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Member postings for David Standing 1

Here is a list of all the postings David Standing 1 has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Boxford X10 user manual pdf
21/04/2019 11:12:20

Douglas

If you didn't know, you might like to note this thread:

**LINK**

Thread: Lathe controls position
17/04/2019 17:53:46

My recently acquired Student has the start/stop/forward/reverse switch located on the saddle (the big red knob in the photo, stop in centre, up for reverse, down for forward)).

Very safe and very handy!

dsc_4630.jpg

Thread: Poor finish using indexable lathe tools on steel
15/04/2019 21:17:49

Reduce your tool overhang too, if you can.

 

 

 

Edited By David Standing 1 on 15/04/2019 21:18:08

Thread: How to get that high end paint finish
13/04/2019 13:52:55
Posted by Rainbows on 13/04/2019 12:44:06:

My current brush is a Synthetic Harris Trade Fine Tip 2" or 2 1/4". Its the second cheapest screwfix sold (I thought avoiding the truly cheapest might give me an edge). I was thinking that some bristles on a stick are some bristles on a stick no matter how cheap. Will have a look around for the more expensive brushes.

Think my sandpaper was 320 grit, was sanding dry but with all the paint immediately clogging my paper I was considering using water to see if that helped, will do so in the future.

I do not like synthetic brushes, they flick paint, and do not flow as well as real bristle.

Also, if your paper is immediately clogging with paint, the paint is too soft/hasn't fully gone off.

When you say sandpaper, do you really mean sandpaper? Sandpaper will fall apart if wet, only wet and dry will work wet.

I spent years working in bodyshops, so do have a bit of background in paint prep and finishing.

13/04/2019 13:48:19
Posted by Rainbows on 13/04/2019 10:15:19:

I looked at my mini lathe and they have done a pretty good job of getting a perfectly flat finish with some no doubt cheap labour. Can anyone see the part of my process that is giving me such uneven fninishes?

Remember if making a comparison that you are brush painting, and the manufacturers spray paint.

Thread: Milling curves
09/04/2019 10:09:17
Posted by Roy Garden on 21/03/2019 23:38:16:

Gents, I'm profoundly grateful for the advice, thank you all.
Through some budding bodgineering (which is what I aspire to) and using hints and tips from this thread, I've kind of got close to what I was after.

The "nail it to the table, and spin it round" advice kind of covers most of the equipment I currently have.
The "File it, it's faster and easier" Well, I have a car, driving to get a bacon buttie is fast and easy, flying there is a pain in the butt, slow, unreliable, fraught with wasted effort, but good fun ! (99 times out of 100, I'll take the easy option, but when it's new . . I'll go with the wasted effort just for the experience)
Can I file? Yes.
Do I want to file? No, that's why I bought a belt sander.
(Tho, having said that, I've never heard of using bearings whilst filing, Can I get a link for how that works? )


I went with the "Pin through a hole and rotate in the vice" method, Sadly, a long (ish) piece of work and a low vice meant I managed very little of the curve that way, but enough to get a "feel" for the shape, 5 minutes on the belt sander and, from a distance, with yer glasses off, in low light, it kind of, looks ok.

Probably 4 hours time playing with the mill today, I think the finish looks good (it's what I wanted to see)
I'm discovering that "machining" is probably best done by fairly accurate sawing, finished off by machining the bits the saw can't do and providing a surface texture.
An hour spent cleaning (that's new to me too, I'm sure I'll get faster) and the garage has a shiny, uncompleted "bit" in it, a clean shiny mill, and a happy bunny who is now waiting for more "essential tools" to arrive.
In the meantime, I can pick the swarf out of my socks . . .
(and try to hide the battery Dyson from the wife, it looks a bit sad for having eaten lots of aluminium swarf and WD40)

Thanks again, I shall be asking more questions as I blunder along the learning curve.

Edited By Roy Garden on 21/03/2019 23:42:20

Edited to remove oil rig language.

Edited By JasonB on 22/03/2019 10:03:55

I like your humour smile

Thread: Unusual drills
30/03/2019 18:53:39

A photograph would help smiley

Thread: Myford 254s accessories ?
26/03/2019 15:53:09
Posted by Karl Roberts on 24/03/2019 11:38:26:

Hi I’ve just purchased a myford 254s but I’m having massive problems trying to source a 3 point steady specific to the 254 which I need to need one important job required in my job, the lathe is in under condition pretty much so good condition the steady must be if possible

also I have sourced a genuine taper turning attachment specific to the 254 from Myford direct to Aid me in making customised cylindrical grinding centres but at over £500 I just can’t justify it so if anyone has one for sale please let me know.

.....oh and just one more thing the lathe is imperial so is anyone aware of a conversion kit for metric screw cutting available to buy as I can only find patches of parts required to do the full job needed for the conversion any help greatly appreciated

Karl

254 accessories are as rare as hens teeth.

If you don't buy the taper turning attachment that is available, chances are it will be gone. Home & Workshop Machinery had one, that has gone.

Thread: What new lathe?
26/03/2019 14:37:18
Posted by Bill Phinn on 25/03/2019 22:15:01:

The Colchester looks wonderful, David.

My initial thought was "he's got that nice Boxford and a Myford already. Why does he need the Colchester as well?"

And then I realised it was just my jealousy talking, and I might do exactly the same as you if I had the chance/space/funds.

Which is still jealousy talking, but amicable jealousy at least.

Bill

If it helps, the Boxford has gone wink

Lathe wise I have the Colchester, Myford 254S and Myford Speed 10 now.

26/03/2019 14:35:37
Posted by Nigel McBurney 1 on 25/03/2019 17:24:29:

Nice lathe,especially as it has the long bed,which does allow the tailstock to be pushed back out of the way,We all all have space problems,but rear access to the coolant tank and motor is adviseable,my Colchester master 2500 is back against the wall so the lathe has to be moved to get access to motor and tank.lack of regular cleaning of the tank led to corrosion and leaking of the tank,modern coolants go off quicker and bacteria form which turns the coolant into corrosive liquid.My Master has a 5 HP motor running off a converter and I certainly do not end up with 5 hp so get a good converter with more than adequate power,Though I have no personal experience perhaps some form of digital conversion to 3 phase may even be better,and worth investigating,no point in having a really good lathe which is underpowered.

Nigel

There is space to get between the 254S and the Student to get to the coolant tank - albeit on hands and knees!

Thread: Boxford X10 lathes
26/03/2019 14:01:51

Hopper

I believe the previous report was that they were selling some of their production machinery (like surface grinders, probably used in the X10 production process), and the building was up for sale.

My take on it after talking to the Boxford spares staff is that they are selling the site - which if you look has masses of unused space - robably to raise funds for a smaller site.

It appears they are concentrating on CNC machines and 3D printers, so will probably buy in production from the far east, possibly made to their spec, so just be a box shifter and not need the existing space.

Rumours of the factory being 'closed down' are just that I believe. They were certainly there when I spoke to them eight days ago.

Thread: What new lathe?
25/03/2019 15:14:34

Steve

It's a matter of logistics.

Three lathes, three milling machines, two large benches, a Clarkson grinder, pedestal grinder, floor standing drill, floor standing polisher and various storage cabinets have to all share the same space!

The Student is that way round so I can get the change wheel door open, and pass material through the spindle.

It sits back to back with my Myford 254S as that is the most economical use of space.

Ideally I would have it flat to the wall, but there is already a tall tool cabinet, Myford 254S, and a Warco WM18 along the same wall!

Thread: Newbie with a chuck query
25/03/2019 15:03:51

Colin, you do have a set of mismatched jaws.

Pratt Burnerd are very much still in business, part of the 600 Group that owns, amongst other things, Colchester and Harrison.

If looking for a new set of PB supplied jaws, make sure you are sitting down first.

The 3 jaw 30M chucks might be made for Myford, but they do have a separate backplate, it is just they were supplied with the correct backplate for Myford.

It is more likely a jaw problem than a backplate problem.

It will probably be cheaper to get a good s/h chuck than buy a new set of genuine PB jaws from PB.

For starters, I would try and borrow a known accurate chuck from someone nearby and try that on your lathe, so you know the chuck is the problem.

 

 

Edited By David Standing 1 on 25/03/2019 15:05:16

Thread: What new lathe?
25/03/2019 11:23:43

Nope, not a what shall I buy thread, i've already bought it wink

I have had my eye on a Colchester Student 2500 for a while as an upgrade, and one came along in the right condition at the right price last week - so I grabbed it.

Deal done last Monday, installed in my workshop on Saturday.

330mm swing x 1,000mm between centres.

40mm spindle bore.

The current Student 2500 and Harrison M300 are identical, just a matter of the different stickers.

The previous owner bought it direct from the factory in 2013, and didn't use it.

I spent a chunk of Saturday cleaning the remainder of the protective coating off that it came out of the factory with, but apart from a little bit of swarf from test cuts, I can't find evidence it has ever been used, which was what I was told by the dealer I bought it off.

I need to upgrade my rotary converter (the 2500 has a 3 hp motor), it will then be time to make swarf!

dsc_4626.jpg

Thread: Boxford X10 lathes
25/03/2019 11:02:23

For anyone unaware, Boxford have ceased production of the X10 series lathes - 10.20, 10.30, 280, 330 etc.

Many of the accessories - some steadies etc are already obsolete.

Boxford are still stocking spares, but I suspect their days are numbered too.

If you want spares, I would buy them sooner rather than later.

End of an era, no manual lathes are now made by Boxford.

Thread: Myford 30M ?
21/03/2019 23:05:20

30M is just the chuck model number.

Thread: A Simple Protective Coating For Steel, Indoors
21/03/2019 23:02:20

Leave a space between the parentheses and the quote marks, or they create a wink emoji.

Thread: What is a good quality lathe paint
20/03/2019 11:46:10
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 20/03/2019 11:17:20:
Posted by Joseph Noci 1 on 19/03/2019 19:20:41:

Interesting that you folk recommend enamel paint - in our hemisphere, enamel paint is a generic name for the type of paint used in household applications - gloss and semi-gloss for doors, door frames, exterior facia boards, etc. This tends to be a turpentine solvent based paint and does certainly not stand up to machine lubrication oils and water soluble coolant, etc. Strictly utilitarian , white goods, and never on machines! So, your enamel must be something else..

...

'Enamel' is another of those words that's bent it's meaning over time and space. Originally 'enamel' was a baked on coating, heatproof, very hard and durable, applied to domestic ovens and cast-iron baths etc. Usually but not necessarily white. Expensive, can be done on a small scale, but really needs a largish kiln. Still found on posh cookware.

Later 'enamel' came to include 'hard wearing paints that look like real enamel', or, less desirably, 'any soft paint that looks a bit like real enamel'. Usually in the UK the hard wearing definition is what's meant, but what's available ranges between high-performance 2-part paints, and cheaper, less tough, mixtures. It is also possible to buy 'enamel' paints that aren't hard-wearing at all, making Grant's question a good one.

Dave

Dave, I would have to put my pedant hat on, and challenge you on that.

The first type you refer to has traditionally been referred to as stove enamelling. It still very much exists, and sits side by side with other (non baked) enamels.

Whilst I agree that the second is a catch all encompassing many types of 'enamel', it is still true that there is a separation, as there always has been, between baked stove enamel, and air drying (all the others).

You haven't even mentioned powder coating, which probably sits uncomfortably between the other two categories wink

20/03/2019 09:08:44
Posted by Peter F on 19/03/2019 23:49:36:

Joseph Noci, what Lathe is that in your photo?

Maximat V10-P

Thread: Help please, I have a Herbert
15/03/2019 18:26:22
Posted by Adam Harris on 15/03/2019 17:15:52:

Matthew I have private messaged you

It will be interesting to see if he replies, his last post was six years ago surprise

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