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Member postings for Nigel Rice

Here is a list of all the postings Nigel Rice has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Chinese DRO opinions
22/02/2020 11:02:24
Posted by Nigel Rice on 21/02/2020 20:04:51:

Sam

I took delivery of my Chinese 3 axis DRO for my mill yesterday and I am over the moon!

LINK

At £131.48 delivered through Poland - so no taruffs, duties or extra charges it seemd too good to be true. This was the complete kit with 5 micron magnetic scales.

I ordered in early January and was advised on ordering that there would be a delay due to Chinese New Year. I was advised of shipment and departure from Poland, the final carrier was DHL with a signed for delivery in perfect condition.

Everything sprung into life on powering up, (only snag being European plug that needed changing). The control panel is fitted to my mill and the X axis scale should be operational tomorrow.

The only downside is the sophistication of the control panel against a unit I was using some 30 years ago!

Nigel

Nigel your link is for glass scales

Dave

Whoops! Thanks for your correction, they are indeed glass scales. I had spent many hours comparing suppliers and my eye locked onto the supply from Poland and ignored the detail.

I am still pleased with my buy though hate having to come to terms with old age and decling brain cells!

Nigel

21/02/2020 20:04:51

Sam

I took delivery of my Chinese 3 axis DRO for my mill yesterday and I am over the moon!

LINK

At £131.48 delivered through Poland - so no taruffs, duties or extra charges it seemd too good to be true. This was the complete kit with 5 micron magnetic scales.

I ordered in early January and was advised on ordering that there would be a delay due to Chinese New Year. I was advised of shipment and departure from Poland, the final carrier was DHL with a signed for delivery in perfect condition.

Everything sprung into life on powering up, (only snag being European plug that needed changing). The control panel is fitted to my mill and the X axis scale should be operational tomorrow.

The only downside is the sophistication of the control panel against a unit I was using some 30 years ago!

Nigel

Thread: How should I check a milling machine?
04/12/2019 11:24:39

Iain

I bought an Aciera F3, sight unseen, about 4 years ago and have not regretted it. The machine had been neglected and abused, main motor and coolant pump burnt out, about 12 collects, but all this was reflected in the price.

There is a users group **LINK**

that is very helpful and has detailed drawings of the machine on file.

I stripped my machine completely, a delight to work on and logically engineered. The bedways are well sized and showed little wear even after years of neglect. Someone had attempted to pump grease into the slideways! Gib strips required a little scraping and a good clean and repaint. Motor replaced with Chinese cheapo and VFD.

The Schaublin W20 collet syatem is a pain as the collets are expensive. I now have an adapter and use E32 collets. I enjoy using this robust machine, would sometimes like a larger table, quill, DRO, etc, but need to have something to dream about!

Nigel

Thread: Hello from the Lake District
19/11/2019 11:24:44
Posted by Mark Eden 1 on 19/11/2019 09:02:34:

Thanks David, your mod looks exactly what I need although not sure how to get over the hurdle of needing to machine the machine that machines? What was your solution? Did your post look like the attached? It looks like its threaded 1/2"BSW so not compatible with your M10 fixings?

pdweheemqpyfraza8kspvg.jpg

Mark

A possible solution would be to find someone locally with suitable machines! How local is Kendal to you?

Nigel

18/11/2019 20:24:09

Welcome to the forum Mark. I live in Kendal and have established my workshop behind my house. I have an Aciera F3 mill and have just installed my pride and joy, a Hardinge HLV lathe. You are welcome to call in.

Nigel

Thread: facing plastic rod
28/11/2017 12:29:08

My preference for all plastics is zero or negative rake on the tool - this will certainly prevent digging in and pulling the work from the chuck.

In order to prevent the continuous ribbons of swarf from tangling, I've never found a way of breaking this with the tool, I used high speeds and threw the swarf as a continuous ribbon into the air and clear of work and machine.

Nigel

Thread: Level lathe set up
20/08/2017 15:33:54

I have enjoyed following this thread with the differing elements concerned. I trained at the Humber Motor Co., Coventry during the early 50's and was involved with the installation of a new machine shop for the Hillman Minx OHV engine. The largest machine was a horizontal broaching machine for machining 5 faces simultaneously on the cast iron engine block. This weighed in at about 200 tons, stood upon 3' of concrete, if I remember aright. Machine tools were "leveled" using steel wedges and a precision level. I do not recall any being bolted down. The in house foundry produced the cast iron castings and these were left to "weather" for 8 to 12 months. I subsequent machine shops the only item I ever bolted down were bar feeds for capstan lathes.

With a retirement workshop and Myford ML7 as lathe, I have mounted this on two pillars of concrete blocks. In a previous workshop I cast a concrete base but had problems with the shuttering as I had not calculated the not inconsiderable weight involved! I "leveled" with a builders level but used a laser mounted at the two extremes of the bed to remove twist. This worked well, with the opposite workshop wall being some 4 metres distance and the laser "spots" initially having about 75mm vertical separation. With the use of shims and holding down bolts this was reduced to zero. It may not be "level", but I believe it is aligned! No vibrations are detected in this set up.

Thread: Photograph of Wolf Cub drill wanted
17/03/2013 09:06:16

This post has awakened a few memories! A Wolf Cub was my first "machine" tool, purchased for £4.19.6 with money earnt working as a temporary postman over Christmas of 1947. Parts were later added to turn it into a wood turning lathe and drill press. I was so proud!

Thread: Cutting oil
07/12/2012 17:14:08

Dean

When in industry, I always bought cutting oil and other lubricants from Millers Oils, Brighouse. OK, we were buying some oils in 50 gal drums, but they always supplied me with 1L bottles of oils if I wanted.

Very helpful company, worth a try if you can call in to collect.

Nigel

Thread: Home made lathe stand - need help!
06/12/2012 08:24:38

Frank

If you have a concrete floor then might I suggest you look at concrete? I have my Myford mounted on two pillars of concrete blocks cemented together, and this absorbs any vibrations. I had, in another location, formed shuttering and poured a concrete base.

I am planning to mount a bench milling machine on a pedestal of hollow concrete blocks and then pour concrete to fill the hollows.

Post WW 2 there was quite a bit of discussion about manufacturing machine tool beds from concrete! Cheaper than steel and better at vibration absorbtion.

Nigel

Thread: which 3 or single phase motor for ML7
26/11/2012 20:06:53

Ron,

I converted my ML7 to a three phase motor running off domestic supply via an ABB invertor about a year ago and have been very pleased with the results. Smoother running, ramped start and reverse, variable speed, and with a pulley change, top revs of 840.

If you are buying a three phase motor second hand, ensure that it is dual voltage, i.e. the motor plate mentions 220-240 and 420-440 volts. No wide experience of different makes of phase invertors, but I've had no problems with mine.

Nigel

Thread: Converting a Bridgeport from 3 phase to single
01/11/2012 08:32:51

Matt. I ran a Bridgeport with J head for many years off a single phase 240v supply by use of a phase converter. The same converter ran a 3hp compressor and a rather complex variable speed motor on a Holbrook 17 lathe.

The phase converter uses a transformer to up the voltage and capacitors to start the motor, which when running, generates the third phase. This is probably why you are advised to bypass contactors.

I used a slave motor, (cannot remember size), which I would switch on for starting - this meant 3 phases to the machine, and no problems with wiring through normal control box. With the Bridgeport this meant the head with both speeds, coolant pump and DRO.

With the compressor and lathe I could switch off the slave once the machine was running, but with the Bridgeport I had to keep the slave running. I don't know why, but the head motor made 'orrible noises with the slave off. This combination ran for about 15 years with no problems.

Nigel

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