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Member postings for John Paton 1

Here is a list of all the postings John Paton 1 has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Help identify tool inserts please
01/10/2018 10:14:25

Thanks (and apologies) all - now added to my album. Learning all the time!

Edited By John Paton 1 on 01/10/2018 10:15:36

01/10/2018 09:27:20

and a smaller version of the original photo in case the file size was too large

01/10/2018 09:22:57

IMG_1108.JPG

David, a picture of the 'sides' was included in my post and still shows for me when I open my original post. I now attach a top view. Do I need to upload these to the gallery (if they are not displayed when you read my posting)?

Thread: More powerful batteries to make steam?
01/10/2018 09:13:45

Interesting point (re 'bomb'.

I have a small Microflame jewelers' blowtorch that electrolyses distilled water to fuel it. From what I can see it delivers a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen from the electrolysis tank bubbled through a robust secondary storage / pressure tank (part filled with either Isopropyl Alcohol or Acetone) and has a flash arrestor in the torch handle. I think it relies upon the push fit rubber hose as a safety valve and relatively small volume to prevent major explosion.

The nozzle is a hypodermic needle and yes, when it blows back it can be exciting - the needle gets blown clean off and doesn't need to be pointing towards anybody! On more than one occasion the needle has hit the far wall of the workshop. (great bit of kit for fine work though with very focussed, intense flame)

The start of a flashback can be anticipated as the needle glows red hot and the hot bit creeps back along the needle with a hissing sound until there is a cloud 'crack' and the needle goes flying. At least the needle will be sterile!

More to the point, I have to presume that even a 'perfect mix' of hydrogen and oxygen requires a source of heat to initiate explosion.

Thread: Help identify tool inserts please
01/10/2018 08:42:39

Amongst my collection of tool inserts I have a number of these. The tip shape / cutting angles look useful but I have been unable to find a suitable holder. Do any of you know what make/ type of holder they will fit?

The cross sectional sizes of the three different insert tips are:

3.1w x 5.2h x 16 long; 5.1w x 6.27h x 22 long ; and 8.12w x 7.22 h x 25 long and the 'key indent' on their bottom edges is 3.5mm diameter.

Any help appreciated as the tip geometry looks sharper and more conventional than many of the current inserts and and may therefore be better suited to the lighter cutting speeds and feeds of model engineering lathes.The V point (thread cutting) tips look especially useful.

Thread: 3 in 1 sheetmetal bender
14/09/2018 21:58:05

I have been impressed with what can be done on this machine, It is compact but the drive gear tooth depth on the rolls limits the thickness they can be asked to handle (I don't go over 1mm thick)

I don't have space for several or larger bending tools so am very happy with it. It has been a godsend when making trim components for my kit car and the guillotine makes a much neater job than tinsnips if adjusted correctly.

What I would like is a set of blades for the folder part with slightlyradiussed tips rather than sharp ends, as the sharp angle can cause ally to fracture along the bend on 90 degree folds.

Thread: How to cut a 2mm slot in this?
13/09/2018 18:30:34
Posted by John Paton 1 on 13/09/2018 17:51:26:

Taking account of your latest post the answer is blindingly obvious. Using jigsaw cut a 6mm slot about 60mm long across the cupboard door. Then use a 100mm long pan head screw through th door with penny washers each side and bolt through th fridge door, adjusting with nuts to each side of the fridge door. Cut off excess length of bolt with diamond blade in your Dremel or leave over length if you don't have one. The above in stainless steel but if you only have in ferrous paint liberally in whatever colour hammerite you have in an old tin.

This solution might not be as elegant as some suggested but it will help demonstrate to others the importance of a fully equipped and up to date workshop. Blacksmithing solutions are fine in rustic environments but the modern home demands more sophisticated tooling to provide the elegant solutions demanded!

Oh and I meant to add, and how do we get others to understand our real workshop requirements? 😉

13/09/2018 17:51:26

Taking account of your latest post the answer is blindingly obvious. Using jigsaw cut a 6mm slot about 60mm long across the cupboard door. Then use a 100mm long pan head screw through th door with penny washers each side and bolt through th fridge door, adjusting with nuts to each side of the fridge door. Cut off excess length of bolt with diamond blade in your Dremel or leave over length if you don't have one. The above in stainless steel but if you only have in ferrous paint liberally in whatever colour hammerite you have in an old tin.

This solution might not be as elegant as some suggested but it will help demonstrate to others the importance of a fully equipped and up to date workshop. Blacksmithing solutions are fine in rustic environments but the modern home demands more sophisticated tooling to provide the elegant solutions demanded!

Thread: Best type of material to use for beginners
03/09/2018 17:40:33

My advice would be to look around local industrial estates and see if you can find a firm who machines round bar.

Then explain what you are doing and ask nicely if they 'scrap bar ends' of free cutting mild steel in their scrap bin.

I find some firms really helpful and let you fetch out what you want from the skip. One firm gave me a goodly bundle of lovely10mm dia bar ends about 200mm long which get used for all sorts of things - machines a dream!

Alloy and plastics can be a bit more difficult to find and are very variable in how they machine so are not so good for a complete beginner. Same approach however will often produce the goods.

Thread: Marconi F3049-02 : Joystick Controller
23/08/2018 20:53:20

Useful 'further info' above. The D Gill referred to is indeed my friends Dad but I still doubt my friend will be able to answer the question. (he is a practical chap but didn't work for Marconi)

My uncle worked on radar but more from a mechanical standpoint and whilst he has some knowledge of the trackball (ball made by a maker of snooker balls!) and is aware of the joystick as used for anti aircraft missiles (using radar tracking) he does not know anyone involved with the electronics of that.


I will ask a couple of my other 'ex Marconi' friends if they know of the joystick - one worked on computers and the other on military radio communications equipment so might not have ventured into radar area. As far as I know neither of my fiends worked at the Billericay 'Special Projects' unit but this doesn't mean they didn't come across the joystick in other applications or know an electronics colleague who worked at Billericay. I will speak to them and find out if they have a lead for you.

23/08/2018 20:00:45

Useful 'further info' above. The D Gill referred to is my friends Dad but I still doubt my friend will be able to answer the question. (he is a practical chap but didn't work for Marconi)

I will ask a couple of my other 'ex Marconi' friends if they know of the joystick - one worked on computers and the other on military radio communications equipment so might not have ventured into radar area. My uncle worked on radar but more from a mechanical standpoint. As far as I know none worked at the Billericay 'Special Projects' unit but this doesn't mean they didn't come across the joystick in other applications.

23/08/2018 09:25:28

I suggest you try contacting Chelmsford Science and Engineering Society, pretty likely there will an old boy still alive who worked on these. The society has a small museum and doubtless is in contact with Marconi veterans.

I think I know the son of D Gill (in the photo on your link) but rather doubt he would be familiar with that particular piece of kit.

Thread: Eclipse magnetic chuck/baseplate
11/08/2018 14:34:30

Sparky, I agree with Tim

Seems a shame to risk damaging a decent chuck (unless it has already been subjected to a heavy life) . arcing from the earth connection and weld splatter would be the most obvious causes of damage unless welds run off the edge of the workpiece onto the chuck itself. Most welding benches get an angle grinder run over them from time to time to clean them up - not what you would want to do to a precision chuck (or to a decent vice for that matter).

If needing to use the magnetic chuck I would be tempted to try putting a thin sheet of stainless or alloy over the magnetic chuck, using that as the earth sheet. This will prevent arcing and splatter from damaging the surface of the chuck, while (hopefully) allowing sufficient magnetic force to transmit through the sheet to restrain the work piece overlying it. The top of the thin sheet will then be the item which gets defaced first.

Much cheaper is a sheet of 2mm mild steel and a couple of the 45/90 degree welders magnetic clamps to hold the work. You could clamp the MS plate to the chuck if the chuck in an important feature of your bench set up for other reasons.

Thread: Mystery French Medical ? Item
10/08/2018 13:28:22

Fowlers Fury - that is interesting and a little worrying. I use ether both for 'pepping up' stale fuel for model diesel engines and also in the form of easy start for petrol engines.

How much do you need to breathe in to cause a heart problem?

Cheers

John

Thread: Colchester Chipmaster what to check for
10/08/2018 10:50:30

Hope it all goes well Andrew - if it turns out to be as described it should be a lovely lathe for the money. I used one at the local College when doing an evening course. Although modest capacity for the machine size, the speed control and general solidity made it a true delight to use.

As you have already discovered, the perceived wisdom on Chipmasters is that the variable speed drive is the crucial element, if thats duff the machine has very little value and its cheaper to buy another machine than to replace the drive.

I imagine it is almost impossible to check the drive without having the machine run at high and low speed.

Do let us know how it turns out, hopefully pure magic for you!

John

Thread: Threaded rod into brass tube
08/08/2018 19:25:05

You might just be wasting time - the cats round here jump a 7ft high wooden fence with ease and happily walk along the top of it. You might try two wires along the top hooked to a domestic type electric fence unit. Other than that the other remedies are probably more effective.

We always find it distressing that, having made a wildlife friendly garden, village cats come in and hoover up the fledgeling birds once they leave the nest - wrens, robins, sparrows, blackbirds and thrushes rarely survive their first two weeks out of the nest.

08/08/2018 19:25:02

You might just be wasting time - the cats round here jump a 7ft high wooden fence with ease and happily walk along the top of it. You might try two wires along the top hooked to a domestic type electric fence unit. Other than that the other remedies are probably more effective.

We always find it distressing that, having made a wildlife friendly garden, village cats come in and hoover up the fledgeling birds once they leave the nest - wrens, robins, sparrows, blackbirds and thrushes rarely survive their first two weeks out of the nest.

Thread: Having trouble turning grooves
06/08/2018 09:35:21

Thanks Michael - I found that inked document useful too. It can live alongside my Zeus Tables!

It amazing how often I encounter bolts with an unfamiliar thread.

John

Thread: Inverter Drives for Motors
03/08/2018 13:27:34

Nick, Neal I agree with you both but from previous posts on other threads it strikes me that many people are only partly aware of the issues.

Hopefully Barry Chamberlain's article will address some of the aspects I have listed.

Perhaps this thread will elicit observations from others on various points and maybe stimulate someone like Barry to produce a booklet in the Workshop Practice Series to supplement guidance on motors.

03/08/2018 11:15:56

There have been a number of posts arising from members having difficulty with Inverter / Variable Frequency Drives.

These devices have a number of characteristics which can trap the unwary and it would be helpful for these to be explored and pulled together in one place, hopefully in terms that can be easily understood by less technically informed members of our community.

This might already be met by reference to a book or learned paper with which I for one am unfamiliar!

To set the ball rolling I list below some of the issues that I think worthy of highlighting:

1. Safety

a. nature of their output and requirements of cabling and earth bonding.

b. Power stored in the drive (power capacitors) and residual power after mains power is lost. How to ensure it is powered down before diving into the electrics.

c. Effect of using conventional 'No Volts release' starters with inverter drives - damage to capacitors, how to prevent machines from self restarting after power loss, how to wire in emergency stop switches.

d. Fire risks and fires from failing power capacitors. Non combustible mounting boards, dust free ventilation and distance from combustible surfaces.

e. Separation of power and extra low voltage (signal / control) wiring.

2. Compliance with Building Regulations, IEE Regs and insurers requirements.

a. Fixed wiring or plugged connections.

b. RCD protection and associated issues

c. testing and certification

3. Practical Application to Machine Motors

a. Appropriate motors and how to identify them.

b. Use of one drive to feed more than one machine (or not)

c. Use of multiple motors on one machine (eg suds pumps and power feed drives) operating at different rotational speeds.

d. Star or Delta configuration and what inverters will work with them.

e. How to control overheating of motors (ability to 'self cool' when revs are reduced, loss of torque if voltage is reduced at lower frequencies) Reliable rules of thumb.

f. How to establish and input control and protective settings appropriate to you motor/ machine setup

g. How to control speed at either the inverter or with remote controller (potentiometer)

h. Selection ( electrical, mechanical characteristics, 'suds proofing' and mounting speed control potentiometer on your machine. Suitable plug and socket connectors for ELV wiring.

i. How to use one inverter to feed more than one machine (or not)

j. How to establish safe 'overspeed' of your motor / machine by setting frequencies above 50 Hz. Appropriate rules of thumb. (Chuck explosion, grinding wheel failure, lubrication / bearing failure)

k. Appropriate acceleration and deceleration settings, electric braking and switching between forward and reverse.

l. Trouble shooting, Fault codes and how to address their cause.

m. Sources of inverters and pitfalls.

n. Need to reform capacitors and how to do this (when inverters have been unused for 2 or more years). Implications of not doing this.

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