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Member postings for Martin Kyte

Here is a list of all the postings Martin Kyte has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: What Did You Do Today (2017)
24/05/2017 12:04:11

Thats probably because skips are used for taking away old stuff which would have been measured in imperial so if the skips were metric stuff would not fit.

:0)

Stands to reason dunnit.

Thread: Chucks
24/05/2017 11:04:11

4 jaws grip better and can do everything a 3 Jaw can except holding hex bar (well, easily anyhow).

If you are really fussing about price stick to a Face plate and centres.

Seriously though you are probably going to buy the 'other chuck' soon after so I would say it depends on the quality of the chuck they are offering. You can probably put up with a cheaper 4 jaw than a 3 jaw. If it's a lower quality chuck go for the 4 jaw and buy the best quality 3 jaw when funds allow. That way you may not end up buying both.

regards Martin


Thread: What Did You Do Today (2017)
23/05/2017 15:22:54

Is the rope, cable laid or hawser laid?

;0)

regards Martin

23/05/2017 11:53:00

If you still don't understand how it works, tie a longish bit of rope to your gate post. Hold it so that it is off the ground but with a little slack. Now give it a single sharp horizontal twitch. You should see a wave travel down the rope to the gate post and get reflected back to you. If you know the transmission velocity and you time the input to the received reflected wave you can calculate how far down the rope the gatepost is.

Not a complete model but enough to give you the idea.

What do you say Andrew.?

regards Martin

22/05/2017 09:34:45
Posted by Muzzer on 20/05/2017 18:06:39:

Almost unforgivable I know but I had some of The Brown Stuff in the workshop today. MDF in fact. This stuff is to the woodworker what machinable wax is to the proper machinist in terms of ease of machining. Anyway, all traces of such activity including the tools for doing so have now been cleaned away.

Used this:To change this disorganised jumble of 30 and 40 taper tooling:

Murray

Do keep an eye on the tapers. I made something similar but used ply and there was definitely an issue with surface corrosion where the tapers met the wood. Never really decided if it was moisture in the wood or acids in the gluelines. My workshop does not have a condensation issue. The simple fix was to line the holes with self adheasive velour (the stuff that looks like snooker tables). You may never have a problem with MDF but it's worth keeping an eye open.

regards Martin

Thread: Is Knurling a health hazard?
19/05/2017 09:10:29
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 18/05/2017 16:52:11:
Posted by Martin Kyte on 18/05/2017 14:06:37:
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 18/05/2017 13:21:52:
Posted by Martin Kyte on 18/05/2017 09:10:39:
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 17/05/2017 16:23:23:
Posted by Martin Kyte on 17/05/2017 10:54:02:
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 15/05/2017 22:34:54:

Martin, you are completely innocent of all charges.

HaHarr, can I have a cerstificut to proove it.I'm sure I have never been innocent before.

:0)

Martin

(is rhinitis being allergic to rhinos?)

18/05/2017 14:06:37
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 18/05/2017 13:21:52:
Posted by Martin Kyte on 18/05/2017 09:10:39:
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 17/05/2017 16:23:23:
Posted by Martin Kyte on 17/05/2017 10:54:02:
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 15/05/2017 22:34:54:

...

...

...
...

The main point is that humans have lived around animals for millenia and our immune systems have adapted to cope with the pathogens and proteins encountered.

...

<Pedant Alert>

Humans are animals. That means we have immune systems that pre-date our current ape-like form right back to the origins of life. Possibly the big problem isn't that we are in trouble adapting to them, the problem is that, since the Industrial Revolution, they can't adapt to us.

Of course we are. Perhaps I should have said 'Humans have been around other animals for millenia. Particularly domesticated farm animals'.

regards Martin

18/05/2017 11:47:49

Hi Fowler, I still am.

I am an engineer not a scientist I would hast'n to add but you do pick up an awfull lot of knowledge if you take an interest. My basic point was that the immune system is far more subtle than you think as you have no doubt had first hand knowledge of in your own work. I was responding to the farm animal exposure point really which from an evolutionary perspectve should be a normal part of our continuous exposure in a way that industrial chemicals are not.(generally).

"minimising exposure is always worthwhile" cannot dissaree on a general basis, with the notable exception of vaccination.

Always welcome more informed opinion to my comments, I learn more that way.

regards Martin

18/05/2017 09:10:39
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 17/05/2017 16:23:23:
Posted by Martin Kyte on 17/05/2017 10:54:02:
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 15/05/2017 22:34:54:

I fear that we will end up living in a totally sanitised world, until one year the whole human race will die because of our under-exercised immune systems.

More than one study has found children growing up on farms suffer fewer infections.

Neil

That may be fewer allergies Niel.

Apparently the incidence of asthmas is reduced because farm kids suffer fewer viral respiratory diseases, so abit of both!

On Radio 4 today, research shows eating fermented food diversifies your gut flora more than probiotic yoghurt, with significant health benefits.

Neil

My point is that 'under exercised immune systems' does not stack up with 'fewer infections'. More infections would excercise the immune system.You need the exposure to train the system. Asthma is an allergic reaction.

You really need to habituate not sensitise. Small amounts of intermittant exposure sensitises and then you get an allergic reaction. Continuous exposure habituates and you don't. It's not as simple as you would think.

The main point is that humans have lived around animals for millenia and our immune systems have adapted to cope with the pathogens and proteins encountered. Urban living has removed most af the exposure and that causes issues.

You are probably right about farm kids having fewer infections that lead to illness but that may be because of the lifestyle, exercise, food , fresh air etc.

regards Martin

Thread: What Did You Do Today (2017)
17/05/2017 12:38:01

1. Is this merely a theoretical problem.

2. I thought the whole point of tapered plug valves is that they do not leak.

2b. If you are going to have a double taper why do you need the packing.

Only asking.

regards Martin

Thread: Is Knurling a health hazard?
17/05/2017 12:06:11

A very long tome ago, a visit was made by scientists from Porton Down to our Lab. Max Perutz (look him up) worked on Heomoglobin in the deoxygenated state so had positive pressure glove boxes fed with nitrogen to greate an anoxic atmosphere. His glove boxes therefore had the gloves sticking out of the box when not actually being used. The Porton down lot took one look at them and ran. Then trickled back sheepishly when thought took over from autopilot. Just shows the power of learned reaction.

regards Martin

17/05/2017 10:54:02
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 15/05/2017 22:34:54:

I fear that we will end up living in a totally sanitised world, until one year the whole human race will die because of our under-exercised immune systems.

More than one study has found children growing up on farms suffer fewer infections.

Neil

That may be fewer allergies Niel.

regards Martin

Thread: Bridgeport (A&S) Manual 42" Power feed conversion?
17/05/2017 10:51:07

Has anyone fitted one to a Myford VMC? If so what model or are they all adaptable.

regards Martin

Thread: What Did You Do Today (2017)
17/05/2017 10:49:04

Spotted this on the 'Canal alerts system'

We are pleased to welcome The Gardner Engine Rally to Huddlesford junction on 3rd to 4th June 2017.

**LINK**

I also noticed that they have found an unexploded Bomb next to the canal at Aston, hope it doesn't blow Niel up. He lives round there somewhere I think.

regards Martin

Thread: The diesel controversy
15/05/2017 09:10:50

I still don't understand why exhaust systems don't rust out these days?

Martin

Thread: Lathe bed marks - would you be happy to have this?
12/05/2017 14:03:46

As I was one of the ones who suggested that I would probably walk away perhaps I could explain my reasoning a little more fully. I agree with those who say that the marks on the bed would not really affect the accuracy of the machine and if I already owned the machine or had it given to me I would not be bothered overmuch.

However my take on purchasing the machine is that there are many more lathes out there and I don't necessarily have to buy this one unless I am convinced. Basically you have to have a figure in mind as to what you want to pay and try to get the best value for your money.

I think the responses have answered your initial question and the dings on th ebed will not matter. What you have to pick up on is what they say about the general condition of the lathe. You have not mentioned a price so we cannot comment from that angle.

Have you had a look around at similar lathes and could you take a mate along to take a look. Taking someone else with you helps you stay realistic and not get 'star struck' with what is in front of you.

So to return to my original statement that 'I would think twice ', that comes not from a beleif that the lathe won't operate adequately but from the notion that I could probably do better elsewere. Personally I would be looking for an unrestored lathe that looks in good condition. You can always paint it and fix smaller items.

However you are the one with the dosh so it's up to you.

regards Martin

Thread: Screwcutting Crashes -
11/05/2017 15:17:10

The disadvantages of owning an affordable lathe are far outweighed by the disadvantages of not being in possession of an unaffordable lathe. Basically, not having a lathe.

You just have to cut according to your cloth and get on with it.

regards Martin

Thread: Lathe bed marks - would you be happy to have this?
11/05/2017 11:41:03

Depends a bit where they are and how much the asking price is.

Photo 3 seems to be at the end of the tailstock end so I guess that isn't going to matter much. As you say it's obviously been scraped and not reground so it sort of depends how good the scraper did his job.

Just looking at the photos there seems to be plenty of longitudinal marks where the saddle has move up and down which appear to be deeper than the scraped marks.(photo 1) so the scaping may be just an attempt at hiding damage and removing high spots rather than properly reconditioning the bed.

Generally it probably shows that the lathe has had a hard life so you should take it as a bit of an indicator.

Personally I would walk away unless you intend to get it reground or its really cheap but see what others think first.

regards Martin

Thread: The diesel controversy
11/05/2017 08:44:53

Agreed, Roderick.

Carbon dioxide is the primary regulator of breathing. If an unconcious patient is given oxygen there is a real danger that they can stop breathing. The process with Carbon monoxide is it binds too tightly to Haemoglobin and doesn't get released in the lungs. This effectively reduces the capacity of the blood to carry oxygen to the tissues and results in death. It's quite hard to treat. Haemoglobin releases oxygen when in mose acidic areas of the body (more dissolved CO2) so targets oxygen depeted tissues and increses the efficiency of the transport process.

regards Martin

Thread: Any Bristolians out there!!!
10/05/2017 14:47:13

Slimbridge wild fowl trust, Goucester and Sharpness Canal, the Zoo, Berkeley Castle.

regards Martin

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