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Member postings for David Standing 1

Here is a list of all the postings David Standing 1 has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: THIN cutting oil - Suds alternative?
12/09/2019 15:16:53

Michael

That was one of the ones I looked at. As you will know probably better than me, product sheets often raise more questions than they answer! blush

12/09/2019 14:01:10

Michael

I too, out of curiosity, searched for product sheets before posting my first post, but none I found adequately explained what ISO grade the lubricant oil component was.

12/09/2019 12:26:31
Posted by Tony Pratt 1 on 12/09/2019 11:58:35:

You can obviously use any oil as a cutting fluid but Neatcut et al are meant to be specially formulated for specific purposes, bit like putting cheapo oil from Wilko in your high performance racing spec car, it will run but for how long?

Tony

There are, of course, many different grades of hydraulic oil (including those used in aircraft control systems), but I suspect that a good grade hydraulic oil is probably a better spec that your average neatcut oil, not the other way round!

12/09/2019 11:28:10
Posted by Tony Pratt 1 on 12/09/2019 10:59:45:

I also use 'Neatcut' (Google it).

I have a suspicion that Neatcut labelled up by various suppliers is nothing but ISO 32 hydraulic oil.

One would hope not!

Tony

Why not? ISO 32 hydraulic oil is actually a good cheap general cutting lubricant for steel.

12/09/2019 10:49:11
Posted by Lainchy on 12/09/2019 09:39:56:

I've searched the forums, and found solid answer, each preferring their own solution. I guess I'm looking for a neat, thin, coolant that doesn't cause any of the fore mentioned pitfalls.

I know WD40 isn't a lubricant, but what about GT85? That IS supposed to be a lubricant. Is there a product that anyone recommends that can be used as a coolant / cutting spray that can assist drilling (since that's what we used it for on the course)

Ta

 

On steel, for turning/milling, I often cut it dry. Depends on circumstances.

If I feel I need to use a lubricant I am currently using Ambersil Tufcut, just because I have a bottle sitting around.

I also use 'Neatcut' (Google it).

I have a suspicion that Neatcut labelled up by various suppliers is nothing but ISO 32 hydraulic oil.

I have a very low general opinion of today's formulation of WD40.  Jack of all trades, master of none.  The lubricant content is a mere 5%.

It is, however useful as a lubricant for aluminium (as is paraffin, which is much cheaper).

I have GT85, but I use that as a mountain bike lubricant!

Basically, the more well known branded product, the more you will pay for it, and you don't need to.

 

 

Edited By David Standing 1 on 12/09/2019 10:53:00

Thread: Any one used a digital microscope for micro turning on a lathe
07/09/2019 23:38:26

Oh dear. Good luck wherever your travels may take you next smiley

Thread: Why does the micrometer have a second knurled segment
07/09/2019 20:03:09
Posted by Meunier on 07/09/2019 19:40:08:
Posted by David Standing 1 on 07/09/2019 11:20:19:
Posted by Daniel on 06/09/2019 21:11:05:

I don't think so, David

Thanks Daniel, but I was rather hoping the OP would answer the question smiley

DS1, based on his cryptic comment previously, perhaps the OP may no longer see your question(s) ?
DaveD

Dave

Possibly, who knows?! - the OP has never responded to any of my posts directly, when I was trying to help.

If you are suggesting he may have blocked me, fine, his choice, I don't have a problem with that yes

07/09/2019 11:20:19
Posted by Daniel on 06/09/2019 21:11:05:

I don't think so, David

Thanks Daniel, but I was rather hoping the OP would answer the question smiley

06/09/2019 15:15:55
Posted by Chris TickTock on 06/09/2019 10:32:32

Just look at the responses to this post the humour is perfectly acceptable but other comments not so. Frankly I see no escuse for rudeness but online forums seem to give cover to the coward who uses rudesness from a distance and huddles together with those of similar disposition. Most here are fine those that spoil for a fight don't bother answering my posts...it really won't bother me.

Chris

I'm not sure if this was pointed at me or not?

05/09/2019 17:39:07
Posted by MadMike on 05/09/2019 14:42:44:

Not wishing to be controversial, but is this a serious question?

I have suggested useful reading material to Chris on more than one occasion, he has not responded.

Book 6 in the Workshop Practice series, Measuring and Marking Materials, by Ivan Law, would answer this question too.

The preferred option appears to be to bombard the forum with questions instead.

Thread: Help choosing a Chinese lathe please
01/09/2019 09:30:27

Have you done a search?

This question is asked about twice a week........smiley

Thread: Myford 254 Apron
28/08/2019 18:44:54

Where are you located Chris?

Thread: Thread Gauges
28/08/2019 18:42:10

I can only suggest, once again, you buy the five 'Workshop Practice' books I listed in your 'materials' thread.

Harold Hall's Metalworker's Data Book, no. 42 in the series, contains a huge amount of info on threads, and more.

The books are as cheap as chips on eBay, and worth their weight in gold.

I have two copies of no. 42, a dirty working copy in the workshop, and a clean reference copy in the man cave indoors.

Thread: Myford 254 Apron
28/08/2019 18:31:34

Chris

Do you have the 254 manual?

Silly comment, but if either the cross feed lever (10) is raised, or the leadscrew feed lever (9) lowered, either will lock the apron/saddle from longitudinal movement.

Is the saddle clamp screw (15) slackened off?

Also, do you need to slacken off the gib strip at the rear of the saddle (1)?

Thread: Just for fun what’s this stuck in my tyre?
28/08/2019 16:15:54
Posted by Carl on 28/08/2019 14:18:52:

Looks like a bit of flint, maybe a Belemnite (bullet shape) fossil. Been to the beach ?

You didn't read Ian's post at 09:23:55 then? wink

Thread: 0.300" & 0.400" 28TPI Tap
28/08/2019 10:41:07
Posted by JasonB on 28/08/2019 10:03:17:
Posted by David Standing 1 on 28/08/2019 09:48:49:

As you correctly stated earlier, BSCY is also a constant pitch thread at 26 tpi,

Only when it gets to 1/4" and larger, smaller diameters use 32 & 40tpi

Jason

You are right, and I should know that, having old British bikes and rebuilding them!

Thread: Just for fun what’s this stuck in my tyre?
28/08/2019 10:30:57

Ian

Plenty down here too!

My guess it was wedged deliberately - their shape means it is unlikely one will flip up if driven over.

Did you park in a multi storey car park prior to discovering it?

28/08/2019 09:58:10

Ah, 'hippy crack', N2O - you have no doubt parked in a quiet corner of a public car park, where the sniffers gather.

I suspect some smart Alec deliberately wedged it under your tyre at an angle, so it did what it did and penetrated the tyre.

Thread: 0.300" & 0.400" 28TPI Tap
28/08/2019 09:48:49

Richard

The constant pitch threads are just a subset within Unified, as are UNS, the specials. They aren't in common use, but a standard does exist for them.

As you correctly stated earlier, BSCY is also a constant pitch thread at 26 tpi, as is BSB (Brass), which, although also 26 tpi, is confusingly NOT the same as BSCY!

I have a number of reference books I use for for threads - Machinery's Handbook, Kempe's, Newnes, IMechE, but my go to first choice for the most common threads is normally Harold Hall's Metalworker's Data Book, no. 42 in the Workshop Practice series.

Edited By David Standing 1 on 28/08/2019 09:51:57

28/08/2019 08:17:06
Posted by Richard Hooper on 28/08/2019 07:48:14:

Thank you for the prompt replies. Never heard of 28-UN who knew........ Think that one will be in the "come in handy" section of the tap drawer, never to see the light of day again.

Thanks again.

Rich.

You probably have heard of UN threads.

UN stands for Unified, and is is the standard US thread standard.

Within that you have UNF (unified fine)

UNC (unified coarse)

UNEF (unified extra fine)

UNS (unified special - custom/non standard UN threads drop into this category)

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