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Mashstroy C210T / Warco 220 help please

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Roger Mountain12/02/2012 13:45:15
14 forum posts
8 photos
Hi Peter,
I did my slide locks by drilling through the adjustable gib block. The lock consisted of an M6 allen screw bearing on to a brass pad cut at 55 degrees bearing on to the dovetail. Yes it must weaken the gib block to a certain degree but they only need to be little more than finger tight to lock the slide.
 
Regards, Roger
Nicholas Farr12/02/2012 14:05:52
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1626 forum posts
832 photos
Hi Peter, I think the drawing itself is more or less the same, but the numbers are set out differently, which also has other numbers as well. I have scaned page E16 and put it in my Warco 220 album. seems as though there might be a difference in some of the manuals
 
Roger, that is the same page that I have in my pink manual.
 
My manual says it is factory number 213 and was made in 1993. I don't know if this coinsides with my lathe or not,because I haven't ever checked, it just came with the machine when I bought it about six years ago.
 
Regards Nick.
Ivy12/02/2012 14:06:05
19 forum posts
2 photos
OK, lets try again.
Here is my adjusting screw, the same as Rogers.
 

I was hoping to go through the adjustment procedure today but I have other problems today.
 
Here is a lesson in not using a 3 foot extension bar on your vice handle.
 

Pretty impressive for a 9 stone weakling.
That "was" a quality Record No2.
 
Actually this is all just an excuse to come into the warm and try to learn posting pictures.
So if it works this time thank you for all the IT help as well as everything else.
 
Incidentally I dislike computers with a passion but have to admit the internet is a fantastic resource and brilliant for contacting like minded people.
I better go and do something about that vice now, I have another in the shed somewhere.
 
Ivy.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 

Peter G. Shaw12/02/2012 19:28:35
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872 forum posts
36 photos
Hi all,
 
Right, we now have some very useful information.
Starting with serial nos & dates:
 
Ulf S/N 080 bought 1992
Roger S/N 084
Ivy S/N089 made 1992
Nick S/N 213 made 1993
Peter S/N 357 made 1994
 
A word of explanation: Ulf is a Swedish man I am in occasional contact with and who supplied information on his lathe when I was asking questions all those years ago.
 
It would seem that Roger's lathe, and probably Ulf's lathe were made in 1992.
 
Serial number, on mine at least, is stamped on the right hand end of the bed near the top just above the black (in my case) horizontal bar.
 
Drawings.
 
Nick's E16.
My E16 has the three rightmost diagrams and Nick's alternative diagram. I do not have the left most diagram.
 
Roger.
I do not have your diagram re the adjusting screw so thanks for that. Also, thanks for your description of the slide lock. For what it's worth, Ulf in Sweden did once say that he had dropped a nylon ball down one of the holes followed by a screw and was using that method of locking the cross-slide.
 
Ivy,
Wonderful good photo. Thanks for that. Sorry to hear about the vice though!
 
Additional comment on the manual.
Some time ago, Ulf sent me a drawing E41 for which he had no information yet it was printed in his manual, but not in mine. He thought it was for a slow speed adaptor, a view with which I eventually agreed after spending some considerable time studying it.
 
So, it seems that somewhere between Ivy's lathe and Nick's lathe, Mashstroy stopped fitting the screw. I have to wonder why. I think I will email Ulf in Sweden to get his thoughts on it because it seems most likely that he will have the screw.
 
Many thanks to all for your thoughts, ideas and information. It goes to show how good ideas can be passed around when people are collaborative..

Regards,
 
Peter
 
 

 
 
Roger Mountain13/02/2012 13:01:56
14 forum posts
8 photos
Hi Peter,
The reason I fitted slide locks was that some time ago I had planned to build a longcase clock movement and needed to lock my slides for the wheel cutting, never got round to it but still have the slide locks. I drilled the lubrication hole in the saddle is because my lathe is not fitted with any means of lubricating the saddle without removing the bed wipers.
Ivy, Iam very impressed with the vice, remind not to annoy you.
 
Regards, Roger
Peter G. Shaw13/02/2012 13:52:49
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872 forum posts
36 photos
Hi Roger,
 
Understand about the slide locks as it was always a source of concern and wonderment to me that they were not fitted by the manuacturer. I do think that using slide locks could contribute to reducing vibration in some situations, eg milling in the lathe.
 
Re your lack of saddle lubrication. On my lathe, there is a spring loaded ball bearing in a hole on the left hand side of the saddle. This hole is roughly halfway across the bed and halfway between the side of the saddle and the side of the cross-slide. The hole goes right through the saddle hence application of oil under pressure results in a pool of oil on the bed under the saddle which presumably gets spread about by the wipers.
 
I'll post a photo tomorrow. Can't do it today as I'm at my daughter's attempting to improve the lacksadaisical performance of her computer.
 
As an aside, there is an oil hole off-centre in the tailstock for the bearing next to the handle, and an identical spring loaded ball bearing type of oil hole immediately above the thrust washers on the right hand end of the leadscrew. Surprisingly, there are no oil holes for either the cross-slide leadscrew bearing or for the top-slide leadscrew bearing. I've added one for the cross-slide.
 
Regards,
 
Peter.
Peter G. Shaw14/02/2012 13:33:07
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872 forum posts
36 photos
Roger,
 
As promised, here is a photo showing my saddle lubrication point.
 

For what it's worth, the two white blobs to the left of the photo are an epoxy putty whilst the grey piece at the right is a piece of metal (steel or ally, don't know which). What I have done is to block all holes which are either not needed or don't need to go right through with either epoxy putty, or covered them with a small metal plate. This is to prevent swarf getting where I don't want it, ie onto the cross-slide dovetails or into the many holes near the apron. Although not shown, I also have a piece of flexible plastic and a bracket to fasten it on the back of the cross-slide and which uses the two rearmost 8mm tapped holes for fastening. The plastic sticks out and slides on the backpanel, the idea being to prevent swarf getting onto the uncovered saddle part of the cross-slide when the cross-slide is being wound towards the front. Photo can be provided if required.
 
Finally, I have contacted Ulf in Sweden, and he confirms that he also has the adjustment screw and that it does indeed make the handle harder to disengage, but does not seem to affect the engagement. He also confirms that he does have to press the handle down hard to get it to stay down. It is now looking more and more like an alteration to be done to my lathe.
 
Regards,
 
Peter G. Shaw
 

Roger Mountain14/02/2012 18:16:39
14 forum posts
8 photos
Hi Peter,
Snap, your saddle lubrication point is exacly in the same spot that I drilled mine for a countersunk screw which I remove to lubricate the saddle.
I don't have any problem with swarf getting down the screw holes in the cross slide as I normaly run with a home made boring table bolted down to the four theaded holes intended for mounting the vertical slide. This is due to the short length of the cross slide. The other screw hole on top of the saddle I use to mount my swarf tray.
Looks like you are thinking of fitting the grub screw to your lathe, It seems straight foward, the only probem being finding material for the pad, mine looks like car brake lining material.
 
Regards, Roger
 
 
Chris Hembry14/02/2012 18:39:19
40 forum posts
1 photos
Hi Peter,
 
Been reading this thread with interest as I also have one of these lathes. S/N 129 of 1993. Unfortunately I couldn't tell you whether it is fitted with the screw or not - will check tomorrow.
 
Regards, Chris

Edited By Chris Hembry on 14/02/2012 18:39:43

Peter G. Shaw14/02/2012 20:30:30
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872 forum posts
36 photos
Roger,
 
I used to have a swarf catching tray, but it kept getting in the way so I abandoned it.
 
I noted when I stripped the lathe a few months ago that the saddle lock used a piece of brass or copper. Ditto the three mandrel locking screws, hence that is what I would try initially. Other than that, perhaps a bit of shoe sole or heel material - that is usually quite hard wearing. Or maybe a piece of leather. Don't think a rubbery material would do as it might be too flexible. Nor would "plastic" - too slippery. Food for thought!
 
Chris,
 
Welcome to the 220 club.
 
Regards,
 
Peter
Chris Hembry15/02/2012 17:44:02
40 forum posts
1 photos
Peter,
 
Have now checked my lathe, and no screw is fitted so perhaps it was only fitted on the first 100 machines.
 
Regards, Chris
Peter G. Shaw15/02/2012 21:19:59
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872 forum posts
36 photos
Hi Chris,
 
Yes, it does indeed look as if it was only the earlier machines which had the screw fitted. Still intend to try it on mine though, but heaven alone knows when it will be - I seem to spend a lot of time doing other stuff (including reading threads on the internet).
 
Regards,
 
Peter G. Shaw
Alan Lewendon15/06/2012 15:46:30
2 forum posts

Can anyone recommend a quick change tool post for this lathe? Incidentally, I purchased mine in 1992 and it's serial no 083,

Alan

Roger Mountain16/06/2012 02:27:35
14 forum posts
8 photos

Hi Alan,

Yes I would recommend a Dickson (think that's how it's spelt), see my photos. It makes setting the cutting tool on centre so easy I wouldn't be without mine. In order to fit it to the lathe you will need to make up a new threaded mounting bush for the top slide and if you want to use the standard tool post bolt you will have to bush the the top of the tool post. Also you may have to take a skim off the tool post bolt to clear the dickson locking cams. None of these mods are irreversible and you can easily refit the original 4 position tool post if required.

Regards, Roger

Peter G. Shaw16/06/2012 13:02:23
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872 forum posts
36 photos

Hi Alan,

Welcome to the forum, and particularly this thread.

What do you think of this lathe?

Regards,

Peter G. Shaw

Springbok16/06/2012 15:35:47
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879 forum posts
34 photos

Have a look a grizzly.com you should be able to downllad a better manual

bob

Ivy16/06/2012 19:19:52
19 forum posts
2 photos
Posted by Springbok on 16/06/2012 15:35:47:

Have a look a grizzly.com you should be able to downllad a better manual

bob

I don't see any reference to Mashtroy/Warco 220 lathes there.

Matthew Turner 110/10/2013 17:52:47
1 forum posts

On a related note, does anyone know what type of collets the quick change uses? Doesn't seem to be in "Machinerys Handbook" anywhere, and it's not in the manual.

I've got the full set of metric, but a few imperial sizes would be more usefull to me.

Better yet, has anyone ordered extra collets?

Regards,

Matt Turner

Peter G. Shaw10/10/2013 20:14:51
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872 forum posts
36 photos

Hi Matt,

Ulf in Sweden, who also has a 220, wanted to know about the collets. He did some digging and found some information which he then sent to me by fax. If you send me your email address via the private message system, I can forward them to you if you wish. Be warned though that they are are copies of a fax and hence not perhaps the best.

For what it's worth, I use the Direct MT3 collets.

Regards,

Peter G. Shaw

kevin large06/04/2015 20:00:53
105 forum posts
9 photos

Hi guys just wondering if you guys still have your 220s

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