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Member postings for Alan Charleston

Here is a list of all the postings Alan Charleston has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Emco V10p
23/09/2020 07:21:28

Hi Neil,

I used to have an EMCO V10P and foolishly sold it when I had problems with the headstock gears. Instead of paying to get them fixed I sold the EMCO and bought a Seig SC4 which I have regretted ever since.

I'm not sure about the gearbox, but when I first bought the Emco, I disconnected the wires from the 5 button electrical box without properly documenting where everything went and then couldn't put it back together again. I took the lathe motor and the box into work and showed it to the sparky who couldn't work it out and sent it out to a specialist motor guy who connected it up for me. I never did get the mill motor reconnected - instead I used a separate switch with a capacitor mounted on the wall behind the lathe.

Here is a link to the V10P manual which has a basic wiring diagram on the last page.

https://elcompptyltd.co.za/wp-content/uploads/sites/312/2019/04/Maximat-V10P-Instruction-Manual-RED.pdf

Good luck with it - it didn't help me much.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Change gear alternative material
21/09/2020 07:28:46

Hi Paul,

I made a set of change gears for my Boxford AUD lathe using Delrin. It works a treat and is easy to cut. I cut them from a 10mm thick sheet rather than having to get a selection of round stock. Luckily the tumbler gears were stamped 20 P.A. so I didn't have to guess the pressure angle. You can get a full set of gear cutters from the Chinese site which dares not speak it's name on this forum for $100 or so.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Motorising the feed screw
16/08/2020 07:29:37

Hi,

I'd like to do the same. I have a couple of stepper motors but I can't figure out how to control their speeds using a potentiometer. I'm sure it's a trivial matter using an arduino to someone who understands these things, so trivial in fact that I can't find anywhere on the interweb which explains completely how to do it.

Deleted see Code of Conduct.

It looks like what I'm after but I'm not sure what else is required. Can anyone help, or give an idiots guide on how to achieve it with an Arduino. Don't worry about insulting me by stating the obvious, you can't underestimate how rubbish I am at getting anything useful out of an Arduino.

Regards,

Alan

Edited By JasonB on 16/08/2020 07:31:47

Thread: Triumph motorcycle auction
09/08/2020 07:13:03

Hi,

For the last 5-10 years I have been puzzled as to why manufacturing jobs are being lost to low wage economies. With the advent of CNC machines, I would have thought that the cost of capital rather than the cost of labour would be the determining factor as to where articles are manufactured.

I could envisage a factory making lathes for example which employed CNC machinery for machining the components and automated systems for supplying raw materials and moving the finished components around, assembling them into the final products, packing and despatching them with no human workers in sight.

The cost of a product coming out of a factory like this would be dependent on the capital required to set it up rather than the cost of labour to run it.

I don't know about the UK, but the USA is known for its ability to raise capital for manufacturing enterprises, so why are (I nearly said jobs but with an automated factory there's not many of those anyway) the factories moving to Asia?

Any economists out there who can enlighten me?

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Melting bronze
03/08/2020 07:08:13

Hi,

I used to work in a factory which had a glass furnace. The flow rate of the glass was checked by running it into a steel container over a timed interval and weighing it. A sheet of newspaper was placed in the container first, and it burnt out leaving a layer of carbon between the molten glass and the steel which stopped the glass sticking to it.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Measuring Gears (including pressure angle)
22/06/2020 07:36:31

Thanks Andy. It's good to have all this info in one place. I've printed it out for reference. I've always been stumped when it comes to determining the pressure angle. I'm not sure how to measure the span across the flanks. Are the tips of the caliper presented to the circumference of the gear, which will measure the span fairly high up the tooth, or to the side of the gear where the span can be measured fairly close to the root?

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Problems bending 3/16" dia copper pipe without kinking
14/06/2020 06:59:14

Hi,

I've had success bending 1/8" copper tube by inserting a length of nylon strimmer line into the tube before bending. 1.65mm line is a snug fit. The line is removed after bending the tube using a metal plate with a 2mm hole drilled in it. The line is threaded through the hole and the end of the tube butts up against the plate. The line is grasped with a pair of pliers and levered out by pivoting the pliers against the plate. I can get tight bends with no kinking.

It's important that the line is removed after each bend is made as the resistance to being pulled out increases with each bend until it snaps off instead of coming out. Then you are up for heating the tube and applying compressed air until molten plastic is squirted across the workshop.

I'm not sure strimmer line is available in the diameter needed for 3/16" tube, but if it is, it might be worth a go.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Spot Facing With Slot Drill?
18/05/2020 07:19:23

Hi Ron,

I'm not clear as to how you milled the teeth. From your picture, I can see that the bottom of the cutter is in the same plane as the angled part of the tooth but the side of the cutter doesn't line up with the part of the tooth which is parallel to the drill. If the teeth were cut as shown, wouldn't you end up with a negative rake? Did you file the side of the tooth after milling to give a neutral rake?

Regards,

Alan

Sorry Ron, I've looked at your post again and I see you say you filed the cutter after hardening to sort the rake out. I initially thought you meant you had filed the top of the teeth to provide clearance after milling the top of the teeth to ensure they were all the same height.

Alan

Edited By Alan Charleston on 18/05/2020 07:30:11

Thread: Insulating board that won't drop powder as it is touched
30/03/2020 06:44:54

Hi,

I would agree with Dick that painting it with a solution of water glass (sodium silicate) would fix the problem. Years ago I made a small oven for use in a lab and it was insulated with a putty of powdered asbestos and sodium silicate solution. It was plastered on and dried by turning the oven on. The surface was stable and I used it for years.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Copper pipe Diameter Reduction
30/03/2020 06:37:00

pipeswage.jpgHi,

I made a tool which bells out the ID of 1/2" copper pipe to the OD so two pieces can be brazed together. The small diameter is 1/2" followed by a slow taper till the OD is reached then a parallel length at the OD. The pipe is grasped in the left hand and the 1/2" section is inserted. The tool is then whacked with a big hammer until the desired result is achieved. It probably wouldn't hurt to anneal the copper first, although I haven't had any pipes crack.

Obviously the dimensions would be changed to suit your pipes.

Thread: Blueing (blacking) steel
15/02/2020 05:21:20

Hi,

After a bit of thought I'm sorry I posted this. Even preparing the solution can be hazardous. Adding a kilo of caustic soda to a litre of water will result in a boiling solution which is extremely corrosive to skin, eyes and lungs if the vapour is inhaled.

"Not done it yet" is quite right about the PPE required. The gloves should be heavy duty gauntlet type and a full face visor is essential. No bare skin should be exposed. Both making up the solution and immersing the articles to be blued in the boiling solution should be done outside - not in the kitchen.

Probably best if the moderator deleted my post but I can't find out how to contact him.

Alan

14/02/2020 07:28:44

Hi,

In the past there have been various threads about blueing or blacking steel, with people wanting recipes for doing it. Here is one I came across on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uh473KIgqjo

The recipe is as follows:

" The recipe i used to make my gun black was:

This method is called hot bluing steel. First you have to boil water with washing soda and put all the parts in it to degrease the gun. Secondly take 1 kg POTASSIUM NITRATE (KNO3) and 1kg CAUSTIC SODA (NaOH) then mix both of them into 1 litter water and boil it. But make sure of your safety first. This is a highly exothermic reaction. So add ingredients slowly and mix them. Put all parts in the recipe then let it boil till you get your desired blue-black color. Apply oil to the parts. "

He shows the process about 8 minutes into the video.

I'm not sure how easy it would be to source potassium nitrate these days ( I got 500g from the local chemist when I was a kid 50 years ago after swearing I wasn't going to make gunpowder - yeah right) and of course be careful when adding the caustic soda to the water (gloves and glasses.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Delays in Shipping from China
07/02/2020 05:46:37

Hi,

I ordered some carbide milling cutters from China through AliExpress on the 16th January and I see that they haven't been shipped yet. Normally this happens within a few days of the order being placed. Given the situation in China I'm not complaining - I feel really sorry for them.

Have any others seen this? I don't know how businesses over there are run, but if western companies had to suddenly shut down for weeks at a time, there would be mass closures I imagine.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Where to acquire a small amount of bromine
07/02/2020 04:50:42

Hi Ian,

I used to use bromine in a lab. Mark and Dave are right about using and storing it in a fume hood - it's nasty stuff. Although the boiling point is 59C, it has an appreciable vapour pressure at room temperature and gives off brown fumes which are as toxic as chlorine which was the first poisonous gas used during the First World War and has been used in Syria. I would suggest that unless you've had more than just secondary school training in chemistry that you give it a miss.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: At last - no more chattering when parting off!
07/10/2019 08:11:25

Hi,

Came across this solution to chattering when parting off on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lboJ95ZlvV0

Go to 58:26

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Glass cutting
27/08/2019 07:04:51

Hi Ken,

I'm not sure using a cut down bottle is such a good idea. Bottles are usually made from soda lime glass which doesn't handle thermal shock well. The glass will get hot from the lamp flame and if a bit of water gets onto it it will likely shatter.

You would be better off getting in touch with a scientific glassblower who should be able to supply you with a length of borosilicate (pyrex) glass of the right diameter and with the ends flame polished to take away the sharp corners.

Mind you, I thought miners lamps had copper or brass gauze around them to prevent methane in the mine atmosphere from igniting.

Rehards,

Alan C.

Thread: Dehumidifier project
30/07/2019 07:02:00

Hi,

I assume you want to dehumidify the atmosphere around your machines to prevent condensation and corrosion. If that is the case all you need do is to raise the temperature a few degrees hotter than the surrounding air to keep the relative humidity less tan 100%.

I used to run a steam generator which was sometimes hard to start due to condensation in the electrical control gear. I fixed it by putting a heated towel rail on the ground underneath it. It didn't take much electricity to run, was designed to run continuously and stopped water from condensing on the generator.

Regards,

Alan

Thread: Guess the Chemical?
28/07/2019 06:53:20

Ethanol?

Alan

Thread: Threading Problems on Colchester Student
18/06/2019 10:02:29

Hi,

The idea isn't mine. I picked it up from this YouTube video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXt4TWa382Q

He shows how to do it very clearly. I've used it on a bunch of different threads and it's never failed.

I think the reason it works is that by engaging the half nut on the same thread dial number when reversing, it engages on the screw at the same point as when it disengaged going forward i.e. it's the same as not disengaging the nut but stopping and reversing the lathe.

Regards,

Alan

18/06/2019 07:22:06

Hi Stephen,

You don't need to keep the half nut engaged when cutting a metric thread on an imperial lathe if you have a thread dial fitted. The procedure to follow is:

After setting the tool to cut the correct depth, start the lathe in the forward direction and when the thread dial reads 1, engage the thread nut.

When the tool has advanced to the end of the thread, disengage the half nut and turn the motor off.

Withdraw the tool to clear the work.

Start the lathe in reverse and when the thread dial reads 1 engage the half nut.

Run the lathe in reverse until the tool clears the work.

Turn the lathe off but leave the half nut engaged.

Set the tool to the new depth and start the lathe in the forward direction.

Repeat till the thread is cut to size.

This method is useful because disengaging the half nut stops the tool a lot quicker than waiting for the lathe to run down giving a more accurate stopping point.

I don't know if it makes much difference, but the half nut on my lathe also has a bit of play in it and I always grasp the apron handle when starting a cut to apply a bit of force resisting the movement of the saddle and making sure any backlash is taken out of the half nut - don't get too enthusiastic though, a gentle pressure is what I aim for.

Regards,

Alan

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