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Member postings for not done it yet

Here is a list of all the postings not done it yet has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Question from a customer
06/10/2019 14:37:04

The answer of 14.7psi or 1 Bar is correct and can be ‘verified’ by checking any ‘vacuum gauge - they don’t make them with dials greater than that!

The only way to increase the pressure beyond one atmosphere on the surface is to place the vessel in a pressurised container or sink it in a fluid. Think here of submarines - they have a maximum dive depth after which they are simply crushed by the outside pressure.

Thread: DIY glass fibre pulley?
06/10/2019 11:39:44

Weak link? I would fit shear pins for that purpose. Slipping belts is poor engineering or necessary to cover up previous poor engineering.smiley

Thread: Has to be seen to be believed
06/10/2019 09:59:43

Is there the possibility the vendor is a forum member? Or maybe a forum reader has whispered in his ear?

Thread: Wanted: Shaper
06/10/2019 09:49:08

There is a ‘wanted’ section on the forum. Just scroll down on the right side.

Thread: DIY glass fibre pulley?
06/10/2019 09:22:20

As Clive. 3 pieces of 1”, 4 of 3/4” or 5 of 5/8” as you are writing in inches. Any suitable combination of sizes would work, but the thicker the better I suppose...

TBH, I think I would be converting to a format, other than flat belting, if possible.

Thread: Pulley material
06/10/2019 09:06:44

Fit toothed belt and pulleys? No slippage (rubbing) problem. Cam belts last 50,000miles or more on cars.

Thread: Has to be seen to be believed
06/10/2019 08:56:24
Posted by fizzy on 06/10/2019 00:42:07:

And therin lies my unmentioned dilema. As a professional boiler maker I see how terrible this item is - If put under pressure it will simply distort and eventually fail - it wont explode, its not a bomb and it probably will fail at 15 psi....but its a terrible thing that is being passed off as well made. Do we have a duty of care to point this out or do we say nothing in the hope that nothing bad comes of it?

‘’but its a terrible thing that is being passed off as, well, made.”

That might be a better, more honest, way for him to put it! smiley Well, it was made, but now the description reads as not necessarily well made - which it obviously is not.

Here is what the internet dictionary says. One of them will fit. But basically a seller looking for a mug to buy some rubbish, IMO:

exclamation

exclamation: well

  1. used to express a range of emotions including surprise, anger, resignation, or relief.

    "Well, really! The manners of some people!"

    • used when pausing to consider one's next words, to mark the resumption or end of a conversation, etc.

      "well, I suppose I could fit you in at 3.45"

    • used to indicate that one is waiting for an answer or explanation from someone.

      "Well? You promised to tell me all about it"

05/10/2019 22:17:36

I reckon the vendor has missed out a much needed comma, or two, which could have made the fact that it was made rather more descriptive than the advert indicates. Possibly short on writing skills, but more likely mis-leading on purpose.wink

Thread: Metal expansion
04/10/2019 12:38:27

There are doubtless videos, showing the ‘ball and ring’ thermal expansion school experiments, on the net?

As SOD points out, shrink fitting of parts could not happen if the hole ‘shrunk’!

Invar, a metal alloy, has a nearly zero coefficient of expansion.

Thread: What are members thoughts on Gap Bed lathes ?
04/10/2019 11:14:01

The thread seems to be concentrating on gap beds (per the thread title). The poster was initially also expecting comparison between the chester gap bed lathe at £2.5k and the Warco 290V at £3.3k. No option of a non-variable speed Warco offering and not a gap bed lathe.

My thoughts are that the gap bed will be at a premium, so I would expect the quality/functionality of that lathe is less. That given, the gap bed lathe does appear to weigh in at about 150kg more (does the 230kg include the mass of the stand would be one enquiry). With different bed lengths, that increase is quite considerable - but they have chopped out 75mm extra at the gap end.

I would remember that most gap bed lathes were relatively old iron and very robust. Not so sure about chinese offerings at the ‘hobby’ end of the market.

Might be worth watching the Keith Fenner series of videos on his more recent gap bed lathe (rather larger than most hobby lathes, possibly?) rebuild.

Two different lathes by a long way, so not very comparable, I would have thought. Buyer’s choice entirely. If I were expecting £3.3k quality/functionality I would be checking out both lathes in the flesh, for sure, before making my decision. If not so concerned about the quality/otherwise functionality, and needed the extra swing, then the craftsman is the only option?

Thread: 3 jaw runout problems
03/10/2019 19:40:30
Posted by Richard Cox on 03/10/2019 18:09:58:
Posted by Hopper on 03/10/2019 00:05:12:

Maybe buy a new set of the removeable jaws and hope they too are not a Friday afternoon job?

Otherwise shim what you have with steel shim. Suggested feeler gauge is a good idea.Welding wire is too soft.

Hi hopper sounds like a good idea I hope it is the jaws and not the chuck sliders where would I get replacement jaws from it’s a Chinese chuck on a warco gh1440

I would be asking Warco, as the obvious starting point.

Thread: Leadscrew material ?
03/10/2019 19:32:06

I read this thread as a mis-named feed screw, not a lead screw. It is certainly ambiguous and with the word ‘cross’ included, to me, indicated he actually meant feed screw for the cross slide - not the lathe lead screw. Also, can someone please explain exactly how any feed nut, on its own, is “adjustable for wear”. As I see it backlash simply increases as wear takes place until unacceptable or the nut threads fail.  Half nuts should be adjustable, to a point, obviously.

I can clearly understand the need for a non-square thread for a lead screw, but not for a simple feed screw. Square is stronger than alternatives, cutters are simplicity to make (and it matters not a jot if slightly too narrow as the thread can be corrected by the odd division or two on the compound slide).

Edited By not done it yet on 03/10/2019 19:35:50

03/10/2019 19:32:05

I read this thread as a mis-named feed screw, not a lead screw. It is certainly ambiguous and with the word ‘cross’ included, to me, indicated he actually meant feed screw for the cross slide - not the lathe lead screw. Also, an someone explain exactly how any feed nut, on its own, is “adjustable for wear”. As I see it backlash simply increases as wear takes place until unacceptable or the nut threads fail.

I can clearly understand the need for a non-square thread for a lead screw, but not for a simple feed screw. Square is stronger than alternatives, cutters are simplicity to make (and it matters not a jot if slightly too narrow as the thread can be corrected by the odd division or two on the compound slide).

Thread: Closet Machinist
03/10/2019 19:17:54

Go to ‘Forums’ on black bar towards the top of the page, select ‘website FAQS’. First one.

Thread: Battery charger problem
03/10/2019 17:38:41

As a matter of note, CJ needs to ignore the bit that says 3.7V is fully charged as it is actually the typical fully charged state for longevity of the cell. 4.2V represents the maximum voltage they should be charged to. Capacity is increased between those two voltages, but life-span is decreased.

Thread: Hi from Cambridgeshire
02/10/2019 21:41:41

New? Secondhand? Depends on your mechanical knowledge if secondhand.

Thread: Leadscrew material ?
02/10/2019 09:14:05

Nowt to add to the material choice but I would make a feed screw as a square thread - particularly if a new nut was required at the same time. I see no advantage of a trapezoidal thread in this application. Both my Raglan lathe and mill were fitted with square threaded feed screws as OE.

So much easier to make a cutter to do the job.

Thread: Hammer/Drift
02/10/2019 09:00:58

I made a couple or three wedges when I used my old mill. One went to my brother, with a mag drill, and there is one (or maybe two) sitting in a box, un-used these days. I would hang one adjacent to each machine if I used them regularly. Much the same with a lead/copper faced mallet - one for each machine. I have three er32 collet spanners - one near each machine - but I still lose them occasionally. Must fix a neodymium magnet to hold each one in view ... sometime....

Thread: New lathe?
02/10/2019 08:38:32

It would be my choice of the two, any and every day of the week.smiley

Thread: nutcracker
02/10/2019 08:34:30
Posted by Sam Stones on 02/10/2019 01:32:36:

This was my version of a nutcracker which I designed and prototyped to be injection moulded in polyacetal. Several metal parts formed the mechanism.

12.jpg

11.jpg

I based the action on a typical mastic-gun mechanism. The (fly-back) release was spring-loaded using the same lever seen at the front of this picture.

....

Sam

That reminds me of the old “Crackerjack” design - only they used a ratchet bar that eventually failed (before I had the wherewithal to replicate it in better than die-cast form. Now called a ‘bar craft nut cracker by kitchencraft (but currently unavailable). The crackerjack performed superbly unless worn out or over-loaded. I would buy one if I saw a decentbone at a car boot, now that I could make spare parts. Quite a lot on epay.

The above design seems to largely replicate that design in most ways.

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