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Member postings for vintage engineer

Here is a list of all the postings vintage engineer has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Hello, Alexander master toolmaker
21/02/2019 09:53:51

I have one too. I was told that the designer was a jew who fled Germany with the design during the war. I have a vertical and the over arm for horizontal milling and it can shift a lot of material in this mode. I also have a slotting head from a another copy of the Deckel. I am looking for a tilting table and a dividing head. I did manage to buy a complete set of fed gears from a chap in Rugely who made them in batches.

Thread: Another newbie question!
19/02/2019 09:46:22

You could use the steady to support the end of the bar.

Thread: How many threads please?
12/02/2019 20:07:12

The ideal is 1 1/2 times diameter

Thread: Copper Round Head Rivets
04/02/2019 10:34:20

**LINK**

Thread: Some big tools
24/01/2019 11:40:14

I know what you mean about CI dust! I used turn 72" dia mill rollers that where 100 yrs old!

Posted by Kettrinboy on 24/01/2019 11:18:52:

Heres the "big tool " I used to work , this is circa 1985 I was 22 yrs old and a couple of years out of my 4 yr apprenticeship and happily working in the turning section of a printing press maker in Kettering , then I was asked to train up on this beast because the bloke who worked on it was leaving , its a milling machine converted from a big planer , made by Futurmill a firm based in Brighouse Yorks , table size 12 ft by 5 ft and a 50hp motor , with the 8 inch facemill which you can see fitted a roughing cut on cast iron which is about the only material this machine ever did was full width of the facemill 1/4 inch depth at 30ft p/min feed , its max was 50 ft p/min , this machine did all the preliminary milling of the baseplates and sideplates for the presses , typical size of a baseplate was up to 6ft square and after the top and side surfaces had been milled (you can just see the side head behind me ), then a load of drilled and tapped holes ranging from M5 to M30 had to be done , when I first did an M5 hole I thought how can this massive thing do a tiny thread like this, but by using a sprung holder and getting used to using the fine controls on the pendant it became everyday stuff , sideplates were typically 4-6 ft long and 3-4 ft wide by 2-3 inches thick and the tolerance on all thicknesses was +/- 0.002" which it would pretty easily get to ,I worked on this machine for 6 yrs and I am glad I used facemasks from early on with it as the black CI dust produced was horrendous , every day you needed a new mask as a new mask put on in the morning would be black on the outside by knock off time, I don't know if its still working today as I left the firm in 1990 and havnt been back since so I p1010448.jpgmight have to have have a peek in the shop sometime as its only down the hill from my house.

regards Geoff

23/01/2019 19:45:23

Well I don't what those big machines are if they are not machine tools!angry

Posted by Neil Wyatt on 23/01/2019 19:27:25:
Posted by Brian H on 23/01/2019 17:07:44:

Shame that much of this has nothing to do with Big Tools!

Brian

In all honesty most of the vid in the orignal posting had little to do with machine tools.

Neil

Thread: The UK Space Program (Its not NASA, its NONO)
23/01/2019 15:19:57

Blame the politicians! They have always cocked anything that makes a profit!

Posted by Howard Lewis on 23/01/2019 15:12:42:

Sadly, the Brits seem to be good innovators, but for some reason lack the sense to develop and exploit the invention, and either give it away (Gas Turbines etc) or we allow industrial espionage to make us pay royalties for using our own inventions.

Maybe someone thinks that it makes economic sense, that way;. I don't, but am only an Engineer.

If Britain had been paid royalties on all the inventions that we have given to the world, WE would own Europe, not the other way round!

Howard

Thread: 1/2 bore slitting saw suppliers
23/01/2019 11:02:17

Use one with a bigger bore and make a stepped washer.

Thread: Crumbling Monkey Metal
21/01/2019 22:12:51

Thank you.wink

Posted by Tim Stevens on 21/01/2019 12:17:37:

If I can add to the 'embrittlement' idea:

This effect is known mainly on high tensile steel, and is caused when electroplating (such as zinc). When the steel is put under tension, hydrogen (from the effect of electrolysis) trapped under the plating percolates along the crystal boundaries of the steel, causing serious weakness. Just like a single drop of water can loosen the cohesion of a sugar lump.

If this effect happens in die-casting alloys in damp conditions, it may be because layers of different metals make tiny cells, generating small currents. This then creates the same sort of conditions as in steel. And the hydrogen comes from the water (even without electrolysis) as the metal - aluminium, zinc etc - reacts with moisture. This corrosion is called oxidation - the metal takes oxygen from water, and this leaves spare hydrogen ready to creep between the minute crystals.

The real problem is that neither the makers of model cars, nor those who made carburettors, or dashboard knobs, had any idea that their products would be treasured one hundred years later.

The same sorts of effects will destroy our favourite plastics, soon enough, don't you worry.

Cheers, Tim

21/01/2019 08:57:46

Dixie Magnetos from America are notorious for failing due to hydrogen embrittlement. Because there is electricity passing through the body when the engine is running, any moisture gets gets split into oxygen and hydrogen. Most non critical aluminium castings on vintage cars contain large quantities of zinc. SU carbs are so bad you can only weld them with zinc based filler rods.

20/01/2019 23:09:45

It's in the atmosphere trapped in H2O

Posted by Neil Wyatt on 20/01/2019 15:48:37:
Posted by vintage engineer on 20/01/2019 15:00:41:

It's caused by hydrogen embrittlement. A naughty trick foundries do on aluminium castings is to add zinc to bulk out the aluminium. This comes to light when you try to weld the crap!

But where does the hydrogen come from?

20/01/2019 15:00:41

It's caused by hydrogen embrittlement. A naughty trick foundries do on aluminium castings is to add zinc to bulk out the aluminium. This comes to light when you try to weld the crap!

Thread: Some big tools
16/01/2019 19:24:24

**LINK**

Thread: Free Electricity
16/01/2019 16:32:18

There was a rumour that someone in America built a huge coil under a powerline to create inducted electricity. Don't know if it would work?

Thread: lathe to cut 26tpi
15/01/2019 19:33:18

£8900 + vat for a new Boxford and they put cheap crappy hand wheels on the machine!

. As buying secondhand is always risky you might buy a new Boxford.

Thread: Hole cutter
12/01/2019 20:41:22

I would drill a hole down one side and use a bandsaw to cut out a 3" billet then bore the rest out.

Thread: More help please
10/01/2019 10:22:56

It can only be your gearing is out or something is moving in relation to your gearing.

Thread: Measurements from the past
01/01/2019 10:47:16

I have seen references to 1/128"

Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 01/01/2019 10:44:45:

Thou=0.001" was introduced into engineering despite stiff resistance from the old guard. Chaps trained to work in fractions saw no reason to adopt new-fangled innovations. To them working beyond 1/64" was an unnecessary threat to their livelihoods and an attack on their self-worth. Old ways are always the best ways...

31/12/2018 23:04:08

I worked for an engineering company and one of the inspectors was German. We asked him how many thou's were in an inch and his reply was there must be hundreds!

Thread: Welding wrought iron
30/12/2018 10:04:05

The problem is the make up, is a semi laminar construction with all sorts of crap between the layers.

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