By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by allandale

Name plates

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
John Lintorn27/12/2016 23:18:46
avatar
56 forum posts
54 photos
Has anyone any idea the best way to go about making a pair of name plates for my 5" Tich? I want to name it Chuggabug but a company online wanted 220 for a pair of plates 1" x 3" with 1/16" raised lettering. I think that is extortionate. What are the thoughts of you guys?
Peter Krogh27/12/2016 23:23:50
avatar
199 forum posts
20 photos

Here's one:

http://www.gasenginemagazine.com/gas-engines/diy-brass-nameplates

Pete

pgk pgk27/12/2016 23:49:24
958 forum posts
278 photos

Richard S2 described how he made some lower down this thread;

**LINK**

julian atkins28/12/2016 00:08:33
avatar
1138 forum posts
351 photos

Hi John,

You ought to be able to make your own for less than £20. There was a time when you could pop into the local pharmascist and buy ferric chloride solution. Now you can buy it on ebay very cheaply.

John Baguley (Baggo) has one of the best modern descriptions of how to make them on his excellent website.

Cheers,

Julian

Roger Head28/12/2016 01:07:28
209 forum posts
7 photos

My only experience with chemical etching is making pcbs for electronics (I've made hundreds over the years), so it's all shallow etching. To obtain 1/16" deep etching of acceptable quality (clean steep edges on your lettering, lack of undercut, etc) might not exactly be a doddle in a 'kitchen-table' type of setup.

I'd suggest a reasonable bit of googling first, and enough material for lots of testing. I'll be happy to be proved wrong.

Just my two cents...

Roger

Brian Hutchings28/12/2016 07:11:58
avatar
505 forum posts
49 photos

Sounds like you need someone with a 3D printer to make a pattern followed by a decent foundry.

I once had some similar sized nameplates made using a perspex pattern from Eyre & Baxter in Sheffield and the services of a brass founders in Nottinghamshire.

I supplied Eyre & Baxter with a transparency with a black image showing the raised portions and I think an article was published in ME many years ago.

JasonB28/12/2016 07:40:33
avatar
Moderator
11610 forum posts
1032 photos

Piercing saw and some solder is another option. Print out your wording, stick it to a bit of 16swg brass and cut out the letters then solder to some 3/16" brass that hass been milled out to 1/8" leaving a border around the outside.

John Haine28/12/2016 07:42:54
1559 forum posts
90 photos

Ought to be possible to reverse engrave from say 1/8" brass plate by CNC. Do you have a drawing?

Michael Gilligan28/12/2016 07:52:01
10219 forum posts
443 photos
Posted by John Lintorn on 27/12/2016 23:18:46:
Has anyone any idea the best way to go about making a pair of name plates for my 5" Tich? I want to name it Chuggabug but a company online wanted �220 for a pair of plates 1" x 3" with 1/16" raised lettering. I think that is extortionate. What are the thoughts of you guys?

..

Thoughts:

The 'National Living Wage' is currently set at £7.20 per hour, and a 'Craftsman' might earn [say] five times that.

A company will have significant overheads on top of that; and should also expect to make some profit.

So ... How long would it take you to make them ?

£220 sounds uncomfortably high when you're buying, but may be more reasonable than you think.

MichaelG.

John Haine28/12/2016 08:11:47
1559 forum posts
90 photos

John, I've sent you a PM.

pgk pgk28/12/2016 08:23:33
958 forum posts
278 photos

Cold cast bronze might be another way to go about it... either chasing out a mould or the extra step of carving a wax positive to make a mould from?

Chris Evans 628/12/2016 08:43:40
1000 forum posts

I have sold my Taylor Hobson pantograph but someone on here may have one. Old hat now with so much CNC capacity around. This is an ideal hobby CNC mill job, you may get an offer of help from someone close.

Clive Hartland28/12/2016 10:34:06
avatar
2176 forum posts
38 photos

Pantograph engraver, set up time about 30 minutes, engraving and cut out time at least 2.5 hours. £30 an hour so cost about £90 plus metal.

Obviously CNC has overtaken the Pantograph set up and I think that it would cost just about the same. You set it up and walk away till it's done.

£220 sounds as if they do not want to do it, I was offered a job with masses of small type to do but declined by doubling the hourly rate. It was a brass plate with his life history on it. I asked an Alarm Company to replace two batteries on a wall mounted alarm, cost £147, no thank you, did it myself at about £10 including battery.

Clive

mick H28/12/2016 10:57:45
581 forum posts
12 photos

Just a thought John, I notice that Reeves sell brass stamped numbers and letters at between 30p and £3 each. These could easily be soldered to a home made nameplate.

Mick

John Alexander Stewart28/12/2016 11:26:46
634 forum posts
49 photos

Hi John;

I CNC cut some plates for a friends' locomotive. I did this by feeding in a jpg file into LinuxCNC, which can read jpg files. I used engraving cutters, and took it slowly. It worked very well. In the photo attached, the plates required the name/surround on "flat brass" for fitting on the end of bogie bolsters.

JohnS.

simplex truck parts

John Stevenson28/12/2016 12:50:37
avatar
Moderator
5068 forum posts
3 photos

No one has mentioned finishing.

The enamel used on professional plates is very expensive but works and lasts far better than paint which is what most home brewed plates use.

The plates that John Alexander has done above are very nice but hours away from being finished.

Possibly as much time again ?

mark smith 2028/12/2016 14:29:01
554 forum posts
294 photos
Posted by Roger Head on 28/12/2016 01:07:28:

My only experience with chemical etching is making pcbs for electronics (I've made hundreds over the years), so it's all shallow etching. To obtain 1/16" deep etching of acceptable quality (clean steep edges on your lettering, lack of undercut, etc) might not exactly be a doddle in a 'kitchen-table' type of setup.

I'd suggest a reasonable bit of googling first, and enough material for lots of testing. I'll be happy to be proved wrong.

Just my two cents...

Roger

I did this which was my first attempt and turned out good enough to use,using a cheap samsung b/w laser printer , some mylar drafting film ,an iron and some ferric chloride. It is impossible to get very deep but was good enough for the south bend gearbox plate.p1250952.jpg

p1250953.jpg

p1250978.jpg

p1260023.jpg

John Lintorn28/12/2016 20:50:12
avatar
56 forum posts
54 photos
I have messaged you back John Haine!
I had a look at the letters on A Jack reeves but they don't look like raised letters to me Mick H.
The plates that John Alexander have made look very nice!
I will have a look into this photo etching lark...
Roger Head28/12/2016 23:50:16
209 forum posts
7 photos

Hi Mark, that plate looks really good yes. As you say, getting any real depth of etching consistently is very difficult, but if a shallow etch is acceptable, then getting sharp, high-resolution linework is quite straightforward.

I am particularly interested in the red and black infill that you have achieved - could you please give us some details on your method and materials for achieving that, and also some close-ups of the finished plate.

My 13 x 40 has no plate for the threading dial, only a table (in a poorly photo-copied manual) that looks like it was scratched out by a one-legged chicken clutching a blunt pencil! That page in the manual is now deteriorating through constant reference, so I've been 'thinking about doing something' (i.e. procrastinating) for a while.

Roger

John Alexander Stewart29/12/2016 01:33:52
634 forum posts
49 photos

Posted by John Stevenson on 28/12/2016 12:50:37:The plates that John Alexander has done above are very nice but hours away from being finished.

Possibly as much time again ?

As they are to represent cast letters on the end of a cast steel truck (bogie) bolster, you are absolutely right - there is a lot of work left for the recipient. Mind you, he's got it finished, tender is wheeled, just needs leaf springs and a few more bits and pieces (backup headlight, etc) and this "Canadian" tender is complete.

I have seen a few CNC nameplates done by others "over here" that are very good.

If you just want name plates, and you realize life is short, and you are not interested in the process by itself maybe as has been mentioned - just purchase the things!

JohnS.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Email News - Join our newsletter

Love Model Engineering? Sign up to our emails for the latest news and special offers!

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Ausee.com.au
Expo Tools July 14
SPG Tools October Seventeen
Shapiro
Merdienne London Show 2018
Reeves 2000
Eccentric Engineering
Warco
PaulTheCad
emcomachinetools
Allendale Electronics
ChesterUK
TRANSWAVE Converters
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest

Visit the Model Engineer
Exhibition website

Model Engineer Exhibition