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Member postings for choochoo_baloo

Here is a list of all the postings choochoo_baloo has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Ferrous, facing, HSS tool geometry
26/10/2021 14:32:30

This is precisely what's keeping me going on this long path, Lee wink

Posted by Lee Rogers on 24/10/2021 15:59:33:

Above all enjoy the day when you turn out a perfect finish with a tool that you made .

25/10/2021 02:16:43

So I knocked up a LH knife tool to use parallel to lathe axis as was advised. Pleasingly it produced a smooth/free cutting finish.

BUT...I noticed after a second pass (silver steel round) the tool developed a little knick at cutting edge. Thta would explain why, despite being bang on centre height, the final few mm of inward travle has a much rougher surface finish. Please look at the photo; I've circled the defect. Sorry but it's hard to expose correctly given the shiny steel (told you surface finish was otherwise good!)

All of this, is to ask: is the generic HSS to blame (cheap bundle from RDG) ie should I upgrade to a better quality HSS blank? Admittedly I'd assumed that on hobby machines at least, HSS was much of a muchness.

Has anyone bought Rennie HSS blanks (pleasingly they're made in England). I think I'll try some of these.

https://www.rennietool.co.uk/collections/all-toolbits

 

Edited By choochoo_baloo on 25/10/2021 02:17:03

Edited By JasonB on 25/10/2021 08:51:54

25/10/2021 02:05:04

I should have said in OP, I have been trying to follow Sparey's approximate geometries; without obsessing about angles.

And yes been using a simple tilting table on my bench grinder. Honed the corner and working edges with a DMT diamond hone - must say I'm pretty pleased how tools turned out.

Thread: Collets for Myford tailstock
23/10/2021 14:22:29

Thanks chaps, appreciate all the advice.

I should have said that it was actually Cutwel technical advisor who recommended this. So in the spirit of sharing knowledge, they advised: (who themselves do lots of proper engineering themselves),

For a Myford size, power tapping with tail stock collet is the smart choice esp can maximise squareness and rigidity. Furthermore the motion of hand tapping actually slightly degrades the thread form due to the repeated forward and backward necessary to clear chips. Cause a slightly looser fit. Plus get the powder metal HSS which are more shock absorbant by their nature.

(Must say was refreshing change to have a long friendly chat with experts. On phone for about 30 min!)

Edited By choochoo_baloo on 23/10/2021 14:24:02

23/10/2021 03:25:17

I want to give power tapping a few metric on my ML7 a go whereby a machine tap is held in the tailstock.

To do so will require the tap to be held in a tailstock collet. I already own the Myford patent collets (those using a 1 1/8" Whit closing ring). Annoyingly I can't see these workign on the taslktock becuase any required adaper would constrict the 2MT bore.

So if I need to source another collet design,simplcity and cost, woudl plain 2MT collets suffice:

https://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue/Collets/Morse-Taper-Collets/MT2-Collets-Metric-Sizes

If so can I use M10 studding with a washer and nut at far end of tailstock barrel for the drawbar?

Thread: Ferrous, facing, HSS tool geometry
23/10/2021 02:45:26
Posted by Ramon Wilson on 22/10/2021 23:35:20:

I've been advocating using HSS on a Myford (as opposed to insert tooling) for many years now but I confess that when it comes to grinding 'correct' profiles I'm hopeless cause.

Fundamentally I have three basic shapes on the go all the time one left hand knife for turning, one right hand for facing and a tapered round nose tool for finishing either. This latter is probably the most used 'stock' tool.

If possible could you upload some photos please? As said above, I am keen to learn more about effective HSS grinding!

23/10/2021 02:43:39
Posted by not done it yet on 22/10/2021 23:13:30:

There is not too much need for ‘experimenting’ - it has all been done time after time and more times. Stick to the accepted norms is my advice.

That's precisly my point; I've struggled to find much (Sparey aside) on HSS geometry for facing.

Turning/boring/parting all have plently of references. Just struggled to find many for facing.

23/10/2021 02:41:03
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 22/10/2021 18:14:46:

Sparey's "The Amateur's Lathe" is my bible when it comes to HSS.

One of my older books, can't find the stupid thing, tabulates a full page of different tool shapes for roughing, finishing and other purposes. I suspect the variety of shapes date from the Carbon Steel era: in comparison HSS is very forgiving.

With a knife, Sparey suggests finish is achieved by setting the tool almost parallel to the work to produce a rubbing action in conjunction with slow turning speed, fine-feed, and plenty of lubricant. Works for me.

Thanks Dave I have read that chapter of Sparey. When I tried to follow his advice (ie RH knife for facing) I suffer chatter each time.

...Does Sparey mean swapping in a LH knfe, exploiting this rubbing, and moving perpendicualr to the end face? I admit I found his bit unclear.

22/10/2021 16:50:55

Hello all. I'm new to home metalwork, and have at long last had the time to start experimenting with grinding my own HSS tools for my ML7 lathe.

I'm now experimenting with obtaining the best surface finish when facing steel(s), and am hoping this thread can be a convenient reference for me and others to learn other approaches. I gather HSS tooling is rarely 'only one way will work'.

My current approach is:

use parallel (to lathe axis) QCTP station, ~ 1mm radius round nose, LH so as to cut into the centre. (I will upload a photo later when I get chance!)

Please do contribute, all advice gratefully received.

Edited By choochoo_baloo on 22/10/2021 16:51:59

Thread: Under & over reamers?
30/09/2021 23:58:09

More a curiosity for me at this stage

I just watched a machinist video whereby the nomial diamter of a silver steel dowel didn't have a smooth sliding fit into a reamed hole. She then explains that's why 'under/above reamers sets' exist. Presumably, in Imperial, these would b +/- 1 thou of the nominal size? I've seen a couple of American sellers offer them.

After some searching, no one in this country seems to sell them? Is it instead common practise to buy buys the explicit reamer size e.g 0.501" for an oversize 1/2" hole.

Would appreciate some clarity on this. Thanks in advance.

Thread: General sharpening direction help
12/09/2021 11:38:57

I’ve been reading up and watching videos and sharpening various workshop tools Working through my various scissors using the DMT mini hones. However there is an inconsistency (which is never good in this hobby of ours!)

DMT say scissors/knives should be stroked back from the edge/edge first.

Whereas a lot of woodworkers sometimes sharpen plane blade & chisels edge first on first grind (eg a Tormek water cooled wheel), but then final grind is back to edge/edge last on a waterstones.

My thinking is that sharpen any blade shouldn’t matter on the tool; it seems natural to do edge first strokes throughout, so that burrs are pushed away from the edge. Is this correct?

Any comments gratefully received.

Thread: MEW 162 - "Resurrecting a Colchester" article
12/08/2021 23:26:09

Thanks Brian but another member has managed to send it across. Thank you for the offer though.

Thread: Myford Lathe Service
12/08/2021 14:04:56

I too would like to know the answer to this, Colin.

Thread: MEW 162 - "Resurrecting a Colchester" article
11/08/2021 21:31:23

I don't suppose some kind soul could email me a scan of MEW Issue 162; "Resurrecting a Colchester" article?

After consulting Harold Hall's index site, I think this will be a good article, but sod's law says it's not in my back issue pile...

Thread: Recommended lathe outside protection?
09/08/2021 00:30:16
Posted by Steviegtr on 07/08/2021 22:22:31:

Petrol will do the job fine . It does not attack paint. But personally i would try white spirit. No fags in the mouth either.

If that is no good then good old Gunk.

Steve.

Edited By Steviegtr on 07/08/2021 22:23:44

Are you sure both petrol and white spirit do *not* attack hardened paint, Steve? I've read contradictory advice elsewhere...! Obvs want to be sure before slapping it on.

Edited By choochoo_baloo on 09/08/2021 00:30:53

07/08/2021 20:29:08

Dear all, after a long hiatus I'm finally getting ready to clean the "Dinitrol Metallic" off of my Colchester Master Mk1.

Whilst the Dinitrol data sheet says cleaning using "petroleum spirit", with usual caveat of being an inexperienced metalworker, can one of you chaps confirm that:

liberal use of neat petrol won't harm the original lathe paintwork in any way? Be it the painted information plates plates or the main cast body work.

Thanks in advance.

Thread: Replacment oil can spout
05/04/2021 21:44:56

Hello all, I remembered I have this Wesco can (1960s vintage I think?). However the spout has snapped. It still pumps well!

Is it possible to buy replacment spouts? It looks like the new spares have a much smaller thread to attach to the can. The Wesco has a retaining collar - see picture. I do prefer to repair and re-use if possible. Especially compared to the poor performance of the modern Chinesium ones I've used angel

Any suggestions are very welcome. Thank you.

img_3310.jpg

Thread: How to restore artists' brush bristles
14/12/2020 00:44:25

I have used some expensive artists brushes, on and off for years for touch up work with machinery enamel for my tools.

Can anyone recommend how to restore the bristles shape, since it's gradually splayed. See photo.

(In the early days I probably wasn't as thorough cleaning...)

In case relevant, brushes are Daler-Rowney dark-tipped synthetic filaments and black shadow aluminium ferrule. Designed for acrylic paint apparently.

Thank you.

brush.jpg

Thread: Help identifying "garter type" oil seals
11/07/2020 15:08:49

It seems I need to replace the "garter type oil seals" (as the MEW restoration article author describes them), for the oil bath power feed gearbox shafts that pass through the cast iron body into the oil reservoir, on my Senior M1 mill.

However a google search has failed to bring up anything with the "garter" label. Hence can anyone suggest what are the correct seals I need, obviously imperial sizes. I'm new to all of this!

Thread: I particularly enjoy the recent Myford restoration articles
05/07/2020 18:32:02

Feedback is always helpful, good or bad. As such I wanted to say that a highlight of my MEW subscription over the past 12 months or so have been the few Myford restoration articles by Peter Barker. As a self-taught home machinist, the thorough but unpretentious style bas been very informative. I've had many "oh so now that xx makes sense" reading them!

Niel Wyatt - I know you're a responsive Editor, so I thought it was worth mentioning the above.

I hope more maintenance type articles on the popular brand machines might be included in future editions. I expect they're quite popular. Particularly as COVID restrictions continue to ease.

All in all, a great magazine!

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