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What AMP power supply for windscreen wiper motor

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petro1head07/01/2017 17:40:50
192 forum posts
27 photos

Looking to buy a power unit for my X axis power feed project. However I have no idea what current draw the wiper motor uses and need an idea before buying a power supply

Edited By petro1head on 07/01/2017 17:41:15

not done it yet07/01/2017 17:42:48
470 forum posts

Voltage might be important! 12 or 24V?

petro1head07/01/2017 18:00:33
192 forum posts
27 photos

Opps, yes indeed. 12V

richardandtracy07/01/2017 18:07:52
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308 forum posts

10 amps seems a suitable Max.

Do you have an old computer? The PSU can usually do 10A at 12 V. Needs a few extra components to make it work. Currently I'm converting one to power my 12V electric screwdriver now the battery has died. Needed parts cost £1.71 from Maplins. It's worth doing a search on how to do it - there's a lot of info on the web.

Regards

Richard.

petro1head07/01/2017 18:18:38
192 forum posts
27 photos

So something like this would do it? - **LINK**

richardandtracy07/01/2017 18:29:01
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308 forum posts

I'd be very surprised if it draws much more than 120W, so yes, but would suggest waiting for comments from others before splashing any cash on it.

Regards

Richard.

petro1head07/01/2017 18:31:03
192 forum posts
27 photos

I think my main concern is the initial current draw at switch on

Martin Connelly07/01/2017 18:54:36
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384 forum posts
39 photos

If you keep the battery in the system you can use a lower current power supply. Since you do not run the feed continuously the power supply will top up the battery when the power feed is off. With this in mind a cheap 12v battery charger may suit your needs. If you are not able to use the battery shown then a smaller lead acid battery could be used. 

Martin

Edited By Martin Connelly on 07/01/2017 18:56:38

petro1head07/01/2017 19:19:24
192 forum posts
27 photos

Did a check and on initial start on the draw is just over 10A settling to a steady 6.5A

not done it yet07/01/2017 19:39:53
470 forum posts

There might also be an electric window winder that could be considered (to replace the windscreen wiper motor) - somewhat more powerful. Worth considering before buying an under-powered wiper motor system?

Bill Wood 207/01/2017 19:59:31
95 forum posts
6 photos

I have also seen electric motors used to raise/lower car seats mentioned as being useful for this purpose.

petro1head07/01/2017 19:59:32
192 forum posts
27 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 07/01/2017 19:39:53:

There might also be an electric window winder that could be considered (to replace the windscreen wiper motor) - somewhat more powerful. Worth considering before buying an under-powered wiper motor system?

 

 

 

Uhum **LINK**

Edited By petro1head on 07/01/2017 20:00:32

Edited By petro1head on 07/01/2017 20:03:51

John Haine07/01/2017 20:06:08
1197 forum posts
84 photos

You could arrange the speed control to give a soft start to reduce the switch on current. I have a feeling that w/wiper motors are much over-specified for this task actually and you could use a much smaller motor, given that there could be quite a step down ratio to the leadscrew. Look at Mike Cox' version on his website.

petro1head07/01/2017 20:13:34
192 forum posts
27 photos

Just Posted by John Haine on 07/01/2017 20:06:08:

You could arrange the speed control to give a soft start to reduce the switch on current. I have a feeling that w/wiper motors are much over-specified for this task actually and you could use a much smaller motor, given that there could be quite a step down ratio to the leadscrew. Look at Mike Cox' version on his website.

Well I have already gone with a wiper motor. See my link above

John Baron07/01/2017 20:30:13
18 forum posts
1 photos

I built a window screen wiper motor table drive quite some time ago. I got mine from the local scrapyard for the cost of taking it off the scrap car it was attached to. Actually I got two, one left hand drive and one right hand drive. Neither draw more than 2.5 amps at 12 volts on full load. Mine normally takes about 2 amps and runs at around 8 volts. I actually run it from an old variable voltage lab PSU, which has built in voltage and current meters. I used a tumbler gear mechanism to provide both reversing and disconnection so that the right handwheel can be manually turned.

For a build log.

http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/showthread.php?t=23130

Edited By John Baron on 07/01/2017 20:36:16

Edited By John Baron on 07/01/2017 20:36:42

Ian Phillips07/01/2017 20:50:31
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1561 forum posts
64 photos
Posted by petro1head on 07/01/2017 19:19:24:

Did a check and on initial start on the draw is just over 10A settling to a steady 6.5A

Out of interest, how did you measure the peak current, was it with an oscilloscope?

If you are quick enough or brave enough, you could measure the short circuit current with an ordinary digital or analogue meter with the motor stalled. I would not be surprised it it was more than 20A.

I used car wiper motors on several projects (20 or more years ago) and found that some modifications became essential. Most wiper motor only rotate in one direction and the gearing and bearing arrangements are optimised for that direction. One I used had now provision for the motor spindle (with its integral worm gear) to handle the thrust in the reverse direction. I have also come across the tooth form on the worm and pinion being assymetrical (like a buttress thread) so the gearing efficiency is significantly different in the two directions.

I have no knowledge of the internal design of the wiper motor you have used and its more than possible that the potential problems dont exist in yours.

One other point is that the method of obtaining the two speeds is often by using a third carbon brush positioned so that it uses fewer of the armature windings. Less copper means less resistance so the motor current is much higher resulting in the increased speed. The motor efficiency suffers at the higher speed but the vehicle electrics can cope with it.

Finding a power supply with a PWM output with a high enough current rating to cope with a relatively high current motor might not be easy

My choice would be to use the slow speed brush connection but use a higher than 12V supply (say 15 or 18V)

Ian P

petro1head07/01/2017 21:02:19
192 forum posts
27 photos

I don't have access to an oscilloscope. I used a clamp meter attached to my multimeter.

I will be using a 40A rated PWM.

For the number of times I use the mill if the motor lasts a year and then has to be replaced that's not a problem. They are cheap enough.

Ian S C08/01/2017 10:58:14
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5847 forum posts
202 photos

I use an old Lucas wiper motor for the power feed on my mill, I extended the shaft through the worm wheel to take a sprocket, ten tooth to motor, 20 tooth to mill, joined with a bit of bike chain that is loose enough to be lifted off for manual feed. The motor works ok in both directions, and I run it on 18volts. I have three switched speeds using resistors. It's been going some thing like 20 years, and shows no sign of giving up. These motors will take up to 100% over voltage.

Ian S C

Garth08/01/2017 13:18:24
17 forum posts

One should take care in reversing windscreen wiper motors, they are designed to run in one direction only in most cases. Brush position can give excessive arcing with reverse rotation

Door window motors would be more suitable.

Due to high gearing of these motors 10 Amp power supply would be more than enough.

Ian S C09/01/2017 08:54:16
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5847 forum posts
202 photos

The old (1960/70) Lucas motors seem quite happy in either direction, these ones also have wound stators instead of the modern ones with permanent magnets. Another motor that I run is from a garage door opener, it's a 36 volt type, it is the motor on the hoist above my lathe.

Ian S Cdsc00229 (640x427).jpg

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