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Member postings for Mick B1

Here is a list of all the postings Mick B1 has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: What Did You Do Today 2020
09/05/2020 11:21:47
Posted by Nicholas Farr on 09/05/2020 11:10:28:

Hi Mick B1, that's a neat and simple way of doing it.

Regards Nick.

Ta. I'd thought I'd have to do it with trig. Sometimes it takes me a while to think of the simple way... smiley

09/05/2020 09:42:01

Well, yesterday really.

Funny bracket on a classic vehicle for a bloke down the railway. He made an alli sand casting of the original and wanted me to drill the angled hole.

img_20200508_124909.jpg

He lent me an original to set up on, so I stuck it in the vice on the swivel vertical slide, then fiddled till I could get an 8mm drill through the 'ole without touching. Turned out to be about 53 degrees, but I dunno exactly 'cos the angle calibration on the swivel stops at 50. There's an added complication in that the hole's tapered, so I eyed-up the big-end clearance around the drill as equal all round as near as I could see - should be within a few thou. There were just 2 to do, and the castings were very slightly different, so there was little point in trying for a fully-repeatable setup.

Whether the hole taper needs to be replicated, and if so how, is gonna hafta be another story. I certainly can't see a ready way to bore a tapered hole that small, in a thing looking like that, in my setup. If somebody down the railway's got a suitable tapered reamer somewhere, that'd be neat.

Oh, social distancing of course. He dropped a polybag with the bits into my carrier, and I washed everything, plus my hands, in detergent water as soon as I got home.

smiley

Thread: VE Day - 75 years on
08/05/2020 14:22:10

I had a grandad on each side. It was a complicated story, but if events had developed much differently from the way they did, my parents would never have met.

Thread: Use of Torx Bits in Hex Skt Hd Screws
07/05/2020 16:12:51
Posted by XD 351 on 07/05/2020 14:46:45:

I think you will find the Torx bit is only driving on the tips and in a high torque situation will fail - a bit like a 12 point socket verses a hex socket on a hex bolt or nut . There is a reason why impact sockets are all hex design .

+1. When they work well, it's because Torx bits are *usually* decent steel, where hex keys explore the full spectrum of quality from end to end...

wink

Thread: New hobby lathe for retired engineer?
06/05/2020 14:39:19

Posted by Hopper on 06/05/2020 09:49:29

...

But looking at a YouTube video of the CL430 I see it is comparable (ish) size to a Myford but with the common Chinese trick of lifting the spindle up a couple of inches to increase the swing. This results in that skyscraper tailstock and the very thick carriage with thick toolpost perched up on it. Result is a narrow bed relative to tool height.

...

That may've been the case with the old-design Clarke machines, but it most certainly isn't with the more recent Warcos.

06/05/2020 09:52:40
Posted by Fred Bloggs 3 on 05/05/2020 08:59:59:
Posted by JasonB on 05/05/2020 08:08:15:

To get that 250mm swing and 30mm spindle bore you would have to start looking at a WM290 from Warco or similar siz emachine.

A WM 250 would just give the swing but a WM280 actually has a 240mm dia faceplate with a little room to spare, both these will pass 1" through the spindle

Edited By JasonB on 05/05/2020 08:21:11

Nice budget busting machines. I have looked at the Warco range, they are nice. I very likely have to decide where to compromise, budget versus capability. If I can get 98% of what I want then I will compromise on capability before budget.

FB

Another vote here for the WM250V. The powered fine crossfeed is especially useful for milling/flycutting with a vertical slide and has put back my plans to buy a mill several times now. Depends on what you're gonna do, of course - I don't do M/C stuff at present.

When I was turning for pay in the 70s, I thought well of Boxfords, but had no time for Myfords, which seemed to attract an undeserved level of reverence even then. I've had one since - for 15 years - and managed some admiration for their robust simplicity, but that got outcompeted by the capacity and standard features offered by the Warco. I've had it 5 years now, in use most days.

06/05/2020 09:44:39
Posted by Fred Bloggs 3 on 05/05/2020 08:59:59:
Posted by JasonB on 05/05/2020 08:08:15:

To get that 250mm swing and 30mm spindle bore you would have to start looking at a WM290 from Warco or similar siz emachine.

A WM 250 would just give the swing but a WM280 actually has a 240mm dia faceplate with a little room to spare, both these will pass 1" through the spindle

Edited By JasonB on 05/05/2020 08:21:11

Nice budget busting machines. I have looked at the Warco range, they are nice. I very likely have to decide where to compromise, budget versus capability. If I can get 98% of what I want then I will compromise on capability before budget.

FB

Another vote here for the WM250V. The powered fine crossfeed is especially useful for milling/flycutting with a vertical slide and has put back my plans to buy a mill several times now. Depends on what you're gonna do, of course - I don't do M/C stuff at present.

Thread: Bayonetes
05/05/2020 20:08:41

There's a very active group of bayonet collectors on the Great War Forum website in the Arms section. If you post good pics of yours - especially any markings - those folk might identify if there's anything special or collectable about them.

Edited By Mick B1 on 05/05/2020 20:09:16

Thread: Quick setting nuts
05/05/2020 18:57:25

I remember these as threaded knobs from WDS in the late 70s. They were used in drill jigs and milling fixtures - typically on quick repetition work - where a swing latch was impractical for whatever reason, sometimes with a loose-fitting ring and chain to prevent loss.

Thread: Apropos of Nothing
04/05/2020 16:50:24
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 04/05/2020 16:38:18:
Posted by Bandersnatch on 04/05/2020 16:26:34:
Posted by Mick B1 on 04/05/2020 08:44:27:

This is really all about that micro USB connector thing, isn't it?

Actually, I read it as being mostly about the standard USB connector at the other end of the wire ... the one that looks the same on both sides […]

.


dont know ... don’t those all have the seam in the metal on the bottom ?

MichaelG.

...and the bunch of bent arrows on the top. Took me a long while to notice those.

Thread: Lathe tool types
04/05/2020 16:41:38

1 & 2 : Turning tools are offset so that you can work close to the chuck or revolving tailstock centre with less risk of collision with any part of the toolpost or packing you might have underneath.

4 is more of a roughing tool with a chipbreaker ground in the top face. The idea is supposed to be that the angled face takes out any crossslide leadscrew backlash and reduces chip thickness. I've always found any such effect marginal at best.

7 & 8 seem to be variants of the same thing. 7, with no top rake or chipbreaker, might be supposed to be for brass.

Generally, I 've never really got on with such sets and have ended up grinding them to whatever shape I wanted. A simple knife tool, with a cutting edge square to the spindle axis, a few degrees - doesn't matter exactly how much - top side rake, front and side clearance, maybe 15 - 20 degrees plan trail angle, will do 90-odd % external turning work.

Here's a bunch of mine - plain knife tool on left. Most of them have some other funny shape on t'other end:

img_3733.jpg

4th from right with cranked grooving tip is for thread clearance undercuts close to the chuck.

Thread: Apropos of Nothing
04/05/2020 08:44:27

This is really all about that micro USB connector thing, isn't it? angrywink

 

I always liked this one:-

Dilbert's Theorem

Dilbert's "Salary Theorem" states that "Engineers and scientists can never earn as much as business executives and sales people."

This theorem can now be supported by mathematical proof based on the following two postulates:

 Postulate 1: Knowledge is Power.

Postulate 2: Time is Money.

As every scientist knows: Power = Work / Time.

Since Knowledge = Power, then Knowledge = Work / Time.

Since Time = Money, then Knowledge = Work / Money.

Solving for Money, we get Money = Work / Knowledge.

Thus, as Knowledge approaches zero, Money approaches infinity, regardless of the amount of work done.

Conclusion: The less you know, the more you make.

QED!

 

Edited By Mick B1 on 04/05/2020 08:47:51

Thread: Die-ing. Not literally
03/05/2020 15:32:55

Presumably the material is mild steel? Some of the not-so-mild steels like EN8 can be difficult to die-cut threads on without excessive force, with galling and a torn finish.

Thread depth on 5/16 BSF is about 29 thou per side nominal, so you could probably 0,25mm undersize without materially affecting strength.

Rocol RTD or other suitable thread cutting compound would probably help. I've used Castrol LM3 when I had nothing else, and it worked quite well.

If you're doing it in a lathe, sometimes a good deal of tailstock pressure on the die is needed to get it started. I've sometimes die-cut threads at 180 rpm on my Warco, mainly 'cos I'm too lazy to switch the belt to the lower speed range - perhaps I got away with it because they were smaller threads, on brass. If I'm hand-driving the chuck, I've got a short length of 10mm round bar that happens to fit the the chuck key square hole neatly, so I use that.

Thread: Dead centre vs. live centre
02/05/2020 19:51:35

This thread got me out into the workshop to check my old Machine Mart revolving centre - ref. my earlier post above - that I use practically whenever I need tailstock support. It runs to about 0.0005" TIR, loaded or not.

I'm not sure what sort of work within the scope of a model engineer that wouldn't be good enough for. Clock shafts? Model aircraft engine crankshafts?

The only mod I've had to do to it is tap the tail end of the taper to put in an M4 capscrew. First time I used it on the WM250V it wouldn't eject because there's no tang, so I had to lever it out with a spanner (or something) under the revolving head. That maybe where the half-thou shimmy came from, but if so I reckon I got away lightly. The old Myford Speed 10 I had when I bought it had (IIRC) a bored-through tailstock quill and I could bop it out with a bit of bar.

Edited By Mick B1 on 02/05/2020 19:57:37

02/05/2020 15:52:46
Posted by Hopper on 02/05/2020 11:53:35:

Never-Seez or MolySlip grease works well too.

Maybe it's the variant I use - Castrol LM3 - but I've found that moly/graphite grease will eventually disappear even on quite a slow-running between centres job, while tallow seems to last longer before evaporating. Got to admit I've gone over completely to a revolving tailstock centre, and a cheap one I bought 20 years ago at that.

I might stand corrected, but I suppose the main risk from the slight possible eccentricity of a revolving centre is a lobed polygon rather than a truly round diameter - and I suspect I've never made a component where that mattered critically.

Thread: eccentric strap
01/05/2020 10:18:47

I just looked at the 10V that was my first engine, and I can see the slot in the extension strap is parallel and about 10 thou wide - I can't quite insert a 6" flexible rule, which is 12 thou thick. It's also not precisely radial, so I must've done it by hand. At the time, I only had a little Unimat 3 and couldn't swing the full casting, so I cut off the shank and made one separately. I'm pretty sure I bored the strap first and then slit it with a junior hacksaw. The fit of the bore on the eccentric cam is only to avoid excessive backlash - it's prevented from riding off by a little bolt running in a groove. The engine worked well from first assembly, and still does.

Thread: Wheel Design
30/04/2020 12:28:38
Posted by Redsetter on 30/04/2020 10:38:37:

The 1/16 radius at the root of the flange is important, as that is what centralises the wheelset on the track.

The tread does not have to be tapered - a parallel tread will work equally well, possibly better,

The radius at the tip of the flange is not critical, on wheels of this size it is mainly cosmetic and can be formed freehand with a file.

Not really my subject, but I'd appreciate understanding it better.

Somebody once told me that the taper on the wheel sets the position laterally on the rail, and that contact of flange with edge of rail is a fault condition. Presumably the rail edge radius is significantly smaller than 1/16"? Because presumably the further up the flange root radius the rail contacts, the more frictive that contact will be?

30/04/2020 09:26:52

I'd think there's risk of overinterpreting the drawing to a level of precision not achievable outside an instrumentation lab.

The flange edge radius isn't specified because it's supposed to be derived from the 1/16" flange thickness at an arc where a 10 degree tangent each side touches the radius. In practice it'll be a bit over a 1/32" rad - I think I could probably work it out if I put the time into it. A more considerate draughtsman would have calculated the nominal value of that rad and put it on the drawing as a 'reference' dimension.

Then the specified 1/16" rad runs from the 10 degree tangent down to a tangent on the 3 degree taper. It would be best to blend that transition as smoothly as possible. Absence of a step is *probably* more important than the precise value of the radius, or the taper.

But hey - I know drawings better than I really know railway wheels. There will be people here who know far more.

Thread: H10 stuart Turner cylinder
29/04/2020 21:45:37

I might well have had more than that on my 10V. I used graphite-greased string packing for piston seal, and it's worked fine on air for over 20 years now.

Thread: inland seagulls
29/04/2020 15:00:10

Nobody to mug for their chips by the seaside.

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