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Member postings for richardandtracy

Here is a list of all the postings richardandtracy has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: sealed glass window failure
23/05/2018 13:28:29

When I made a pair of double glazed sash windows from scratch, I used 3mm thick horticultural glass (which was double that of the 100yo glass that was in the windows that came out of the hole) and used two panes separated by 25mm beading. The outer pane was glued in with silicone on the inside & putty on the outside, and I just tacked beading around the inner pane. This allowed breathing of the space between & it never steamed up.

The first took me 3 weekend to make - starting with pallet timber - and the second with a small design change took just one weekend. 26 bits of wood in each, explains why sash windows went out of fashion.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: What's the best alternative to 'loctited'
22/05/2018 20:15:29

Why not go the whole hog and say it's been nailed together? devil

Regards

Richard.

22/05/2018 14:50:12

Yes, it certainly is.

Actually, it's 'As Required', but don't let on.

Regards,

Richard.

22/05/2018 14:27:35

'anaerobically locked'?

Not quite the pizzaz of 'loctited', but implies the same thing. The alternative is from the DO at work: 'Loctite 243 A/R', with '243' replaced by an appropriate number.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Controller for a 3 axis lathe
21/05/2018 17:54:20

Just as an update, after a fair bit of cogitating and dithering, I finally plumped for the 3 axis version of the 990TDc. Due to the size of the bite out of my budget, it's highly unlikely I can convert the machine this year. But I can learn how to programme it in the meantime, and maybe translate the manual from English I can't understand into English I can.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: New workshop building advice.
18/05/2018 10:40:23

Sorry forgot to mention my Victorian house has solid 9" thick brick where the problem arose. But the effect would have been the same had it been on the cavity part of the house (the front was built with a cavity to make it look fashionable).

In a more modern house with a physical dpc it may be worth taking the dpc fractionally above original house wall dpc level - or up to floor level if it's higher than the house dpc.

Regards,

Richard

18/05/2018 10:00:22

I have a Victorian house, no physical DPC, just a chemical one. So when we had a conservatory built, I insisted the dpc went up the wall to 4ft up. It was just as well, as the chemical DPC failed in a big way shortly after and the brand new conservatory plasterboard against the house wall would have needed re-skimming if I hadn't insisted.

It costs almost nothing, and won't be a problem to the builder if they are using studding for the internal finish. If they wanted to use dot & dab to stick plasterboard on, the dpc up the wall makes it impossible. That may be why he's resisting.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Carbide Insert decode
17/05/2018 13:54:40
Posted by Will Noble on 17/05/2018 08:22:55:

...Now there are dozens and dozens, some VERY cheap and probably VERY poor durability....

I have to confess I have not had poor durability from my ones, but I admit it is the luck of the draw whether you get an insert with the tool that's suitable for the job in hand. This thread: **LINK** showed the dramatic effect of correct & incorrect inserts in use in the same tool. In one case the face mill was unusable, and in the other it worked like a dream. You could be mistaken in putting the whole blame down to a poor tool, when it's just unsuitable inserts.

Part of the problem is that more choice gives the opportunity to make more bad choices, and it's up to us to learn enough to make good ones instead.

You wouldn't do to badly to look at MEW of the last couple of months where (for lathe tools) Neil went through the nomenclature of ones suitable for use on smaller machines. Failing that, look at the ArcEurotrade range that's up for sale. The Arc ones are probably all Chinese made, and look similar or identical to the ones available on E-bay, and none the worse for it. I am pretty convinced China is passing out of the 'make it - regardless of quality' phase and into the 'trying to increase quality and make durable items' phase. Same as Japan & S Korea did in the past. I think we're at the relatively short point where quality is good enough and price is still low that both Japan and S Korea showed 40 and 20 years ago respectively. Blink & you'll miss it...

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Controller for a 3 axis lathe
14/05/2018 15:53:18

Yes, I do need the threading. I want to make pens, and there are masses of odd threads I need to do: here is a list from the first set of pens I want to make:

  1. Cap Finial to Cap Body thread: M10 x 1, single start
  2. Cap to Barrel thread: M13.5 x 3, 4 start.
  3. Barrel to Section thread: M10.5 x 1, 2 start.
  4. Section to Nib unit thread: M7.4 x 0.5, single start

Depending on the levels of symmetry on the engraving on the outside of the pen, the Cap-Barrel thread may be 3 to 5 starts, but I am expecting the standard to be 4 starts. The form of the pens is as below:

All spirals will also have an opposite hand spiral variant.

The pens will all be in Fountain Pen, Rollerball and Ballpoint versions.

Having finally ruled out the milling controller option, I am looking at the Newkye/SZGH 990TDb/TDc **LINK** and the Tomatech TAC-1003T **LINK**. There doesn't seem to be anything between them on controller capability. Unfortunately the Adtech range does not have a 3 Axis lathe controller in the range.

Regards,

Richard.

14/05/2018 11:50:42

Martin,

I came to the conclusion I want to go for a semi-industrial self contained unit with screen, keypad et al in the same unit rather than have a board where I plug a laptop in to find out what's going on. Furthermore, I was so 'impressed' with their fulsome and wholehearted response to your problem (last year, or a bit before?) with the encoder I rapidly ruled out the PlanetCNC controller from my list of options.

Regards,

Richard

14/05/2018 09:06:21

Jason,

I have written a wrapper program to convert cambam milling output to go around an 'A' axis, such conversions are not a problem **LINK**. I have also got part way through a program that will use a reference profile to define the diameter of a piece of work so that non cyclindrical wrappings can be created. It's less easy than I had originally hoped - mostly because of the multiple ways a DXF file can define curves (splines, arcs etc).

I do find the lathe axis designations less intuitive than the mill ones. I always feel X should be along the lathe bed, Y the cross slide and Z the missing vertical axis. I can understand why the lathe designations occurred - trying not to re-write all the hard won code from milling controllers when they were pressed into use as the early lathe controllers - I just think it's less intuitive than it could be.

Murray,

I am looking for 3 axis lathe, not 2. That is the current cause of my wallet related pain. There is a 2 axis lathe controller for a little more than the milling controller I pointed to earlier, this is it: **LINK** If they did a 3 axis version at a little more I'd have been in heaven. They do not. Which is why my wallet is protesting at the £400 price hike to add a rotary axis. OK. I admit it, I am a serious skinflint try to make my money go as far as possible, and that price difference would keep the entire cnc lathe under £1000 as opposed to under £1500. Going to £1500 will probably mean I'll be able to afford the bits next year, but under £1k, I will be able to afford the bits this year.

I do agree that it looks as if it's going to be a PITA to use a milling controller on the lathe. But I think it is going to be the same if I use a lathe controller too, mostly down to my decision to use the motor the Clarke 430 comes with and not use a servomotor to drive the spindle. A 750W servo motor looks like it's coming in at £2-300 - again a big part of the cost of the lathe. I would prefer not to rule this option out as a future upgrade, which using a milling controller would pretty much do.

I am close to being convinced about not using a milling controller, doing the job closer to 'right' rather than quick.

Regards,

Richard.

13/05/2018 21:03:08

The first two PC's I used were Dell's. They failed fairly quickly, and I had a third that failed between me firing it up on arrival and needing to use it. Win some, loose some. The most expensive was £17.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: What did you do Today 2018
13/05/2018 20:54:19

I finished the attachment of my QC toolpost to the cross slide. It involved 2 bits of 6" x 3" x 1" steel blocks as a base and I made my first screw cut M14 x 1.5 mm thread to replace the supplied clamp bolt. Did it using hand power to the spindle and, with no half nut, a lot of winding of the spindle. The £6 thread cutting insert and holder worked perfectly, despite being chinesium.

Next job is making the female dovetail for the toolholder.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: Controller for a 3 axis lathe
13/05/2018 20:36:26

Thanks John. Not using Mach turn, but will be trying to get the similar result through a different means.

Regards

Richard.

12/05/2018 23:18:30

There are several small controllers that may work. The TC55 at about £130 is an option for a milling controller with a small screen built in. The Adtech is pricey, and both Newkye and Tomatech produce 3 axis lathe controllers at prices greater than the lathe - starting a £680 or so. These latter controllers have 7 or 8 inch screens built in.

Thus far I've seen no reason not to go for a milling controller, but my knowledge is less than complete.

Regards

Richard.

12/05/2018 23:06:11

Nick,

What bits of a lathe will it not support? As far as I can see, the following:

  1. Threading
  2. Lathe specific canned cycles in the G7x range.
  3. Spindle encoding - used for threading.

Is there more I have missed? The majority of a lathe's work can be simulated by 2 axis movement, which is well within the scope of a milling controller. There will be milling specific canned cycles that I'd have to avoid, but with thought it's not hard to imagine most lathe functions simulated as 2 axis mill functions. It should be relatively simple to work through a G1 command linking the spindle rotation axis (which I'll call 'A' and the lathe bed axis (usually called 'Z' with a command like 'G0 Z-20 A7200' to create 20mm of 1mm pitch thread - obviously having to repeat several times to get the correct depth of cut.

I have never used a CNC lathe, and am not totally sure of the full operation of one, or which codes are most useful, but I have studied the list G an M codes for each, and made a basic assessment of the possible viability of the idea.

I am looking for specific cases that I may need or have not considered. Sweeping statements and no specifics will not persuade me one way or the other.

John,

That was the sort of thing I was thinking of. Apart from being slightly crippled in its use, have I forgotten something obvious? I well know the thing hiding in plain sight is the bit you don't see..

Regards

Richard.

 

Edited By richardandtracy on 12/05/2018 23:10:15

12/05/2018 13:55:08

I am in the process of building a CNC lathe to make pens with. I want to be able to engrave the outside of the pen as well as make all the usual 2 axis lathe stuff.

Now, my workshop is unheated and is a killer forPC's, so I want to avoid the usual Mach3 route and use a standalone controller. WinXP PC's are getting less & less reliable as time passes and becoming less available to act as replacements, and I hate the faff of setting up a new PC every 6 months. There are quite a few milling controllers on the market, some of which are both cheap and capable. The problem is that 3 axis lathe controllers seem to be like hens teeth, a bit rare and disappear when you start looking harder for them.

A gent suggested I used a 4 axis milling controller instead. Used the x & y axes for the 2d bit of the lathe work, then remove the main drive belt and hook in a stepper motor onto the spindle for the thread cutting and engraving and then use X,Y and A. It sounds like it could work.

Has anyone tried a system like this? And can anyone see any drawbacks that I may have missed? I can write programs to generate code that would make up for the lack of a G76 thread cutting canned cycle, if that's the only drawback.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: Strength of Cast iron
11/05/2018 21:06:33

If it is really cast iron, as opposed to cast steel, then the strength will be very much less than expected.

At the turn of the 1800's to 1900's, the max tensile strength for cast iron was considered to be 2000 psi, and anything stronger was cast steel. In modern units, this is 13.8 N/mm^2. So, the shear strength is 65% of that at 9 N/mm^2. This goes a long way to explain why Victorian machinery was so huge for its output.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: 2 inch face mill problems
10/05/2018 19:55:42

In conclusion, then, it's highly probable that, if other causes have been eliminated and the finish from these Bang good style cutters is still inadequate, then different inserts should be investigated before condemning the cutter as rubbish. That is good to hear, but doesn't help those who've found the taper on the mandrel to be wrong.

What has surprised me,though, is their sensitivity to insert geometry. It is much more sensitive than lathe tools seem to be.

Regards

Richard.

08/05/2018 11:05:01

I have to confess I have no idea what inserts came with my cutter apart from the fact they were AMPT1604's. The insert box does not give any further indication (pot luck I got good ones, I think - it is typical of many of the Chinese inserts). Getting the right designation means it's possible to get the right ones again in the future - though not necessarily direct from China.

Regards,

Richard.

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