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Best quality M2 taps

Strongest and least likely to break.

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Brian John16/07/2017 02:08:16
1433 forum posts
579 photos

What brands of M2 taps do members use ? I never have any trouble with M3 or larger taps but I have had a few M2 taps break. Brass and cast iron are usually okay but steels often cause problems. I use plenty of Tap Magic and I go very slowly, about 1/8 turn at a time....back and forward.....but I still sometimes get a broken tap.

Thor16/07/2017 06:33:42
821 forum posts
20 photos

Hi Brian,

I have a few non branded serial taps that work well, but not as well as my Dormer taps. Have you tried using 1.7mm tapping drills in steel?

Thor

richard 216/07/2017 07:18:20
92 forum posts

Morning Brian

Have just tapped a number of M2 holes - PRESTO taps from Cutwell.

Excellent taps and superb service.

No relation - just a very satisfied customer.

Richard 2.

JasonB16/07/2017 08:08:40
avatar
Moderator
11610 forum posts
1032 photos

Although I have dormneones in teh larger sizes they get a bit spendy as the size reduces so I use Volkel ones M2.5 and below, usually get them from Rotagrip via their e-bay shop

Neil Lickfold16/07/2017 08:15:10
333 forum posts
44 photos

Using a 1.7mm drill does help a lot to make the taps last longer. Especially when tapping steel.

Neil

speelwerk16/07/2017 08:57:22
295 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by JasonB on 16/07/2017 08:08:40:

Although I have dormneones in teh larger sizes they get a bit spendy as the size reduces so I use Volkel ones M2.5 and below, usually get them from Rotagrip via their e-bay shop

Small size good quality taps are indeed spendy, the time you bougth them in the hardware store around the corner is long gone. I returned the 1.4mm ones from Bergeon since 110 euro ex. VAT was a shock. Niko.

Chris Evans 616/07/2017 09:11:20
1000 forum posts

Plus 1 for Volkel and Rotagrip.

Brian John16/07/2017 09:43:24
1433 forum posts
579 photos

Yes, I always go up to 1.7mm when tapping into steels.

Neil Lickfold16/07/2017 10:16:17
333 forum posts
44 photos

I have found on small stuff the tapping compound makes a difference. I like the old Tap magic and the other that is good is Relton Rapid tap fluid.

Neil

Gary Wooding16/07/2017 11:37:46
392 forum posts
78 photos

I created THIS PDF some years ago. It presents a set of tables comprising: Metric/Inch conversions, and tap/drill sizes of Metric, Imperial, B.A., and BSP threads. The tapping sizes are calculated to give a 65% thread engagement for sizes up to about 3/8", and 70-75% thereafter, as per Tubal Cain's Model Engineer's Handbook. The sizes are not copied from the book (which contains at least one error) but are calculated from scratch.

The PDF consists of 2 pages that I've printed on both sides of a single sheet and laminated to make a useful workshop crib sheet. It's my "goto" source of information for threading data.

Brian John16/07/2017 14:01:17
1433 forum posts
579 photos

The charts I have used in the past give the tap drill as 1.6mm. That PDF gives the tap drill for 2 x 0.4 as 1.7mm. So should I still be ''going up a size'' to 1.8mm when tapping into steel or use 1.7mm for all metals including brass ?

 

Edited By Brian John on 16/07/2017 14:02:34

Gary Wooding16/07/2017 14:45:24
392 forum posts
78 photos
Posted by Brian John on 16/07/2017 14:01:17:

The charts I have used in the past give the tap drill as 1.6mm. That PDF gives the tap drill for 2 x 0.4 as 1.7mm. So should I still be ''going up a size'' to 1.8mm when tapping into steel or use 1.7mm for all metals including brass ?

No, the calculation for M2/0.4 is for a 65% thread engagement. I've used it in steel many times.

SillyOldDuffer16/07/2017 14:56:30
2172 forum posts
468 photos
Posted by Gary Wooding on 16/07/2017 11:37:46:

I created THIS PDF some years ago.

....

Thanks Gary; copy taken!

Cheers,

Dave

KWIL16/07/2017 15:03:16
2800 forum posts
50 photos

I think it would be helpful IF when you are talking about taps you state whether you are using straight or spiral fluted taps.

There is no doubt that spiral fluted taps clear the chip better than straight, especially as you get smaller diameter.

Brian John17/07/2017 05:53:49
1433 forum posts
579 photos

Are spiral fluted M2 taps likely to be any stronger than straight fluted M2 taps ? There can't be much difference.

Why do we make straight fluted taps if spiral taps clear the chip better ?

Edited By Brian John on 17/07/2017 05:56:27

roy entwistle17/07/2017 09:03:57
722 forum posts

Why do we make straight fluted taps if spiral taps clear the chip better ?

Obviously cheaper to produce

Roy

Ian S C17/07/2017 11:29:05
avatar
6460 forum posts
216 photos

Hi Brian, you'll likely find the ones most available will be Australian made Sutton brand, they seem to be fairly good. For brass, copper, aluminium, and any ductile metal the strongest taps are the Threadflo type of fluteless taps.

Ian S C

KWIL17/07/2017 11:37:08
2800 forum posts
50 photos

Spiral flute taps flow the cut material forwards in the case of spiral point and backwards in the case of the spiral flute, practically none stays fixed in the flute like a straight flute, hence less jams and breaks.

SillyOldDuffer17/07/2017 12:32:31
2172 forum posts
468 photos
Posted by Brian John on 16/07/2017 02:08:16:

...

I go very slowly, about 1/8 turn at a time....back and forward.....but I still sometimes get a broken tap.

I too break small taps. Being weedy little things they're vulnerable to jamming due to swarf, not being straight in the hole, and going blunt. My breakage rate dropped after:

  1. Using a tap stand to keep the tap at right angles to the hole
  2. Taking the tap out completely every few turns (or as soon as it resists) and removing swarf from the flutes and hole. I find Steel and Aluminium swarf more troublesome than Brass.
  3. In steel, over-sizing the hole (unless strength matters)
  4. Dumping taps as soon as they show any sign of bluntness.

Depending on how it feels, I usually make more than 1/8 turn reversals, perhaps up to a full turn. I look for the point where I get a tiny snick on reversing the tap. Not sure if that's right but it works for me.

Dave

KWIL17/07/2017 15:39:32
2800 forum posts
50 photos

The tiny snick is the large "chip" being broken away from the parent material

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