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Stewart Harts Horizontal Engine build

first run

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Mike Bondarczuk27/06/2016 20:15:44
85 forum posts
6 photos

Hi all,

The video hopefully attached to this message shows the finished horizontal engine built as per the design and drawings from Stewart Hart.

It is my first non-wobbler build and there are a few cosmetic changes to the design, which are purely for personal aesthetic purposes.

I have been taking copious photographs during the build and am now in the process of compiling a build log which I hope to publish in sections quite soon.

I hope that someone enjoys the video and if has given me great personal pleasure in building this engine which will be followed by the vertical engine and finally the beam engine, thereby producing thew Trilogy from the pen of Stewart Hart.

If anyone else is contemplating building this engine then I would whole heartedly recommend this as a good first start.

Jason, if you could help with the link that would be hugely appreciated.

Mike

Edited By JasonB on 27/06/2016 20:22:36

kevin beevers27/06/2016 20:58:26
65 forum posts
43 photos

like it think i may try this looks a nice litte engine my first was woodbeam engine i have just started another but this time if i can remember to take photos of the build.nice work.

kevin

Neil Wyatt27/06/2016 22:22:54
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9818 forum posts
477 photos
59 articles

Very good, it will look nice when it's painted.

But how did you get it to 'wobble' like rubber? The video was making me seasick!

Neil

Mike Bondarczuk28/06/2016 09:03:44
85 forum posts
6 photos

Neill,

The magic of a hand held digital camera running in video mode.

Unlike some on here I don't have a tripod to give a steady base, but I guess I should try for a better video when it is painted and reassembled and hopefully running again.

Mike

Ian S C29/06/2016 10:33:40
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6157 forum posts
205 photos

Mike, you'll probably find that the mounting thread for a tripod on the camera is 1/4" Whitworth, it is simple to knock up a stand of some sort. Ian S C

Mike Bondarczuk29/06/2016 11:05:50
85 forum posts
6 photos

Ian,

I have a 1/4" Whitworth tap and die set so can make a stand of sorts.

Was actually thinking of one of those flexible armed "gorilla" type stands which I could then position rather more freely.

Mike

Michael Gilligan29/06/2016 11:25:35
9532 forum posts
408 photos
Posted by Ian S C on 29/06/2016 10:33:40:

Mike, you'll probably find that the mounting thread for a tripod on the camera is 1/4" Whitworth, it is simple to knock up a stand of some sort. Ian S C

.

... or, more likely, [to my great chagrin] 1/4" 20 UNC, to a 'sloppy-fit' tolerance specification which ensures that it will remain compatible with old 1/4" Whitworth tripod screws.

[discussed at length previously, on this forum]

MichaelG.

.

Edit: Ian, you obviously know that already blush

... I've just located your post on this page.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 29/06/2016 11:41:30

JasonB29/06/2016 11:49:59
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10456 forum posts
947 photos

It's not just camera movement that is ian issue here there is a wavyness to the video which I have noticed in a few others recently, take a look at the air connection at the start of the clip and it sways from side to side, no tripod will cure that.

There is a name and reason for it as it came up teh other day on another forum but can't find the post right now

 

Edit, seems like a tripod will help, from the other site

"Although it may be the G&Ts, it's actually a phenomenon called "rolling shutter". Cell phones (and some point n shoot still/video) record video one line at a time. "Real" video cameras capture the full frame all at once. Any cell phone movement creates the rubber legs on the engine. A camera support will stop the problem.


You may continue drinking with impunity. "

And the wobbly engine video in question, nice little engine.

Edited By JasonB on 29/06/2016 12:03:51

Roderick Jenkins29/06/2016 12:50:29
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1319 forum posts
304 photos

It's not just the camera that needs to be still. The video of my Wyvern was taken using a Nikon D90 in video mode. The camera was mounted on a tripod well isolated from the model but the Wyvern was clamped to a rather flimsy workmate clone and, being a single, is not well balanced. I think the frequency of the subject vibrations interfere with video frequency and result in a wobble. It is particularly noticeable in close-up..

 
Anyway, nice model Mike - Hope to meet you at Guildford on Saturday.
 
Rod

Edited By Roderick Jenkins on 29/06/2016 12:53:37

Neil Wyatt29/06/2016 12:55:33
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9818 forum posts
477 photos
59 articles

I suspect it's you-tube's automatic steadying software getting it wrong. It's steadying the paper sheet but not steadying all the parts of the engine correctly. If it was just a shutter issue, the edges of the paper would move as well.

After watching those two I now feel quite ill,so if MEW 244 comes out late, it's YOUR fault!

Neil

Michael Gilligan29/06/2016 13:14:41
9532 forum posts
408 photos
Posted by JasonB on 29/06/2016 11:49:59:

... it's actually a phenomenon called "rolling shutter". Cell phones (and some point n shoot still/video) record video one line at a time. "Real" video cameras capture the full frame all at once. Any cell phone movement creates the rubber legs on the engine. A camera support will stop the problem.

.

May I just expand upon that, Jason ?

Sensors [with their associated chipsets] come in two types "rolling shutter" is as you describe, and "global shutter" is the frame-capture type.

Doesn't add much to the present discussion, but might be useful if anyone wants to explore further.

MichaelG.

Michael Gilligan29/06/2016 14:04:02
9532 forum posts
408 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 29/06/2016 12:55:33:

I suspect it's you-tube's automatic steadying software getting it wrong. It's steadying the paper sheet but not steadying all the parts of the engine correctly. If it was just a shutter issue, the edges of the paper would move as well.

.

I know nothing about the automatic steadying software [something to learn-about tonight], but I think that there may be a beat frequency effect, between actual and expected frame-rate. Add in the 'rolling shutter' and you have a recipe for thise wobbly legs.

Is this more commonly seen on YouTube videos originating from PAL regions ??

MichaelG.

Roderick Jenkins29/06/2016 14:31:21
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1319 forum posts
304 photos

Well, my original video is, if anything, even wobblier than the YouTube version .

Rod

Ed Duffner29/06/2016 14:45:56
624 forum posts
50 photos

The early Nikon cameras had an issue with wobbly digital video when the camera was panned.

Very smooth running engine Mike! yes

Ed.

Edited By Ed Duffner on 29/06/2016 14:50:08

Michael Gilligan29/06/2016 15:16:47
9532 forum posts
408 photos
Posted by Roderick Jenkins on 29/06/2016 14:31:21:

Well, my original video is, if anything, even wobblier than the YouTube version .

.

Thanks for that update, Rod

I may not bother trying to understand the YouTube 'steadying software' after all.

MichaelG.

Mike Bondarczuk29/06/2016 17:03:58
85 forum posts
6 photos

Gentlemen,

Reading through the last few messages regarding the wobbling effect I do now recall that after uploading onto YouTube an option to activate the "steadying software" was accepted and in hindsight I think that this was a bad move as the original has no visible wobble, apart from the shaky human stand "me".

Mike

kevin beevers29/06/2016 18:01:19
65 forum posts
43 photos

its been pumping too much homebrew

Geoff Theasby29/06/2016 18:34:28
425 forum posts
8 photos

Mike, I notice you don't have any oil holes in the main bearings. Perhaps a 1mm drilling from the top, with a countersink to hold a drop of oil?

regards

Geoff

Geoff Theasby29/06/2016 18:34:29
425 forum posts
8 photos

Mike, I notice you don't have any oil holes in the main bearings. Perhaps a 1mm drilling from the top, with a countersink to hold a drop of oil?

regards

Geoff

Mike Bondarczuk29/06/2016 18:42:05
85 forum posts
6 photos

Geoff,

The video is of the first run and I had copiously oiled the main bearings as well as the slides and the big end bearing.

The engine is now stripped down and in the process of being prepared for painting but in the interim I had turned four oil cups, two to go on the main bearing supports and one each for the top slides.

The dimensions of the cups are such that they have a capacity of 4ml of oil and feed the bearings via 1mm diameter holes.

The idea of simple countersunk dimples to hold oil had never occurred to me and is a nice idea for the future.

The build log will show the oil cups as well as the other major components and the final video will show the finished painted engine, and I am currently busy cutting gaskets for the heads as well as the steam valve assembly.

Mike

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