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Member postings for not done it yet

Here is a list of all the postings not done it yet has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: spindle bearings
15/06/2019 12:34:49

And use the bearing manufacturer’s advice on lubrication - not the machine supplier. The latter would likely be inferior and more expensive! (I did note the supplier was not Arc, before making that comment)

Thread: How to machine Acetal
15/06/2019 08:43:52

Probably the easiest material I have turned.

A sharp tool, I use HSS for this. Reasonably slow speed and watch out for heat - it can burst into flames apparently, except they are invisible!

I have never tried to cut that length in small diameter. It likely needs small cuts and a following steady as it will easily deform, particularly with heavy cuts and when warmed up. Definitely keep the pressure axially, not radially.

Thread: Super Mini Lathe belt problem
14/06/2019 23:19:58
Posted by Haggerleases on 14/06/2019 22:57:15:

Well done Warco for passing on a pile of crap for quick profit. They'll be gone soon, I guarantee it. You can see it coming.

I don’t like bang good, for a very good reason - they sell cheap stuff but have no customer service when the goods are really rubbish (which they often are?)

Why do you dislike Warco?

Thread: Mini Lathe footprint dimensions and will it slide
14/06/2019 06:38:07

I think you need to do your own measuring. Some lathes are sized such that they will accommodate the full length between centres when fitted, but some are not quite so generous and may not enable a true 12” length to be mounted.

Shelf? Worktop comes to mind as a more useful description for situating a lathe. A well supported ‘shelf’ might do, but hanging 40kg(?) away from the attachment point would need very strong fixings. The loadings may well considerably exceed the mass moment, especially if something jams suddenly.

I would suggest that the distance between the feet might be the better measurement for the actual length of the shelf (overhang would clearly need taking into account), but the mass would be supported by the feet and any extra shelf length would be taking up space at all times?

Thread: Illegal CD copy
14/06/2019 05:54:55

That’s alright Freddie,

We will all read MG’s comments and probably have a good laugh at the content - at your expense.

This thread started out about “illegal copying”. It is just that - not LAWFUL.

Comprendez? End of story, really. Your ilk may get away with it - until someone deems it worthwhile to take them to court for damages. Damages may well be sufficient to deter that individual, as further infringement would likely incur even heftier costs as a serial offender. Out of copyright is fair game to copy - it keeps the publication in circulation - as it is LAWFUL. Denying a legitimate author his/her legitimate dues and making a personal profit from that action is reprehensible. I don’t like thieves.

Thread: New Lathe addition to workshop
13/06/2019 15:50:15
Posted by JasonB on 13/06/2019 15:21:28:
Posted by not done it yet on 13/06/2019 14:42:10:

First price I saw was $4375 and, since, over $7300. Unusual for a chinese piece of kit?

You don't say what dollars but this one has them at $2500 AUD ( £1420GBP) which comes out rather well when compared to the Warco cost in GBP of £2000

I did, at least, check the OP was based in the US.wink

Thread: Electricity Supply
13/06/2019 15:45:27

Farmboy,

You have completely missed the point, once again.

Liquid petroleum burned as liquid fuel for transport is very inefficient, - I repeat that petrol engines are only a little over 25% efficient. Diesel are more like 30% efficient.

The same amount of electrical power as the energy content of the fuel is just not required! Electric vehicles are over 70% efficient (indeed, the Tesla electric motors were 93% efficient and the latest versions are 97% efficient. Compare 25% to 90% and you might understand that only one third of electrical energy is needed compared to energy input for internal combustion engined transport!

Burning oil to raise steam is only about 40% efficient as an electricity generating energy source (much the same as coal), but if utilised in the same manner as combined cycle gas powered plants the efficiency could rise to about 60%.

So your sums are totally flawed. Using all that oil efficiently, could provide twice the amount of electricity needed to replace the oil as liquid transport fuel. Instead of 69GW (your units seem to be all at sea - as power is not energy), assuming your poor use of units is still providing the correct numerical values, only about 20GW extra of electricity would be required. Current maximum generation of the grid is currently about 50GW (little leeway for any unplanned outages) and average grid usage about 35 GW.

Clearly, without extra generators, the extra power required (20GW could not be provided - and certainly not in winter. In twenty or thirty, or more, years time, it could be. But the simple point is that your sums are a completely worthless. Comparing gross heat energy with nett electricity requirement is FLAWED.

13/06/2019 15:45:26

Farmboy,

You have completely missed the point, once again.

Liquid petroleum burned as liquid fuel for transport is very inefficient, - I repeat that petrol engines are only a little over 25% efficient. Diesel are more like 30% efficient.

The same amount of electrical power as the energy content of the fuel is just not required! Electric vehicles are over 70% efficient (indeed, the Tesla electric motors were 93% efficient and the latest versions are 97% efficient. Compare 25% to 90% and you might understand that only one third of electrical energy is needed compared to energy input for internal combustion engined transport!

Burning oil to raise steam is only about 40% efficient as an electricity generating energy source (much the same as coal), but if utilised in the same manner as combined cycle gas powered plants the efficiency could rise to about 60%.

So your sums are totally flawed. Using all that oil efficiently, could provide twice the amount of electricity needed to replace the oil as liquid transport fuel. Instead of 69GW (your units seem to be all at sea - as power is not energy), assuming your poor use of units is still providing the correct numerical values, only about 20GW extra of electricity would be required. Current maximum generation of the grid is currently about 50GW (little leeway for any unplanned outages) and average grid usage about 35 GW.

Clearly, without extra generators, the extra power required (20GW could not be provided - and certainly not in winter. In twenty or thirty, or more, years time, it could be. But the simple point is that your sums are a completely worthless. Comparing gross heat energy with nett electricity requirement is FLAWED.

Thread: New Lathe addition to workshop
13/06/2019 14:42:10
Posted by JasonB on 13/06/2019 10:37:54:
Posted by not done it yet on 13/06/2019 09:16:08:

Is it US or chinese manufacture?

A bit of research before asking would have shown that Weiss are based in Chinasmile p They will paint it whatever colour the supplier wants and put the stickers with their name on too.

Yes should do the job, my slightly larger 11 x 27 came from the same source.

Not my thread to go searching. cheeky I did ‘goggle’ it very quickly and was surprised at the price tag, unless there was something special about it, if it was chinesium.

First price I saw was $4375 and, since, over $7300. Unusual for a chinese piece of kit?

13/06/2019 09:16:08

Is it US or chinese manufacture?

Thread: Lubrication for open geared Metal Lathes
13/06/2019 08:45:56

I use oil. Anything that might come through the spindle will not stick to the gears. There are no belts in that area of my lathe. I don’t want to lubricate with anything that swarf can stick to.

Further, the shafts, on which those gears run need regular lubrication. Those on my lathe have oil holes through the gear bosses for that purpose. Grease would soon block those lubrication points.

Lubrication needs do not have a single universal fix. Some thought needs to be applied to make best use of the resource. Modern motorcycle chain lubricant would likely suffice for those that decide to use such a plan. There are a multitude of options - and aerosols are probably not the cheapest way to achieve good lubrication anyway.

Just my 2p worth.

Thread: Electricity Supply
13/06/2019 08:27:39
Posted by Samsaranda on 12/06/2019 22:17:21:

NDIY, you say houses are poorly insulated and better building techniques will be needed, there are currently a series of quality problems with houses that are being built by some of this countries major house builders, they need to seriously up their game to build houses that are compliant to current standards, are we going to have to rely on market forces to ensure future houses meet improved standards. I fear that the profit greed will mean we will always get houses basically not fit for purpose, I am glad my house is now nearly 60 years old and wearing well for its age and thankfully I have gas heating which works for me.

Dave W

Mine is 45 years old. It was built with open cavity walls - normal for that time. There was just 25mm of insulation in the roof. The floor was simply screed over an in-filled concrete base. Single glazed windows and doors with no draught proofing.

I have since had cavity wall insulation inserted, added about 350-400mm of loft insulation, fitted double glazed windows with draught-proof strips and virtually done away with the flue in the lounge. Can’t do a lot about the floor, but it will lose less heat to the soil than a ventilated timber floor. Even the patio door (fitted about the same time as the windows) has secondary double glazing for when not in use, as does the large window in the lounge. The back door is no longer used, so has been sealed with secondary glazing. The original back boiler in the lounge has been replaced by a balanced flue boiler in what is now the utility room (after an extention was built on).

So houses were not built to decent insulation standards, even 45 years ago. Older houses were likely worse. I know that these improvements have saved far more in fuel bills than the cost of the insulation. Just plain common sense to upgrade the soft-wood single glazed windows - to save umpteen coats of paint and still they would rot away

If all the lights of the original house were switched on they consumed about a kilowatt. Those same number of lights are now flourescents or LEDs. They would consume around 200W now.

Yes, we have gas central heating, but that will change in the future (likely long after I have expired) because the resource will have diminished to the point where the cost would be very high, compared to the last 50 years (when our North Sea supplies have basically been squandered). Norway will likely still have its gas reserves because they have refrained from using them up in the way the UK has used ours. It was simply a short term fix for the UK, back in the 1960s. Now almost gone!

Personally, I would not want to buy a new house from the major house builders, these days. Like most things - built to a cost, not a quality. My house would further benefit from 50mm of insulation on the inside of every external wall, but I doubt it will get it while I am here. But one never knows....

Thread: Rover V8 drilling valve guides
12/06/2019 22:30:59
Posted by Paul Kemp on 12/06/2019 21:18:43:

I would assume it's to preserve the fit. Every time you press something out the hole gets a teeny bit bigger. Drilling them out first reduces the bulk of material and relaxes the strength of the fit hence reducing the growth of the hole and preserving the original tolerance.

Paul.

And the replacements? One method is to bore and fit bushes inside the existing, another is to fit waisted guides (if fitted from the outside). Yet another is to knurl the guides or fit over-sized ones. I expect a loctite product would help retain guides (until the head is overheated).

Warming an aluminium head, with iron guides, will make the job a lot easier of course.

I’ve only ever replaced guides in cast iron heads, but never had a problem with pressing, or even thumping them out and in. We used to be able to ream the worn guides and fit new valves with oversized stems back in the 1970s!

Thread: High performance Torx bits
12/06/2019 22:16:09

Years ago (~30), I persuaded one firm to change from cheap (and nasty) screws to Reisser. Used 1000s without any problem (compared to the soft posidrive screws in use previously. The extra cost exceeded the aggravation caused by the cheap screws.

Reisser posidrive screwdriver bits proved equally successful.

I would expect the same for their torx options of the current day. But anyway, going to a proper tool and fixings supplier should get you the advice required.

The last posidrive #3 tips have come from Highland Industrial Supplies or from my local bolt and nut supplier (Sterling Bolt and Nut Co). Yes, more expensive than a pack of rubbish tips but so much better in the long run. I no longer use many of any, at my age, but I believe quality counts for more than cheapness, every time.

Thread: Electricity Supply
12/06/2019 21:41:59

Regarding heating of domestic properties - there are already heat pumps which can provide more space heating than the gas used to generate the electricity used by the pump. (Use the gas to produce electricity and then use the electricity to run a heat pump with an advantageous COP (Coefficient Of Performance)). Clearly the electrical supply will need to be reinforced for the change. But remember that natural gas is a finite resource. North Sea gas has mostly been used up in the last 50 years. Something will have to change, sooner or later. No point in sticking one’s head in the sand and ignoring the reality of the situation.

Many houses are still poorly insulated. Many houses are heated throughout which, again, is unnecessary. Already high-rise buildings are built without a gas supply because of the explosion risk. Better house building techniques may well be needed. But things can not go on as they have done for the last 60 years - something must change.

A relative in Canada had a ground source heat pump heating system installed about 30 years ago (perhaps more). The house is a proverbial mansion. Ground-source is rather more expensive to install but should have a far better COP than air sourced heat pumps. Technology is improving all the time.

Thread: Rover V8 drilling valve guides
12/06/2019 20:46:58

Is it a factory instruction to drill them out? I would have thought simply pressed out and pressed in?

Thread: Illegal CD copy
12/06/2019 09:45:51

In reply to barnaby, I hate giving my money to thieves. It only encourages them to thieve even more. It’s very much akin to handling stolen goods.

I hate thieves who go around stealing and damaging peoples property and creating a mess and distress along the way. You lot, who are then selling on this stolen property are at the bottom of the heap too, along with those that break into other’s property.

Thread: How to price up and sell a super 7 lathe
12/06/2019 09:27:23
Posted by Steamer1915 on 12/06/2019 08:36:57:

That looks like a nice lathe there. The only thing to point out is that it doesn't have a power cross feed as you have implied.

Maybe, as a non-modeller/machinist, he only meant ‘cross’ as being from left to right?

Thread: Electricity Supply
12/06/2019 09:15:18
Posted by Anthony Knights on 12/06/2019 03:57:07:

I have an friend in the local pub who's job is connecting BIG cables to sub-stations, wind turbines etc. I guess he is going to be busy for the next 20 years.

He won’t be the only one doing it! smiley Lots of fossil fuel workers will be looking for alternative employment, for a start.

11/06/2019 23:05:16
Posted by Bob Brown 1 on 11/06/2019 22:53:45:
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 11/06/2019 22:42:04:

Be happy [at least if you live where the sun shines] : **LINK**

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/science-environment-48530488/the-solar-power-charged-electric-cars-making-money

MichaelG.

May work on a tiny island (12 x 6 miles) with very few roads but lets get real out side of a small island it isn't going work.

 

Why not?  Modellers take full size machines and scale them down, so why should this not work, scaled up, on a bigger island?

Not necessarily including the UK here as it is clearly at a different latitude, but no reason why is might not work to some extent?

Edited By not done it yet on 11/06/2019 23:08:40

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