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Member postings for richardandtracy

Here is a list of all the postings richardandtracy has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: What Did You Do Today (2017)
19/07/2017 15:11:16
Posted by Muzzer on 19/07/2017 14:42:33:

Haha I've got one of these Bosch power chisels. Mainly intended for wood carving but comes with a carbide edged scraper which is great for cleaning flat surfaces. One of my work colleagues was good enough to assess the effectiveness of all of the chisels (not just the scraper) at removing ceramic floor tiles from concrete flooring. I won't be using it for wood carving again but perhaps it might still be up to a rusty old gate.

Murray

A previous owner of our house had had the great idea of using wall tiles on the floor of their brand new kitchen extension in the 1980's. They used a good floor tile adhesive. The glaze rapidly wore through, so they put quarry tiles on top, again with a good adhesive. We wanted something warmer to stand on that didn't smash plates when you dropped them, so I got the removal job.

I used a hammer & bolster & got the quarry tiles up easily. The wall tiles were another matter. It took 30 minutes with a hammer & chisel for a 4"x4" tile, slowly pulverizing the tile. I ended up buying an Argos special SDS hammer drill with roto-stop & a set of chisels. Took a further 4 hours to reduce the remainder of the tiles to powder. Very satisfying job, but I'd love to strangle the little so&so who thought it'd be a good idea to use wall tiles on the floor.

Regards,

Richard.

14/07/2017 10:39:28

I really do not understand why it's not referred to as ornamental milling. In most of the decorative work, the lathe is there as an indexing mechanism and a rather unusual flycutter is used. That makes it milling to me.

What you call it has no effect on the complexity & quality of the work, though.

Regards,

Richard

Thread: Er40 collet chuck query,
14/07/2017 10:05:41

I've found our nearest roundabout to be a good source for large size studding.

As builders trucks go round it, they regularly shed unsecured bits of their load, and I've got M16, M20 & M24 studding off the tarmac. In fact, over the years the supply has exceeded my demand so clearing the road to prevent punctures [honest, guv wink ] has led to a bit of clutter in the workshop.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Small dia end mills
12/07/2017 15:43:12

If there is one with a 1.5mm hole & 7mm OD, I want to know where to get them... I've come close to having end mills spark eroded to make them like that.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Depth of cut
11/07/2017 16:26:57

For info, on metric external threads, with a sharp point cutter, DOC = 0.7578 x P where P= pitch.

Source, Kempes Engineers Handbook, 1988, page E6/3 Fig 3, calculated from thread height H = 0.866025404P x 7/8 to allow squaring off of the ends.

For metric internal threads, it's DOC = 0.6495 x P.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: What Lathe Sould I Buy?
11/07/2017 13:57:13

With more industrial lathes, consider what weight you can move.

Hobby lathes like the Clarke 430 are pretty heavy at 130kg, but are very light compared to more industrial lathes. The one we have were I work is a medium sized Colchester & weighs 8 tonnes (when being installed they had to use both 5 tonne fork-lift trucks to lift it). Can your workshop cope with this weight & is access suitable for the equipment needed to move it? I helped a neighbour move his 3/4 tonne mill. It was 'interesting' getting it along his garden path because the thin 1950's concrete path broke up as the trolley rolled over it.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: cleaning brass after soldering
09/07/2017 17:14:35

Brick cleaner usually contains hydrochloric acid. It would work pretty well.

Regards

Richard.

Thread: What Lathe Sould I Buy?
09/07/2017 13:03:29

The differences between a Sealy SM27 and a Clarke 430 are small. I have a Clarke 430 and the Warco version of the Clarke 500, a WMT300/1. The are plenty good enough for .05mm on diameter and using the compound slide improves accuracy too. The Clarke needs a new gear spider to permit LH threads to be turned. Changing gears on these lathes is best described as a right pain. Not having a half nut does slow things down.

Don't bother with the milling head, it really isn't up to much, and isn't worth paying any extra for.

They are good, sturdy, and very cost effective machines if you can get one for sub £850. They are not good for the nth degree of precision, but few things really need precision better than .01 mm, which is achievable with these machines. If you find you need better precision - try changing the design maybe?

Regards

Richard.

Thread: Compatbiity issues with French propane bottles.
06/07/2017 16:25:36

I've heard the same from campers trying to get their bottles re-filled in France, unless it's Camping-Gaz, it's impossible.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: dead vice
06/07/2017 16:21:53
Posted by Bazyle on 06/07/2017 13:45:08:

Quick, there are lightning storms around at the moment. Stick a bolt through its neck and rig up a wire pointing skywards................

For all the latest lightning in real time, take a look here: **LINK**

It's been a pretty active day today.

Regards,

Richard

Thread: Insulating mats
06/07/2017 15:47:14

**LINK**

Bit crispy, but is flame proof & can be cut to size.

I've melted glass soldering mats when plumbing - in an emergency I had to deal with a CH system & couldn't completely close the stop-cock. Ended up using high power on the torch to boil off the dripping water as it came through & in doing so melted the glass mat, nearly setting the skirting alight.

Regards,

Richard

Thread: Echoes from the oil country
04/07/2017 13:46:21

How about new ones here: **LINK**

As for 'Are they worth a read?' I re-read mine regularly, but they are not everyone's cup of tea. They are a collection of discreet articles that are re-prints from the American Machinist magazine, and are informative & interesting. How Bill Osbourne describes the countryside, the way the machine shops worked and all sorts of anecdotes which can often be classified under a number of general headings like : 'Idiot customers', 'I'm an idiot sometimes', 'No, no, don't do that!' and 'Gremlins'.

I looked up the area he describes. The machine shop no-longer exists, but is remembered in the street name, 'Machinist's Road' and the city of 'Pit Hole' he talks about once or twice was once the area of highest land values anywhere in the US, however the last building in the city was demolished in 1968. Google Earth shows the street layout over a green field.

I thoroughly enjoyed the series.

Regards,

Richard

Thread: Collets
30/06/2017 09:58:09

Edited after seeing lathe details - Thor has it nailed.

Regards,

Richard.

 

Edited By richardandtracy on 30/06/2017 10:00:34

Thread: Old rollocks
30/06/2017 09:52:05

Almost certainly. But in most cases they are referring to working with the stuff 8hrs a day, 5 days a week. Once a year will be less dangerous than a woodbine once a month.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Boiler Welding
29/06/2017 14:00:15

That is a tasty bit of welding. Hard to believe it's not done with automatic machinery.

We had one welder who appeared to be almost that quality, but unfortunately we discovered in a crash test at MIRA that she did a fantastic capping run, but never seemed to get the weld to go through the thickness. As a result the bits she did flat-packed themselves on impact with the test block. She is now welding up arty steel bodices for the fashion industry in her spare time & wheelchairs as her day job.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: 3D printed soft jaws
29/06/2017 09:04:37

Dave,

Thanks for the video - exactly as I would have modelled it. The only thing I could comment on is you create axes down the centres of holes, if you were to make 'Temporary Axes' visible, you'll find each cylinder or portion of cylinder has one (SW2006 on, may be before but that was the first version I saw).

Murray,

Your version showing modelled threads is an advance on the 2014 Premium version I use, which does not show modelled threads. The only way I can get my one to do threads is the same as Dave showed. Interesting upgrade if you do lots of 3d printing.

Regards,

Richard.

28/06/2017 15:14:55

Muzzer,

With regard to the threads in SW, thanks for suggesting what you did, but I can't get them anywhere, and also have no dropdown adjacent the hole wizard button on the ribbon. Using the 2014 edn which may explain it. There is no option to use anything other than cosmetic. Maybe we need an upgrade version, though it won't happen for another 3 years given the company's computer upgrade cycles.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: Crap vee blocks and "Oxford Precision"?
28/06/2017 13:00:59

IIRC it led to a terminal (for the company) joke called 'The Texas Chain Store Massacre'. If they were financially shaky it could have led to the company going bust.

Regards,

Richard.

Thread: 3D printed soft jaws
28/06/2017 12:45:09

Dave,

Silly SolidWorks question - how do you model the thread? Is it a triangle swept on a multi turn helix or is there something in the hole wizard I've missed? Just trying to find the quickest way of doing it.

Regards,

Richard

Thread: Milling in lathe
28/06/2017 08:38:17

I would like to add a couple of observations about LBSC's writing.

It was a very sparse writing style in comparison to most modern ME writers. He never/rarely mentioned problems, assuming the reader was competent to anticipate, avoid or work around them. A great deal was left for the reader to work out for themselves. I have a TEE reprint of the articles describing the 'Rainhill' build. 14 pages covering the boiler, chassis, cylinders, wheels, reversing gear and tender. That is not a great deal of description by modern standards. No one part is adequately detailed by modern engineering standards, either, but there is enough info for anyone competent to make the loco & get it running.

The other side of the sparsity of his writing is the confidence he instilled. As problems are not mentioned, they cannot possibly exist. So, with the blithe confidence of the truly ignorant, either you fall into every bear pit there is, or you sail through and nothing goes wrong.

All-in-all I enjoy reading his work, but would rather make a Greenly design. Greenly was a real engineer & has all the explanations at his fingertips - he knew his stuff to a depth that feels lacking with Curly. However, Greenly sometimes lost sight of the fact he was making a model & ifull size practice is not necessarily transferrable to a model and his writings lacked the self-confident 'bounce' of LBSC's.

Regards,

Richard

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