steve Neighbour on 25/03/2021 12:58:49

Thread: Plumbing - 'polarity' of tails.
14/03/2021 14:39:56

Nuts, solder, swaging, compression fittings ??

All would be alien to a modern 2021 plumber, they pretty much all use push-fit (copper or plastic tube) these days.

Working on a large extension for a family member at the moment and all the central heating and hot/cold water is plastic with push-fit fittings.

Except for gas, that is still soldered copper or threaded steel, but usually hdpe (high density poly ethylene) in the street.

Thread: Aldi Scheppach bandsaw
13/03/2021 22:26:51
Posted by AJW on 13/03/2021 21:15:51:

I had a look on the saw and base and couldn't find any reference to China so scrutinized the box, nothing except on the bottom - Made in China! Almost as though it was trying to be hidden!

Maybe it's just the box that is made in China wink

13/03/2021 18:24:59
Posted by Bill Phinn on 13/03/2021 18:11:44:
Posted by Steve Neighbour on 13/03/2021 17:27:47:

There is nothing wrong with machines 'made in China'

You have to remember the warranty and service is provided by a German company, based in Germany, so all their machines will be made to German specifications and standards

Why do so many on here assume that everything that is 'made in China' must automatically be crap !!!

It looks like you may have radically misconstrued my contribution to this thread, Steve.

Bill, I didn't say that YOU think 'made in China' is crap, I was just throwing in a tease, knowing that anything Chinese seems to get slated on here as being cheap and of poor quality.

From my own experiences (so far) it is generally well made, but not to British, German or Japanese standards, but non-the-less acceptable when you take into account the cost !!

The Scheppach bandsaw as sold by Aldi is no exception, it performs very well, and so far has cut everything I have thrown at it accurately enough not to cause me any concern

Cheers, Steve

Thread: chinese lathe
13/03/2021 17:33:54
Posted by Howard Lewis on 13/03/2021 17:23:50:

On my mini lathe, and my big one (12" swing over bed Warco BH600 / Chester Craftsman lookalike ) that is how the Saddle and Tailstock locate.

Saddle locates on Front prismatic way and sits on Rear flat way.

Tailstock locates on Rear prismatic way and sits on Fronf flat way.

Looks as if you have a wiper missing from the Prismatic side of the Saddle.

Possibly Warco or Chester Hobbystore can provide replacement?

Howard

Just looked at my own Warco WM250 (made in the Weiss factory in Shenzen, China) and the carriage locates exactly as the above members have described, so yours is correct

Re missing bedway wiper, you need to rectify that asap or swaf will get inbetween the carriage and bed and cause damage - you can make your own bed wipers easily, just get hold of some 3-4mm dense felt

Thread: Aldi Scheppach bandsaw
13/03/2021 17:27:47
Posted by Bill Phinn on 13/03/2021 13:21:56:
Posted by Steve Neighbour on 13/03/2021 07:28:02:

It is made in Germany

It says only the word "Germany" in big letters on my box. In much smaller letters it says "made in China".

There is nothing wrong with machines 'made in China'

You have to remember the warranty and service is provided by a German company, based in Germany, so all their machines will be made to German specifications and standards

Why do so many on here assume that everything that is 'made in China' must automatically be crap !!!

13/03/2021 07:28:02

+1 for the Sheppach band saw from Aldi.

It is made in Germany, all metal construction (apart from the drive wheel covers) it is fairly quiet, has 6 speeds, and cuts surprisingly accurately.

My only criticism is the work holding clamp, which doesn't always hold stock squarely.

Overall for £115 it is a bargain and recommended

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