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Is It Hard To Remove The Mill Column?

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Mark Eisen17/02/2017 10:29:06
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44 forum posts
19 photos

After the success in removing the the push button oiler on my lathe, I thought I would replace the one on the base of my mill, about the centre of the column.

This one never had a ball in it from new, I kept it covered with a small block of wood.

I managed to get it out but I am unable to press the new one in as it is under a 45° recess on the column.

Would it be feasible to undo the bolts attaching the column and move it back a couple of cm , press it in and reassemble it?

It part No 107 in the parts diagram in the following link.

Can take a pic tomorrow if needed.

Edited By Mark Eisen on 17/02/2017 10:30:59

Edited By Mark Eisen on 17/02/2017 10:32:05

Edited By Mark Eisen on 17/02/2017 10:39:14

Clive Foster17/02/2017 11:06:15
864 forum posts
19 photos

Shouldn't be too difficult provided you can arrange overhead support to take the weight. When I did my similar one a roof truss cross beam was sufficiently close to simply run a rope round the head and wind the assembly off using the elevating screw. Dowels will probably be tight so you need a decently straight lift.

The sheet metalwork and switchgear looks the bigger pain as that will all have to come off and be put safely out of the way. Fairly straightforward but time consuming.

As you have dowels as well as bolts at the bottom of the head don't even think about trying to shift things without support. Theoretically it could be levered off but you are almost certain to bend a dowel. Even if you do get it off you will run out of hands to support and shift the removed column. Did similar with a simple bolt down column, lighter and a balanced load. Things still got a bit hairy once the bolts were out and I went for the move. Admittedly mostly due to poor planning in that case.

If overhead support isn't possible you might be able to mange by fitting a strong pillar to the table. Gripping it with a collet and again using the elevating screw to help move the column. Being an inflexible set-up you must to be very careful to ensure it comes up straight and the column will be in the way. Swing round and stand on the table I guess. Wood blocks et al for support so it can't go anywhere.

Clive.

Michael Gilligan17/02/2017 11:10:19
9502 forum posts
408 photos

Mark,

Removing the column should be easy enough

The difficult part it getting it set right when you reassemble it.

... I recommend a review of forum threads related to "tramming" before you decide.

MichaelG.

.

of course, if it's out of alignment already ... you have little to lose.

Tony Pratt 117/02/2017 11:16:50
620 forum posts
2 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 17/02/2017 11:10:19:

Mark,

Removing the column should be easy enough

The difficult part it getting it set right when you reassemble it.

... I recommend a review of forum threads related to "tramming" before you decide.

MichaelG.

.

of course, if it's out of alignment already ... you have little to lose.

In theory if no debris is allowed to get between column & base the alignments will be exactly the same?

Tony

Michael Gilligan17/02/2017 11:35:32
9502 forum posts
408 photos

Posted by Tony Pratt 1 on 17/02/2017 11:16:50:

In theory if no debris is allowed to get between column & base the alignments will be exactly the same?

Tony

.

In theory, Tony ... Yes

In practice, a lot depends on the build-quality.

MichaelG.

mechman4817/02/2017 11:38:06
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1430 forum posts
284 photos

FWIW... Is it at all feasible to lever/press the oiler in using the column as a fulcrum point, if there is enough room to get a lever of some description in + an ally / brass pad to protect the oiler... if you got the old oiler out there must be some manoeuvring room...? thinking

George.

JasonB17/02/2017 12:39:23
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Moderator
10441 forum posts
947 photos

Just undo the 4 bolts, I did it to my X3 which has the same base & column to make it lighter to lift onto the bench

There are also dowel pins to keep it lined up so should go back OK

Protect the table with a block of wood and you can wind the spindle down onto the table to take the weight if needed

No need to remove any sheet metal work or electrics

Edited By JasonB on 17/02/2017 12:40:56

Edited By JasonB on 17/02/2017 12:41:44

JasonB17/02/2017 13:32:45
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Moderator
10441 forum posts
947 photos

Before you go through removing the column is is worth thinking about whether to put the oiler back in.

For the same reason you can't easily press it into the hole you also can't get a good seal with an oil can spout. May be easier to put a bit of gaffer tape over the hole and replace that each time you oil up which will only be a couple of times a year.

Oram Gemok20/02/2017 14:28:39
1 forum posts

It's quite easy if you will manage with weight and how well it is done, materials and so on...

Howard Lewis21/02/2017 16:57:01
646 forum posts

If you do lift the column, check if there are any shims between it and the base. AND note their position.

And when everything is back together tram it A change in torque applied to the individual fastenings can affect the alignment, even if they are metal to metal.

While its apart, can you find a more accessible location for the oiler, and then blank off the one that is causing the grief?

In fact, is it feasible to fit the new oiler in another location, and plug the original point, without moving the column at all?

Howard

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