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First Model complete - where next?

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Stuart Bridger01/07/2016 21:31:55
142 forum posts
4 photos

I have finally completed my first model, a humble Stuart 10V. While not up to competition standard, I think I have done a pretty decent job. It runs nicely on air and the finish came up well. The wife has even allowed it to take pride of pIace on the mantelpiece. I have learned and re-learned a lot during this first foray into model engineering. It wasn't without challenges and there were a few components scrapped along the way.

The big question is what to tackle next? I think I would like to stick to stationary steam, but would like something that will challenge me further. Any suggestions on suitable kits or even plans from scratch for a next project? I have a reasonable capacity with a Chipmaster and a Warco VMC, so could tackle something with a larger flywheel.

Incidentlayy the base was cut from a low cost beech chopping board from a supermarket finished witha gunstock oil.

img_5079_ed.jpg

roy entwistle01/07/2016 22:01:13
570 forum posts

Very nice but can I ask why did you use slotted round head screws instead of screws from underneath with nuts on top to fasten it to the base ?

Roy

Edited By roy entwistle on 01/07/2016 22:02:02

Martin Cottrell01/07/2016 22:03:06
282 forum posts
18 photos

That looks an extremely well executed first attempt Stuart! As for your next engine, how about staying with ST and trying one of their larger engines, perhaps a Victoria, a James Combes engine or perhaps one of their beam engines?

Regards Martin.

Stuart Bridger01/07/2016 22:06:59
142 forum posts
4 photos
Posted by roy entwistle on 01/07/2016 22:01:13:

Very nice but can I ask why did you use slotted round head screws instead of screws from underneath with nuts on top to fasten it to the base ?

Roy

Edited By roy entwistle on 01/07/2016 22:02:02

Roy, to be honest, it was lack of plain steel nuts and making use of what I had to hand.

Stuart Bridger01/07/2016 22:09:09
142 forum posts
4 photos
Posted by Martin Cottrell on 01/07/2016 22:03:06:

That looks an extremely well executed first attempt Stuart! As for your next engine, how about staying with ST and trying one of their larger engines, perhaps a Victoria, a James Combes engine or perhaps one of their beam engines?

Regards Martin.

Thanks Martin, I had been looking at The James Coombes

NJH01/07/2016 22:26:38
avatar
2153 forum posts
136 photos

There are a couple of build threads of the James Coombes on this forum. (Just search for James Coombes) If you want just a bit bigger than the 10 you could try the No 7 .

Many years ago I built the "Real" which uses the same sized bits as the James Coombs" It sits happily on my desk!

I always liked Stuart kits and the Victoria is certainly a nice model .

Let us know how you decide!

Regards

Norman

Edited By NJH on 01/07/2016 22:34:48

Peter Krogh02/07/2016 03:27:45
avatar
161 forum posts

Very good looking engine. Clean and sweet!

Pete

Paul Lousick02/07/2016 08:59:54
637 forum posts
356 photos

Stuart, A nice looking engine.

For the next project, how about a small boiler to go with it so it can be powered by steam.

Paul

Ian S C02/07/2016 10:59:56
avatar
5917 forum posts
202 photos

The ST S9 mill engine is a nice model, the governor is an interesting feature, I don't know if the current batch have a feed pump for a boiler, the older ones did. Ian S C

Nick_G02/07/2016 11:09:33
avatar
1323 forum posts
509 photos
Posted by Martin Cottrell on 01/07/2016 22:03:06:

perhaps a Victoria, a James Combes engine or perhaps one of their beam engines?

Regards Martin.

.

I found the James Coombes an interesting engine to construct. Also nice to look at (I think) with lots going on when running.

It's a reasonable size and there are many different machining type processes required. Reasonably small parts for the timing links to larger components. Taper turning to bar end rounding. It can be made as simple or as ornate as the builder would like.

The most difficult part (yet the most satisfying) was the 'Y' shaped conrod. It's important that it's true and not twisted for the engine to run properly and also looks cosmetically sweet as it's the main visual part of the engine.

I also did a build thread :- **LINK**

Regards, Nick

Stuart Bridger02/07/2016 11:27:31
142 forum posts
4 photos
Posted by Nick_G on 02/07/2016 11:09:33:
Posted by Martin Cottrell on 01/07/2016 22:03:06:

perhaps a Victoria, a James Combes engine or perhaps one of their beam engines?

Regards Martin.

.

I found the James Coombes an interesting engine to construct. Also nice to look at (I think) with lots going on when running.

It's a reasonable size and there are many different machining type processes required. Reasonably small parts for the timing links to larger components. Taper turning to bar end rounding. It can be made as simple or as ornate as the builder would like.

The most difficult part (yet the most satisfying) was the 'Y' shaped conrod. It's important that it's true and not twisted for the engine to run properly and also looks cosmetically sweet as it's the main visual part of the engine.

I also did a build thread :- **LINK**

Regards, Nick

Thanks Nick, I watched your video of the completed model a couple of hours ago. Nice work! James Coombe is looking a very attractive proposition.

JasonB02/07/2016 15:06:39
avatar
Moderator
9974 forum posts
920 photos

A good first engine.

As well as the sual Stuart offering there are one or two engines from Reeves that are not too tricky as a second engine, Bruce engineering have a good range of Anthony Mount's designs but they can be quite small on some of teh parts so probably better as a third/forth subject. TS over in Germany have some similar designs to Stuart as well as a few other interesting subject so worth thinking about too.

Metatsteam102/07/2016 21:07:03
15 forum posts
1 photos

Hi Suart

I would be very pleased with a first attempt that looked as good as that. Can I recommend a website you may find useful when looking for a new project:- www.John-Tom.com. All models can be built with stock materials even the flywheel, although a stuart No10 flywheel improves all the models. I have built the version of STs Jamies Coombs from this site and also a version to the Stuart real engine but I doubled the size which created as very impressive model. Good luck with future builds.

Mat

mechman4803/07/2016 19:11:33
avatar
1267 forum posts
226 photos

Hi Stuart

Nice job on your S10V. I'm on my way to completing the S10V as you have; I have the S50 in waiting, followed by the Stuart Progress so with the amount of time I get in my man cave I have enough to see the rest of this year out, plus I have numerous plans in my library to see me out so not worried on that score.

George.

Neil Wyatt03/07/2016 19:28:53
avatar
Moderator
8843 forum posts
466 photos
56 articles

Very pretty Stuart, nice base too.

Neil

JasonB18/12/2016 07:36:24
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Moderator
9974 forum posts
920 photos

Last post moved to this new thread

Speedy Builder518/12/2016 09:18:02
1030 forum posts
70 photos

How about a nice vertical boiler - different skills and tools but would complete the engine, after that, a dynamo or small circular saw ??
BobH

Michael-w18/12/2016 10:38:12
avatar
1326 forum posts
27 photos

You could try Tubal Cain's simple steam engine books, it's all old measurement but coming from the age of metric myself I can make do.

Michael W

mechman4818/12/2016 12:21:59
avatar
1267 forum posts
226 photos


Like you I have completed my S10V & now on with the 'progress' horizontal kit. ON my S10V I have replaced the valve chest cover with a Perspex sheet instead of using the cast cover, just so people can see the valve system operating...

​Hmm I can't seem to resize pic now, before I could click on pic , it would turn blue and with edit points on the edges, I could then pick up one of the edit points & resize to a more convenient size, anyone know what's happened? It seem that this forums formatting seems to change willy nilly... the original pic was resized to 600 x 480 by Fastone resizer & have never had bother with any of my other pics?


s10v base.jpg

​Hmm seem to have got it sorted... have to right click pic & go through 'edit image' & change height & width in drop down box... Ahhh modern technology, does what IT wants to & not what YOU want it to, when everything worked fine before.

Progress so far on my next model... 'Progress' horizontal... with some de-flashing & initial machining done...

s10 oh basic parts.jpg

​A chilled iron section of the base...

s10 oh chilled sectioned.jpg

​machining the recess on the cylinder port face...

stuart oh cyl.machining (2).jpg

​Partial assembly to check fit & operation...

s10 oh partial assembly (1).jpg

There are more pics in my album... Stuart OH...

George.


 

Edited By mechman48 on 18/12/2016 12:25:07

Edited By mechman48 on 18/12/2016 12:38:24

mechman4818/12/2016 20:47:37
avatar
1267 forum posts
226 photos

Got the pic issue sorted ...I think. as I am more or less forced to use MS 'edge' now as my browser, I tried opening up in IE & managed to open the MEW forum in IE, attempted to manipulate the pics... lo & behold I was back to the editing points on the pic, so I picked the bottom corner point & found I could shrink / enlarge pic as previously. It seems as though IE & edge have different methods of editing pics on this forum, don't ask me why, I haven't got a flippin' clue, maybe some one with more tech savvy understanding could explain...?

George.

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