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Best Parting off tool

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Mick B106/12/2017 11:28:40
221 forum posts
9 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 06/12/2017 11:11:33:
Posted by ega on 06/12/2017 10:15:09:
Posted by Hopper on 05/12/2017 23:08:34:

Mate of mine bought a T shaped parting tool blade and holder from Eccentric. It has a strip of carbide along the top of the T. He uses it for putting circlip grooves in the outside diameter of hardened steel bearing races about 50mm diamter -- in a mini lathe. Can't complain about that for performance.

Hopper:

I couldn't find this interesting item on the EE website.

www.eccentricengineering.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=31&Itemid=45

I don't think my HSS blade would have a prayer on hardened races, but that's rather an outlier of a requirement and I've certainly never needed to do anything like that.

Even the link admits in the notes at the end that conditions and techniques for parting can be highly idiosyncratic. That old cartoon set I keep seeing here and in magazines illustrates only the extremes of a multidirectional spectrum.

I think nothing is ever perfect in all conditions, and that there ain't no best parting tool.

not done it yet06/12/2017 11:38:54
1264 forum posts
9 photos

Mick,

I think you may have missed this bit:

It has a strip of carbide along the top of the T

Mark P.06/12/2017 11:47:56
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567 forum posts
7 photos
I've been using a T shaped parting blade from Chronos, made my own holder myself, best parting blade I've ever had!
Mark P.
Mick B106/12/2017 13:00:40
221 forum posts
9 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 06/12/2017 11:38:54:

Mick,

I think you may have missed this bit:

It has a strip of carbide along the top of the T

Nah, saw that :D - and I'm sure it's good if you're trying to cut hardened stuff, but that doesn't necessarily make it the answer to every issue.

Fowlers Fury06/12/2017 15:34:05
avatar
128 forum posts
28 photos

Having experienced difficulties with the "Greenwood" type unless the TC bit was sharpened regularly on a diamond or CBN wheel, I followed a suggestion made by the owner of a small precision eng company. This was to part off with a slitting saw mounted on an arbour. Probably known to you all and It no doubt breaks all the "rules" yet works very well. When the contact tooth gets blunt, just rotate a little & use new one. New slitting saws aren't cheap but seem to appear in abundance at our M.E.Soc's auction nights. (The image shows parting PEEK CA30 piston rings).
06_parting ring blanks_2.jpg

KWIL06/12/2017 17:13:20
2813 forum posts
50 photos

The "Greenwood" type as referred to is a standard insert tool, (other makes are available). If you find you have to sharpen with a diamond (frequently) you are rubbing your way through and not cutting, These inserts need a strong and sustained infeed at the correct height..

SteveI06/12/2017 21:01:52
212 forum posts
16 photos
Posted by KWIL on 06/12/2017 17:13:20:

The "Greenwood" type as referred to is a standard insert tool, (other makes are available). If you find you have to sharpen with a diamond (frequently) you are rubbing your way through and not cutting, These inserts need a strong and sustained infeed at the correct height..

That is exactly my experience with the Greenwood tips. I found if I made it work. E.g. 50mm EN8 1000RPM power feed blue curls coming off the finish was better than I could get when facing with other tips. If I am honest it was a bit scary but my goodness they work well. However like I posted earlier I wore out the holder. I cannot recommend those Greenwood tools parting tips highly enough for performance and finish. The GFN-2 (JB cutting tools) and GFN-3 (ISCAR) tips I use now (Greenwood's were 2.6mm) are similar but not quite the mirror finish, good enough for me though.

Do you have a link to a standard blade holder either 19 or 26 size that takes these sandvik tips?

Thanks,

Steve

Fowlers Fury06/12/2017 22:03:47
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128 forum posts
28 photos

With your +ve comments about the "Greenwood" tips, do you both also use the standard holder? (The one shown unused in my image above). I'd be grateful for some guidance then because even though I carefully align the vertical "tip holding plate" parallel with the chuck body, it apparently flexes enough to end up with a distinctly dished cut-off piece. There's no discernable sideways movement in the top slide and the saddle is always clamped hard to the bed.
I had been using the TC tips from JB in the original Greenwood holder. Those showed this angled cut and I wondered if this caused the concave surface after parting (which doesn't show using the slitting saw & is thus now used exclusively).

tip x10.jpg

Muzzer06/12/2017 22:38:08
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2352 forum posts
400 photos
Posted by Fowlers Fury on 06/12/2017 15:34:05:

...part off with a slitting saw mounted on an arbour.....It no doubt breaks all the "rules"...

Its not about rules. The teeth are generally fine pitch and you need to ask how the swarf can escape from the throat of the tooth that's doing the cutting.

Murray

Muzzer06/12/2017 22:42:37
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2352 forum posts
400 photos
Posted by SteveI on 06/12/2017 21:01:52:
Do you have a link to a standard blade holder either 19 or 26 size that takes these sandvik tips?

Most suppliers keep these parting tools, eg Arc, APT Tools and all the usual ebay / Ali Express traders.

Murray

Chris Trice07/12/2017 00:50:08
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944 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Fowlers Fury on 06/12/2017 22:03:47:

With your +ve comments about the "Greenwood" tips, do you both also use the standard holder? (The one shown unused in my image above). I'd be grateful for some guidance then because even though I carefully align the vertical "tip holding plate" parallel with the chuck body, it apparently flexes enough to end up with a distinctly dished cut-off piece. There's no discernable sideways movement in the top slide and the saddle is always clamped hard to the bed.
I had been using the TC tips from JB in the original Greenwood holder. Those showed this angled cut and I wondered if this caused the concave surface after parting (which doesn't show using the slitting saw & is thus now used exclusively).

tip x10.jpg

In my experience, every time you put an angle on the end (usually the other way so there's no pip on the part being parted off), the blade does flex giving a dished surface.

ega07/12/2017 10:28:23
714 forum posts
80 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 06/12/2017 11:11:33:
Posted by ega on 06/12/2017 10:15:09:
Posted by Hopper on 05/12/2017 23:08:34:

Mate of mine bought a T shaped parting tool blade and holder from Eccentric. It has a strip of carbide along the top of the T. He uses it for putting circlip grooves in the outside diameter of hardened steel bearing races about 50mm diamter -- in a mini lathe. Can't complain about that for performance.

Hopper:

I couldn't find this interesting item on the EE website.

www.eccentricengineering.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=31&Itemid=45

Neil Wyatt:

Thanks for the link which, however, takes me to a page where the only reference to "carbide" is to indexable carbide tipped tools.

Jon08/12/2017 19:23:05
674 forum posts
32 photos
Posted by Fowlers Fury on 06/12/2017 22:03:47:

With your +ve comments about the "Greenwood" tips, do you both also use the standard holder? (The one shown unused in my image above). I'd be grateful for some guidance then because even though I carefully align the vertical "tip holding plate" parallel with the chuck body, it apparently flexes enough to end up with a distinctly dished cut-off piece. There's no discernable sideways movement in the top slide and the saddle is always clamped hard to the bed.
I had been using the TC tips from JB in the original Greenwood holder. Those showed this angled cut and I wondered if this caused the concave surface after parting (which doesn't show using the slitting saw & is thus now used exclusively).

tip x10.jpg

Its a left hand parting tip for leaving best finish on the left of job.
Looks rather rounded even though unused.

Right hand opposite of above leaves in theory clean finished cut to the right.

Neutrals just neutral.

Try Iscar tips wont go wrong.

Vic08/12/2017 20:34:06
1344 forum posts
1 photos

Posted by not done it yet on 06/12/2017 11:38:54:

Mick,

I think you may have missed this bit:

It has a strip of carbide along the top of the T

Really? There’s no mention of any carbide strip on the blade on the website. It just says M42 HSS.

**LINK**

Neil Wyatt08/12/2017 21:23:38
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Moderator
11870 forum posts
542 photos
64 articles
Posted by ega on 07/12/2017 10:28:23:
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 06/12/2017 11:11:33:
Posted by ega on 06/12/2017 10:15:09:
Posted by Hopper on 05/12/2017 23:08:34:

Mate of mine bought a T shaped parting tool blade and holder from Eccentric. It has a strip of carbide along the top of the T. He uses it for putting circlip grooves in the outside diameter of hardened steel bearing races about 50mm diamter -- in a mini lathe. Can't complain about that for performance.

Hopper:

I couldn't find this interesting item on the EE website.

www.eccentricengineering.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=31&Itemid=45

Neil Wyatt:

Thanks for the link which, however, takes me to a page where the only reference to "carbide" is to indexable carbide tipped tools.

Strange... that link takes me straight to the front or rear parting tool

If the tool isn't fifth down on the menu to the left, then you need to clear your cache and reload the site.

Neil

Michael Gilligan08/12/2017 21:35:10
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10328 forum posts
446 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 08/12/2017 21:23:38:

Strange... that link takes me straight to the front or rear parting tool

.

... but where is there any reference to the blade having a carbide 'top' to the T

?

MichaelG.

not done it yet08/12/2017 22:12:03
1264 forum posts
9 photos

Really? There’s no mention of any carbide strip on the blade on the website. It just says M42 HSS.

Don't ask me. I only quoted from Hopper's post. He is the one to ask!

Perhaps you are not looking in the right place? You had better ask Hopper, or even his mate.

 

 

 

Edited By not done it yet on 08/12/2017 22:13:21

Fowlers Fury08/12/2017 22:17:54
avatar
128 forum posts
28 photos

> Chris T anhd Jon,

Many thanks for your comments.
I have used Iscar tips for general turning and found they performed well so I'll certainly try a couple for the p/o holder and hopefully start using it again.

"Looks rather rounded even though unused."
My thinking too & why I began to sharpen them on a diamand wheel, after which they cut much better. Here's that same new tip from the side:-
1_tip side  x10.jpg

Eccentric Engineer10/12/2017 09:57:46
avatar
18 forum posts

Hi All

Thought I'd just clear up the confusion with the carbide tipped "T" type blades question.

I used to sell a 1mm and a 1.6mm wide blade with a brazed on carbide strip about 16mm long but I didn't sell many as they were quite expensive so I discontinued them a while back.

If anyone really needs one they can still be purchased through Somma Tooling in the US but I've just had a look at their website and a 1/1/6" tipped blade is now US$44.50 + postage so fairly pricey.

They also make solid carbide ones if you want to fork out US$83.50. You wouldn't want to snap it on the first job crying

Cheers

Gary

Eccentric Engineering

ega10/12/2017 10:47:04
714 forum posts
80 photos

Thanks for clearing that up, Gary.

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