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Member postings for ronan walsh

Here is a list of all the postings ronan walsh has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Moore and wright tools
27/03/2018 16:25:52

I know the old Sheffield and UK made Moore and Wright micrometers and metrology tools, were well made. But has anyone any experience of the modern stuff, which i presume are made in Asia ? Are they accurate and hardwearing ?

Thread: Hoglet Build
22/03/2018 21:32:10

Thanks Jason. maybe a single cylinder engine would be good to do first.

22/03/2018 20:01:13

Where are the plans available for this little engine ?

Thread: Fred Dibnah auction
07/03/2018 15:56:19

A lot of that tat has nothing to do with Fred. Caveat emptor.

Thread: Maplin Electronics Stores
20/02/2018 17:02:02

Went into maplin in Dublin twice last week and twice i was given the incorrect item by incompetent staff. I wanted a new lnb for my satellite dish. These are usually 40mm in diameter, but my dish takes 37mm for some reason. Anyway the first time i did not know this and bought a "universal" lnb as the spotty youf behind the counter swore it would fit.

Brought it back and met an even more idiotic female, who swapped it for one that "will fit for sure", i asked had she a calipers behind the counter, and she did not know what that was, so i took a chance, which of course did not pay off. To say i dislike maplin is an understatement.

But sadly there are few alternatives.

Thread: Motorcycle General Discussion
19/02/2018 20:05:13
Posted by duncan webster on 19/02/2018 17:18:48:

I had a job as a graduate apprentice with BSA due to start in September 1971. Woke up one morning in August to find I'd been made redundant by post, not a good start to my engineering career!
​However, during the 3 day interview (yes you read it right), we met up with the guys who had designed the triple. they stated that the vertical split arrangement was only ever meant to demonstrate that a 3 cylinder bike would work, and that they wanted to redo it as horizontally split for production. The management wouldn't hear of it as it would have meant spending money on machine tools. Quite why they couldn't have got someone else to do that bit I never did find out. They also had ideas for just sawing the end off to make a 500cc twin, what was left over would make a single, but perhaps vertical split is the way to go for singles. They managed to waste money on making the Triumph and BSA versions subtly different, one had sloping cylinders I seem to remember

The AMC twin with centre bearing were notorious for bottom end problems, was this due to lack of alignment?

I always thought the centre bearing would be a good idea on the twins, but apparently not, the popular theory is that the crank is going to flex, so let it. I would assume that seeing as most car engines, even back then, had bearings supporting the crank in the centre, then it would be do-able in the bike engines, line-boring ?

19/02/2018 17:17:55
Posted by daveb on 19/02/2018 16:54:38:
Posted by ronan walsh on 19/02/2018 16:42:55:

I got talking to an old boy at the local jumble years ago, it was a hilarious conversation. He like most had reached an age when the aches, pains and other health issues had put him off his classic bikes, so reluctantly he sold them off. After a while and missing motorcycling, he was advised to buy a "modern" royal oilfield single with electric start. All the looks and positives of classic motorcycles, with none of the negatives (ho ho ho).

So he went and bought a brand new out of the dealers showroom Bullet with leccy start. Then the calamity started, The miracle electric start packed up, the clutch fell off the end of the gearbox mainshaft, the wheel bearings went, the steering head bearings went, everything chromed started to rust, the big end went, and when it was replaced, the conrod was found to be bent, and all the aluminium castings took to corrode.

Well I'll be blowed! They made it just like a genuine British bike. I've been looking at these for a while, can't quite decide if I want one.

In all fairness, the British bikes were never that bad, they did heat treat components, the chrome plating was good, they did use bearings from good manufacturers. Also most british bikes makers were out of business by the early 1970's, thirty years later the indian makers should be able to do a far better job of them. Apparently heat treatment and tolerances are alien concepts in India.

19/02/2018 16:42:55

I got talking to an old boy at the local jumble years ago, it was a hilarious conversation. He like most had reached an age when the aches, pains and other health issues had put him off his classic bikes, so reluctantly he sold them off. After a while and missing motorcycling, he was advised to buy a "modern" royal oilfield single with electric start. All the looks and positives of classic motorcycles, with none of the negatives (ho ho ho).

So he went and bought a brand new out of the dealers showroom Bullet with leccy start. Then the calamity started, The miracle electric start packed up, the clutch fell off the end of the gearbox mainshaft, the wheel bearings went, the steering head bearings went, everything chromed started to rust, the big end went, and when it was replaced, the conrod was found to be bent, and all the aluminium castings took to corrode.

It was like fate was paying a cruel joke on him, the dealers advice was to find a dimly lit stretch of canal and do the honourable thing.

I was looking at both a kawasaki w800 and the new triumph bonneville at the weekend, both well made machines that are reliable.

Thread: Setting an internal micrometer
14/02/2018 16:44:29

Can you not send it back to the manufacturer for calibration ? Might be the easiest way to do it.

Thread: Motorcycle General Discussion
14/02/2018 14:15:09
Posted by Bob Rodgerson on 14/02/2018 10:22:40:

I agree with Mike,

I have on the bench at the moment, a BSA Fury Engine which came out of the research department at Umberslade Hall I am building the engine up from part machined castings and a crankshaft/conrod assembly to, hopefully a working engine when it is finished. It is a long term project that is nearing completion with both crank case halves machined and the lower valve drive train and oil pump drives sorted. The cylinder head will be the next thing to be machined to accept the camshafts and once this is done I will machine the Hemispherical shape for each cylinder before it goes off to a cylinder head specialist to have seats and guides fitted.

The engine is very Honda like being a DOHC twin with the camshafts running directly in the Alloy Cylinder head rather than bearing bushes or needle rollers. Had more money had been available to develop it and improve reliability it could well have become the machine to beat it's Japanese rivals. However I do think that by the early 70's a 350cc engine was the wrong size to go for, people, then were wanting bigger OHC engined bikes and a 750 version would probably have been the right size to go for.

An interesting project Bob. Love to see pictures of that engine. What i did hear about the fury/bandit, being an Edward Turner design, its basically flimsy, and still suffers the old problems, like vertically split crankcases, which are more prone to oil leakage. The man to sort out triumph would have been Doug Hele, but sadly again he got free reign, the money was drying up fast as the japanese took over the market.

13/02/2018 16:51:22
Posted by JimmieS on 13/02/2018 16:45:24:

One of the so called 'cottage industries' for the motorcycle restorers

.**LINK**

I wondered whatever happened to him. He had a place in Yorkshire and was big into making uprated parts for Triumph tiger cubs, a favourite with the pre 65 trials mob. Glad its working out well for him.

13/02/2018 16:31:58
Posted by Mike Poole on 13/02/2018 14:12:07:

I don't think the engineers at Triumph/BSA were short of ideas on how to build a modern engine with modern machinery but the money to buy it just wasn't there. I believe the Trident/Rocket3 were intended to be built like Japanese engines but that would have meant retooling so it had to be built like the twins. John Bloor showed what could be achieved with a clean sheet and sufficient money. The workers realised they had been let down by bad management but learned a hard lesson that the real world wasn't ready for a workers coop.

Mike

Edited By Mike Poole on 13/02/2018 14:13:16

Yes, bad management and greedy investors, never any profits set aside for reinvestment. Some of the machinery sold off during the closure of the Meriden factory in the early 1980's, was pre-war manufactured ! Unthinkable in this day and age, i believe in the new triumph factory, all the machinery is replaced every three years, regardless of condition.

13/02/2018 13:12:01
Posted by thaiguzzi on 13/02/2018 08:22:33:

Don't forget, mid 60's onwards, money was getting ever tighter, especially with the nutters in the BSA boardroom, and the way what money was there, was spent frivously. Bernard Docker anyone? Slumberglade Hall?

The downfall of Meriden Triumph, began in earnest when BSA started taking ever more interest in the concern, mid 60's onwards, because it out produced Small Heath, with less employees, and a more saleable product. (BSA brought Triumph in late 50's?).

Plenty of excellent books out there - read them and weep.

From a man who has more than one Triumph tattoo.....

I was reading about the infamous Nora the other day, presenting the bsa/triumph board with outrageous bills for her latest fur coats and other outfits. She reckoned that she was justified, because she appeared on show stands bedecked in her finery, i can just imagine the faces of the ton-up boys standing there looking at her draped over a bike.

Not good.

13/02/2018 13:08:51

I am building a 90 degree triumph engine at the moment. It can be done using the stronger norton commando crankshaft, which i am sure you know, has two throws bolted to a central flywheel. A relatively simple task of making a new flywheel, turning the timing side mainshaft to triumph dimensions.

Camshafts are available for the rephased crank, as are conrods to suit the norton crank in the triumph cases.

With a big bore kit the capacity ends up a little over 800cc. A toolmaker chap i know in Australia has done several of these conversions, and reports that even without dynamic balancing, the 90 degree engine is noticeably smoother than the smaller capacity 360 degree engine.

So Phil Irving and his theories were vindicated, and as Hinkley triumph twins are this configuration now, it appears to be the way to go.

12/02/2018 12:18:51
Posted by thaiguzzi on 12/02/2018 03:29:36:

Concur. One of THE greatest looking motorcycle engines. However, day to day riding, compared to a 650, too revvy and a bit gutless.

Now if they'd only made a 650-750 version of that top end externally...

By the way, I've owned and worked on Triumph twins for 35 years +. I had my own Meriden big twin shop in the UK for 15 years. Became rather well known by the time I sold up.

Posted by ronan walsh on 11/02/2018 15:47:18:

That all alloy engine was one of the best looking motorcycle engines ever made. I have the makings of a triton here, but have to finish rebuilding my old a10 golden flash first.

The time for meriden to completely revamp the engines was when they switched from pre-unit to unit construction. They stuck with the same cylinder spacing and 360 degree crankshaft. Instead of going wider and allowing larger bores, and they should have went with a 76, or 90 degree crank, it would have been easy to enlarge the engine and still have it vibrate less.

11/02/2018 15:47:18

That all alloy engine was one of the best looking motorcycle engines ever made. I have the makings of a triton here, but have to finish rebuilding my old a10 golden flash first.

Thread: Sine Protractor
11/01/2018 18:51:44

Looks a clever idea Steward, simple, but then the best ideas are often the simplest.

Thread: Tom Senior M1 suds belt
30/12/2017 15:42:20

If you wait til monday, i will pull the belt off my machine and measure it.

Thread: Recommendations for a quality milling vice?
30/12/2017 15:40:26

Abwood are good, but i think they are an old brand. I have one on my Tom Senior, its a nice size, but the problem with buying an old one is the wear it might have suffered. Rohm i do not like at all, any of their tool i used professionally, were bad quality, people get fooled by equating "made in Germany" to quality.

One problem i notice with small milling vices, is few make appropriately sized parallels for them.

Thread: John Stevenson
24/10/2017 00:27:34

Just stumbled across this thread as i only drop in here occasionally, but what terribly sad news to be greeted with. Sadly people like John are a dying breed, down to earth, knowledgable and helpful. Rest in peace to the man and condolences to his family.

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