By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Member postings for richardandtracy

Here is a list of all the postings richardandtracy has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Help to select and lay concrete reinforcing mesh
07/08/2018 14:54:30

I cannot claim to be a structural engineer, but this is what I did when re-building a Victorian outhouse whose foundations had failed.

I used two sheets of the 6mm bar stuff (SRF001). these I trimmed to length with an angle grinder & cutting disc. I put them into the concrete after pouring and knowing the concrete would be in bending with tension on the top face, so I pressed the steel in less than 1/3 the concrete depth. Did not tie the steel together, but overlapped it by 4 holes in the mesh - about 2 ft. Edge distance, knowing the edges were likely to be wet, was 3". Less than that could lead to enough oxygen to be present for corrosion.

All in all the slab ended up thicker than expected because the truck had 2.5m^3 when we'd ordered 1.5, and was about 14" thick, so could have done without any steel. However, the old building had lasted 120 years on a 2" thick lime mortar foundation, so how long will this version last with a 14" steel re-inforced foundation? At least as long I hope.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Chain Hoist Tripod in MEW 264
07/08/2018 12:53:42

Where I work the commercial practice is to use a factor of 6 rather than 2 on lifting equipment, so using the calculations by Ian above would suggest a rated load of 4200/3 = 1400 kg, which is more in line with what my 'gut feel' of 1 Tonne would suggest. I believe in the US the figure is more normally 4 (a family story goes that my grandfather apparently accidentally sank a Liberty Ship in WW2 with a tank because of this difference in safety factors between the UK & US).

For webbing slings, CE marked stuff has a factor of 7 minimum, and I have come across 10 being required for some bits of kit being used in the US, though I've never been clear whether this is a regulatory or customer requirement.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Let's hear it for British manufacturing!
06/08/2018 23:15:28

Derek,

The Beaufort Bock offerings are adequate, but Onoto used to make their own and they were in a totally different league. Bock do supply some of the current good quality manufacturers, like Visconti, Delta and Stipula. Few manufacturers still make their own. Parker do, as do (IIRC) Montblanc and Pelikan. Modern Onoto nibs are, I think, made by JoWo, and every one is smoothed by John Sorowka before being sent out, making them about as good as you can get these days.

I have never been a real fan of Bock nibs, they don't have that little spark for me that the JoWo's have, and they don't seem to polish up so well either. A smooth nib is good, but there is a limit to how far they should be polished. I once over polished a Jinhao nib, and ended up with one that felt like it was always writing on ice, with no feedback at all. It was surprisingly disappointing and I ended up having to roughen it up a bit to make it feel better. Never been able to get to that stage with a Bock Nib.

The Bock titanium flex nibs are an attempt to reproduce the verve of the old gold flex nibs, unfortunately the attempt is not successful and falls woefully short of the old Onoto nibs.

Regards

Richard

06/08/2018 20:32:35

Parker fountain pens when made at Newhaven. Gorgeous, juicy nibs on interesting pens. Then the quite remarkable Duofold Centennial, a pen both looking back to a great past and taking advantage of the best of modern manufacturing. The Parker 61 in spectacular finishes with the 'Cumulus', 'Stratus' and 'Cirrus' designs.

Cannot forget, either, the amazing 'Onoto' fountain pens made by De La Rue. Even 100 year old pens work beautifully with the minimum of restoration. One even was raised from a ship sunk by a sub in 1916, and worked beautifully after a rubber and cork seal was replaced. This was 2012, with the pen having spent 96 years at the bottom of the English Channel. The gold nibs are a joy to use, making the roughest of paper feel like silk and encouraging wildly expressive florishes in your writing as they flex under the lightest of pressures. Anyone making nibs of that quality these days could sell thousands.

Definitely the best of British manufacturing. I just don't want to think about Platignum or Osmoroid's output in the 1970's.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: What Is The Most Beautiful 'Thing' In The World?
05/08/2018 14:10:11
Posted by mechman48 on 05/08/2018 11:44:00:

Watching the birth of one of your children takes some beating.

George.

As an exercise in needless horror and pain that caused flashbacks followed by panic attacks, the birth of my two couldn't be bettered. A pleasurable or beautiful one was the last thing to describe it. Seeing my wife turn into a mindless being trying to climb the walls while bleeding seriously to get away from the unbearable pain is a sight that will stay with me forever. That would describe being present for the birth of my two. How I wished for the days when blokes were kept well away from the birth. First brat was 10lb 2 oz and the medics believed she was small despite the ultrasound scans - and they obviously knew better - so no need for much pain relief in a natural birth. The birth process at Medway was characterized by medical arrogance of the first water from start to finish and it was a thoroughly horrible experience.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Hand files for aluminium
05/08/2018 10:55:47

I do not know of any and have never come across any.

In one of his books, Guy Lautard suggests keeping files permanently in cutting/tapping oil and re- dipping regularly. That way pins will never stick to the teeth. Others suggest chalking the file. I think both work, but I dislike the chalking idea, rubbing a file on rock strikes me as a good way to blunt it. And dipping the file in oil is messy.

Regards,

Richard

Thread: Chain Hoist Tripod in MEW 264
05/08/2018 10:49:12

I made an A frame support frame from pallet timber about 10 years back. The main timbers were 3x3 and 4x2 info. Stressed it after building and ended up with a conservative 1.5 tonne breaking load, so rated it at .25 tonne with a reserve of 6. Home stuff can be very over designed. Left it outside over winter and wouldn't trust it after that - so it became firewood.

On the 'Backyardmetslcasting.com' site Lionel shows a lifting frame picking a motorcycle off his Ute. That one is strong enough, but not safe due to the risk of offset loads and swinging. Needs a couple of braces otherwise the welds could fail due to lack of triangulation. It's from simple scaffold pole.

Regards

Richard

Thread: Couple of things at Lidl
04/08/2018 21:56:32

I keep all my sticks in the airing cupboard and stick in the end of a blow torch flame just before using. The arc strikes a bit better when hot.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: What Is The Most Beautiful 'Thing' In The World?
04/08/2018 21:50:48

Most beautiful 'thing'. There can only be one answer.

The view across Alaska and the Yukon from ''The Top of the World Highway' near the settlement of 'Chicken' in Alaska in late autumn (end of August). The highway runs along a ridge and you can see 50 miles at least on either side. The only indication of humans is the road. It's totally devoid of human made sound. The V shaped valleys in late autumn are cloaked in gold and scarlet as the leaves of the willow scrub change, interspersed with the sparce black stubble of centuries old pine trees struggling to make 5ft high. It is the most beautiful place (thing) I have ever seen. Absolutely breathtaking, but such moments are fleeting in such a wild area, the very fact that makes such jewel like memories.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: How to drill holes in ABS plastic without splintering?
04/08/2018 19:36:02

I always drill through plastic into wood. Pallet timber is adequate.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Digital Calipers
03/08/2018 20:52:15

Our predecessors managed by long apprenticeships and a lifetime of learning.

We have to make up for our time and experience poverty by more expensive machines. To get good results on a basic machine your skill has to make up for the lack from the machine. Not something that all of us can supply.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: Old reamer
02/08/2018 11:04:12
Posted by Hopper on 02/08/2018 01:56:09:

... The military knew what they were about when it came to preserving parts.

When it came to ammunition/other 'bang' stuff, the packing methods for hot, humid climates were woefully inadequate and there were huge numbers of dud rounds as a result. The WD and later MOD response was to effectively create a packaging industry for these environments. Now the boxes are considered part of the weapon system for some of the more sophisticated fire & forget systems in more recent times - and the boxes are surprisingly high tech.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Arbor Press Question
30/07/2018 22:57:39

Just thinking,

If it doesn't work well, could you locally draw the temper with a jewellers torch and use a wet cloth to limit the area heated? Once the small area of drawn temper is done, it might be soft enough to mark more easily.

Regards

Richard

Thread: What did you do Today 2018
30/07/2018 22:50:27

Good thing there are no cats about, because there is no way on earth one wouldn't find a way in. Have to ask - is the propensity for an astrophysics degree contagious, using a telescope as the vector? If so.. it'll be a loss to the hobby.

Regards

Richard

Thread: Can anyone identify this?
30/07/2018 22:42:24

Reminds me vaguely of something I saw briefly once at university. A polarimeter. It was used for stress analysis of complex shapes before finite element analysis. A screw applied an accurately measured deflection to a clear acrylic profile via a point load, then there were two polarising sheets, one fixed and one rotated to make the stress patterns visible when white light was shone through the profile. Have to confess my recollection is hazy as I wasn't the slightest bit interested in it at the time, so I may be wrong, but this may be missing only 2 bits, the polarising filters and a clear acrylic profile.

Regards

Richard.

 

Edited By richardandtracy on 30/07/2018 23:00:25

Thread: ME page 217 & 218
30/07/2018 22:31:10
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 30/07/2018 22:11:08:

Could it be that the authorities apply common sense to these situations?...

What!?! And break the habit of centuries?

Can't see that ever happening.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: Drill Press Motor Mounting
29/07/2018 16:54:50

Thinking of the contact areas of a round belt compared to a V belt and the liklihood of slippage. Gut feel would suggest it'll take about 1/4 the torque. At the higher speeds it should do, but at the low speed range of the press it's possible/probable it'll struggle.

Just my initial reaction.

Richard.

 

Edited By richardandtracy on 29/07/2018 16:55:29

Thread: Friction Turning a Smoke Box Door
29/07/2018 12:21:15

I have used double sided fibre reinforced carpet tape in such situations. The problem is not getting it to stick, but getting the work off undamaged afterwards. Warming the work up helps.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: Myford ML10 vs The Rest
29/07/2018 12:04:45

Jeff,

One further reminder - probably not needed, but you never know - remember the lathe is for bits for the boat. Getting a lathe is not the end of the purpose. It's all too easy to get diverted by the machinery enthusiasts and forget about the primary purpose, and myopically look at the lathe without remembering what it's for.

Regards,

Richard.

29/07/2018 10:41:14

Jeff,

When I chose my lathe it was with a view to using it for most machined components while building a yacht from scratch. The two biggest items I needed to machine were the prop shaft (25mm diameter) and the winch castings. Looking at commercial winches of the right capacity, the drum diameter was 6", so I reckoned 7" swing over the saddle was what I needed when machining up my own castings. The prop shaft diameter meant a spindle bore of 25mm, so that was the minimum. I ended up with the Warco version of the Clarke 430/Sealy 27/Draper something or other/Chester Model B. This had a 12" swing & 26mm bore and did all the threading etc needed. And last year I bought a 2nd one for £600 to convert to CNC. So they are available at the same price as a Myford 10.

I honestly suggest that before you buy a machine, or even think about what machine you get, you think long and hard about what you want to do with the machine, then add a reasonable percentage to the size to make life easier when machining. Machining right on the capacity limit of a machine doubles setup time and trebles the machining difficulty compared to having an inch or two spare room.

Hope my comment trigger a thought or two. Buying a machine is too expensive to go into half cocked and needs to be right, especially as it's money being diverted from the project boat and needs to pay for itself to justify the purchase at all.

Regards

Richard.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
ChesterUK
Meridienne; London MES
Ausee.com.au
Warco
Eccentric Engineering
Eccentric July 5 2018
TRANSWAVE Converters
cowbells
Allendale Electronics
emcomachinetools
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest