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Performance Power Tools Pillar Drill - replacing bearings? Help

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flintlockand steel19/05/2011 18:26:08
26 forum posts
2 photos
Hi
Just picked up a PP37012BD pillar drill for the workshop.
It's a big lump of a thing and had been used for woodworking.
Perhaps I've got the wrong machine for my needs as generally I'm drilling small castings and repairing, restoring old Flintlocks but wanted the flexibility it appeared to offer.
However there is a wobble in the bearings so was wondering if anyone had any experience in replacing them.
Also if anyone's got a hand book I'd really appreciate a copy so I can properly understand the beast.
Many thanks
Jon
CoalBurner19/05/2011 19:03:49
avatar
613 forum posts
80 photos
Hi Jon,
I bought a 'second' machine from Warco a couple of years agos as it had runout in the spindle bearings. This was easily rectified by boring out the cast in spindle bearings and replacing them with bronze bushes.
I have the luxury of an industrial milling machine so this was easy for me, however, I am sure if you have a local engineering company, for a reasonable fee they will be able to machine the bearings for you.
I am in Hampshire if you are local I may be ablen to assist.
 
regards
 
Graeme
flintlockand steel19/05/2011 20:50:28
26 forum posts
2 photos
The offer is appreciated but I'm 300 miles north. Mind you Interparcel can ship things like that for under £10.
I've not tried stripping it down yet but might tomorrow. There's a visible bearing at the top of the shaft above the chuck spindle looks as if it could be removed. I think there must be one under the top pulley as well. Will the pulley nut be left or right threaded?
Jon
Richard Parsons20/05/2011 09:13:59
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645 forum posts
33 photos

Most Pillar drill presses are the same only the sizes of bits differ.
The causes of ‘runout’ are:-

· A bent drill spindle.


· The chuck is not concentric with the shaft.


· The shaft bearings are worn.


· The spindle is worn.


· The quill (the bit that moves up and down carrying the spindle) is:


o It is worn


o Its sliding bearings are worn.


o It can rotate slightly and the spindle is not concentric.


· The spindle is loose in the quill. The spindle nuts need adjusting.


The only way to find out is to slowly strip the thing down checking, shaking and measuring as you go until you find the cause(s) of the problem. There may be more than one problem.


You ask about the nuts which hold things together. If you look down on the drill from above (or at a drill) you will see it rotates clockwise. The nuts will be made to tighten up in that direction of direction.


You say it has spent most of its life drilling wood I would suspect the bearings. Wood dust and oil make a good abrasive.


By the way there is another type of drill press. Here the spindle does not move up-down but the table does.


Regards


Dick

flintlockand steel20/05/2011 17:06:02
26 forum posts
2 photos
Think I might have partly sorted it.
There is a little rotational play in the splines going into the pulley but guess that's normal after a few years.
Not having a handbook it's been a bit difficult to assess what's what and what it's called.
However I noted an adjustment screw on the casting and found it tightened up the "quill" - for now the result is loads better than it was so I'll try it out over the weekend.
Many thanks for your input and guidance

Edited By Jon Harrison 2 on 20/05/2011 17:06:48

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